NYC Marathon 2012 (Read 2538 times)

    Obviously, the powers that be have been paying attention to our thread and have seen the error of their way.

     

     


    Awesome

      Thanks!  Yeah, the start on Verrazano and Queensboro in the middle seem like the worst of it to me, but this one guy has managed to rattle me since he's mentioned training for hills twice now.  Maybe it's also that "hill" means different things to different people?  That's what I'm going to tell myself.

       

      You won't notice the hill on the Verrazano. You'll be too busy gawking at the view.

        I hear that it's better to take the upper level .

         

         


        just a simple cat

          I hear they don't let them pee off there any more.  Big grin

           

           


          ultramarathon/triathlete

            I hear they don't let them pee off there any more.  Big grin

             

            I've never been peed on (that I know of!) and I've run on the top and the bottom.  There are no officials on the bridge, so people DO stop mid way across to pee, though many people (men and women) pee squatting at the foot of the bridge in the 30 or so minutes you stand there waiting for the cannon.  There's no shame in peeing in front of people apparently (and I've done it in recent years).

             

            As for which is better, there is a better view from the top, but you can also run to the side if you're on the bottom.  The other benefit to the top is that your GPS watch will keep the signal.

             

            But people are right, despite the really big incline start, you won't notice it, until you see the clock on the bridge and think WTF, I'm going too slow already (but that's probably a GOOD thing).  You WILL probably notice that you're first mile was slower than your second mile when you look at your splits later (again, if you're running with a GPS).  You really can shoot down the bridge for the second half.  

             

            Who's excited?  Big grin

            HTFU?  Why not!

            Coach: Empire Tri Club 

            Speed Coach: Brooklyn Tri Club


            Interval Junkie --Nobby

              I am.

               

              Green Wave 1, Corral #6.

               

              No idea what that means.  I'm sure I'll be rubbing elbows with the elites, though. Wink

              2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon ("Congrats! It's tough to race with poop in the mind" --Wing)

              Current Status 03/17: Drinking beer and eating crap -- all the things I couldn't do before the marathon


              Interval Junkie --Nobby

                Just found this nice link of Wave / Corral numbers.

                 

                Oddly, my number is in the 6k range, which looks like Corral 3.  But my registration says Corral #6.  Could someone FedEx me a clue?

                 

                Also, anyone know the mapping of wave/corral to bridge deck?

                2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon ("Congrats! It's tough to race with poop in the mind" --Wing)

                Current Status 03/17: Drinking beer and eating crap -- all the things I couldn't do before the marathon

                  green is lower, blue and orange are upper deck


                  ultramarathon/triathlete

                    Also, anyone know the mapping of wave/corral to bridge deck?

                     

                    I'm not sure if they've posted it yet, but eventually they post a map of the "Athlete Village."  On it, you'll see the routes from each Color Staging Area to their start corral holding area, and then their eventual path to the foot of the bridge.

                     

                    It's amazingly well set up.  I complain about a lot of NYRR things, but the staging for the marathon is not one of them.   You can move between any of the color's areas or stay in your own, or stay in the neutral area where the stage and music is.   Eventually they make announcements on the many many speakers, and in many many languages telling people to head to their corral.  I find it rather surreal hearing the messages in English, Russian, Japanese, Italian, French, German, etc.  For some reason, it's exciting.

                     

                    There's also an area with a Dunkin Donuts truck giving out free coffee and hot tea, as well as an area giving out free bagels (and I think cream cheese).  And also usually an area where PowerBar hands out snacks.

                     

                    There are ample porta potties, but you should still hit one when you arrive since eventually some of them get pretty nasty, and lines do eventually form.  There are also some porta potties in the corals once you've lined up and after you've dropped off your bag (if you're dropping a bag).  So you can still hit a bathroom while you're waiting for your coral to start the slow march to the foot of the bridge (where you'll wait again for a bit, and maybe join others in another final pee-squat).  Eventually, the cannon goes off and you listen to Frank Sinatra sing NY, NY as you start over the bridge.  Then the sound of helicopters takes over, then it's the sound of 1000s of beating feet, then, once off the bridge, it slowly becomes a non-stop cheering session. 

                    HTFU?  Why not!

                    Coach: Empire Tri Club 

                    Speed Coach: Brooklyn Tri Club


                    Best Present Ever

                      I'm not sure if they've posted it yet, but eventually they post a map of the "Athlete Village."  On it, you'll see the routes from each Color Staging Area to their start corral holding area, and then their eventual path to the foot of the bridge.

                       

                      It's amazingly well set up.  I complain about a lot of NYRR things, but the staging for the marathon is not one of them.   You can move between any of the color's areas or stay in your own, or stay in the neutral area where the stage and music is.   Eventually they make announcements on the many many speakers, and in many many languages telling people to head to their corral.  I find it rather surreal hearing the messages in English, Russian, Japanese, Italian, French, German, etc.  For some reason, it's exciting.

