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Do shoes really matter? (Read 209 times)

highschoolnoob


    I'm a beginner high school runner. I don't want to spend too much time or money. Is it okay just to find  a comfortable shoe at nordstrom rack in 10 minutes leave or will that affect performance by alot? I'm going to do 800m and 1600m at the track meet. I currently have 7 month old $60 Nikes with little wear.

    Daydreamer1


      That depends on you.  Some people can wear anything and others need more specific things for their feet.  I need some arch support.  If you're just starting out running it may take awhile to really determine what works best for you.

       

      Another thing to consider is what type of running you are going to be doing. Sprints, middle distance or long distances.   If you have a decent coach you may want to ask them what they recommend.

      highschoolnoob


        Are shoes taken seriously in the Olympics? Like arched foot and stuff?

          The right shoes may not help you but the wrong ones will work against you. Seeing as you're in high school, don't try to figure it out yourself yet. There are plenty of people/places that will know more - go take their help and pick their brains.

            Shoes are over-rated, but only to an extent. As mentioned above a BAD shoe, one that doesn't work with your gait or fits weird or is heavy will do more harm than good. I always mention that the cheap knock-offs at Walmart are way better than the "best" shoes you could buy just 20 years ago, and people were running very far and very fast 20 years ago.

             

            There are several inexpensive general training shoes that are great for most people.

            Brooks Launch and Revel

            Skechers GoRun6 and Ride7

             

            Other good shoes that can be bought at a discount:

            Hoka Napali and Clifton

            Saucony Kinvara

             

            The Hokas, Kinvara and GoRun6 are light enough to race in, if you have to. No, it's not good to train in heavy shoes and then race in light shoes, your gait will change and throw you off. If you get some training runs done in your light shoes as well, then it's OK. Do NOT consider ankle weights for training! Read some reviews and form a list of shoes that sound good, and look for those at the Rack or other discount stores. If you KNOW you like something, you can always find great deals online and just order them.

             

            I never buy new model shoes at full retail, I always get deals on last year's models, often for less than half price. Nordstrom Rack DOES have some decent shoes, but you need to know what to look for. I've bought some Brooks and Hokas there. I've found astounding deals on shoes at Ross Dress For Less and Marshalls. And especially at Ross for spikes; top of the line Nike Matumbos or Victory Elite for...$12-16. There seems to be a lot of Under Armour running shoes at Ross, but I'm not familiar with them.

             

            Keep in mind that decent training shoes should last 400+ miles, so it's ok to spend a little money on them.

            55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying


            runktrun

              Shoes are over-rated, but only to an extent. As mentioned above a BAD shoe, one that doesn't work with your gait or fits weird or is heavy will do more harm than good. I always mention that the cheap knock-offs at Walmart are way better than the "best" shoes you could buy just 20 years ago, and people were running very far and very fast 20 years ago.

               

              There are several inexpensive general training shoes that are great for most people.

              Brooks Launch and Revel

              Skechers GoRun6 and Ride7

               

              Other good shoes that can be bought at a discount:

              Hoka Napali and Clifton

              Saucony Kinvara

               ...

              Agree with previous posters.

              Some people are really particular about what they can and cannot wear.  I went through an 8 year period where anything other than the Mizuno Inspire (light stability) just made me few awkward and sore.  Then suddenly, I could wear almost anything.  Almost... so I'd suggest starting out with a mid-level running brand shoe and paying attention to how your feet and shins feel.  Going by feel is ok for most people.

               

              I'd add to the above list of generally decent running shoes:  New Balance Zante.  Very basic, feels responsive, neutral, retails for $100-$110, I think, but you can certainly find one on sale for much cheaper.

               

              The Hokas have a high stack height (really thick foam sole), and aren't for everyone, so just be wary of trying those out; they're very different from other shoes on the market.

              Not running for my health, but in spite of it.

              paul2432


                I agree with others, Nordstrom Rack is probably fine, but one caveat.  The shoe you buy should be a running shoe.  Don’t by a tennis shoe or cross-trainer or some other shoe that isn’t a running shoe.

                 

                One other comment.  When I was in high school my parents paid for my clothes and shoes.  If your parents aren’t paying because they can’t afford to, talk to your coaches.  Maybe they have some money to buy running shoes for athletes that can’t afford them.

                  Shoes mean a lot to me, but perhaps did more when I was walking long distances prior to starting to run. I had a persistent skin issue on my right toes that was the bane of my existence prior to switching to "proper" running shoes. Its gone now. II imagine when my running base grows I'll be happy to have good shoes on my feet. I'm also an RN, so I'm on my feet a lot.

                   

                  I happen to wear mostly Adidas, and also have the Brooks Ghost 11 GTX. The Ghost is the only shoe I've paid retail price for, as its Gore-Tex, and typically pay 50-65% of full price. Adidas are extremely durable, both in the midsole (Boost) and outsole, which is also a factor.

                  sophiaK


                    To a certain extent, it matters to me. I wear both plain walking shoes and so-called running shoes for my short runs, 15-30 min. and certainly feel the difference, less chance to twist ankles with running shoes.

                    The_Real_JZ


                    the REAL JZ

                      highschoolnoob - What did you end up buying?

                       

                      For context on if they matter, Zola Budd ran in the '84 Olympics barefoot.  That said, I ran track in the late 80's with just standard running shoes and never had much trouble.  As I've gotten older and presumably more fragile I've needed stability shoes for some over-pronation and with a little more pocket change have maybe gotten a little snobbish about shoes so I'm probably buying more than I need.

                       

                      I think as others have said, see what feels comfortable and works for you.  One recommendation would be to buy something a half size larger than your everyday sneakers/shoes.  A little more room for your toes goes a long way!  A visit to a local running store is a good first step.  Try on a few different shoes and see what feels good even in terms of size (both length and width!).  Once I find something I like I often go to Amazon or Runningwarehouse.com and get last seasons discounted close outs.

                       

                      Good luck!

                      2019:  Run my first marathon.

                       

                      "Who you are will show in what you do"

                      skim1124


                      Running to eat

                        Not as much as the shoe companies and the magazines they sell their shoes through would want us to think.

                         

                        Obviously, no one should run in shoes that hurt their feet/legs, but I don't think we need the latest and "ever-improving" technology/foam/etc. to enjoy running and racing, which is why I have never--and probably never will--buy any pair of running shoes over $100.  Waiting for sales on last year's  (or gasp! 2-year old) models has always worked for me because I don't need the latest bells and whistles.

                        Marathon PR: 2:52 (2006 Chicago)

                        Ultra #1: DNF at The North Face Thailand 100K (Feb 4, 2017)

                        Ultra #2: Finished in 6:53:03 at the Des Plaines River Trail Races 50M (Oct 14, 2017)

                        Ultra #3: The North Face Thailand 100k (Feb 1, 2020)

                          I think it depends on the person.  Personally, I am running generally injury-free since using Hoka Bondi 6 running shoes that I got in the late spring.  I've gotten injured in the past with other brands.  Then again, I'm only getting back into running after a long layoff so the technology has improved across all brands I'm sure.

                          Personal Records:

                          5K - 20:18 ran in August 2019

                          10K - 41:15 ran in September 1990