                       

                      There's also an area with a Dunkin Donuts truck giving out free coffee and hot tea, as well as an area giving out free bagels (and I think cream cheese).  And also usually an area where PowerBar hands out snacks.

                       

                      There are ample porta potties, but you should still hit one when you arrive since eventually some of them get pretty nasty, and lines do eventually form.  There are also some porta potties in the corals once you've lined up and after you've dropped off your bag (if you're dropping a bag).  So you can still hit a bathroom while you're waiting for your coral to start the slow march to the foot of the bridge (where you'll wait again for a bit, and maybe join others in another final pee-squat).  Eventually, the cannon goes off and you listen to Frank Sinatra sing NY, NY as you start over the bridge.  Then the sound of helicopters takes over, then it's the sound of 1000s of beating feet, then, once off the bridge, it slowly becomes a non-stop cheering session. 

                       

                      you make me want to run this marathon.  


                      ultramarathon/triathlete

                        you make me want to run this marathon.  

                         

                        There's a reason this will be my 7th consecutive time racing it :-)

                        HTFU?  Why not!

                        Coach: Empire Tri Club 

                        Speed Coach: Brooklyn Tri Club

                          Getting really excited for this one.  I've never run a big marathon before.  I'm in Orange Wave 1 coral 14.  Hope to see some other RA runners there.

                          Julia1971


                          All in for Boston

                            This might be a dumb question or unanswerable, but, how bad is the crowding? Does it ever thin out or is it pretty bunched up the whole time? I ask because I'm in Wave 2/Corral 22, which from what I can tell is 3:30-3:40 pace. I was hoping to try for sub-3:20 but am wondering if I should start lowering my expectations.

                            Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin


                            ultramarathon/triathlete

                              Short answer, Julia:  you'll be fine and you'll get space to yourself pretty early on.

                               

                              Long answer:  Even with that corral and wave, it will thin out for you.  It's always a packed race, given the number of runners, but as you run along 4th ave for the first 6 or 7 or so miles, it's a very wide double-road so you will not be elbow to elbow or anything.  In fact, I bet once you get going down the Verrazano bridge after about the first mile, you'll find you have some room to maneuver around people and get your pace settled.  The congestion at the start will just keep you running a bit slower up the bridge for the first mile, which will be beneficial later on by forcing you to go out easy.

                               

                              It gets more congested again around the Williamsburg Savings Bank in downtown Brooklyn, which I think is around mile 9.  That's where the Orange, Green and Blue merge together and everyone starts using the same timing clocks (up until then there are different clocks along the way for the different colors).  Still, you'll have room to move and go fast if you want to. 

                               

                              Even when I ran with the 4.5 hour pacers (when my wife and I ran it together in '10) we had plenty of space to ourselves to move around.  There are 40K+ runners, but aside from the start line, you're not really on top of each other.   The wave starts, the wide road in the beginning, and the distance, all help spread people out. 

                               

                              Of course, all of that said, keep in mind NYCM is not really a "PR" marathon.  The bridges are pretty big "hills."

                              HTFU?  Why not!

                              Coach: Empire Tri Club 

                              Speed Coach: Brooklyn Tri Club

                              Julia1971


                              All in for Boston

                                Short answer, Julia:  you'll be fine and you'll get space to yourself pretty early on.

                                 

                                Long answer:  Even with that corral and wave, it will thin out for you.  It's always a packed race, given the number of runners, but as you run along 4th ave for the first 6 or 7 or so miles, it's a very wide double-road so you will not be elbow to elbow or anything.  In fact, I bet once you get going down the Verrazano bridge after about the first mile, you'll find you have some room to maneuver around people and get your pace settled.  The congestion at the start will just keep you running a bit slower up the bridge for the first mile, which will be beneficial later on by forcing you to go out easy.

                                 

                                It gets more congested again around the Williamsburg Savings Bank in downtown Brooklyn, which I think is around mile 9.  That's where the Orange, Green and Blue merge together and everyone starts using the same timing clocks (up until then there are different clocks along the way for the different colors).  Still, you'll have room to move and go fast if you want to. 

                                 

                                Even when I ran with the 4.5 hour pacers (when my wife and I ran it together in '10) we had plenty of space to ourselves to move around.  There are 40K+ runners, but aside from the start line, you're not really on top of each other.   The wave starts, the wide road in the beginning, and the distance, all help spread people out. 

                                 

                                Of course, all of that said, keep in mind NYCM is not really a "PR" marathon.  The bridges are pretty big "hills."

                                 

                                Thanks! This is reassuring. The bigger races I've run (like the Army Ten Miler) have not been conducive to moving up very much so I was concerned... I'm still getting conflicting advice on the hills. I think I'm just going to have to learn the hard way on that issue. But, I'll be okay if I don't hit sub-3:20. This year, I wanted to do some majors to see what they were like. Next year I'm going for PRs (assuming the body holds up).

                                Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin