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Hands only CPR (Read 1419 times)

    I just learned about hands only CPR for adults and thought it was a good thing to know

    Maybe everyone else already knows about this and I am behind the times.

     

    There is a little online demo you can try out: http://handsonlycpr.org/handson/index.html

     

    I have no sense of rhythm; it was kind of challenging for me to stay at the correct rate.


    A Dance with Monkeys

      The idea behind this is that some people won't do ANY CPR out of fear of mouth to mouth.  ANY CPR is better than no CPR. 

       

      But CPR with mouth to mouth is possibly better.

       

      Regardless, every one of you needs to get CPR trained.

        The idea behind this is that some people won't do ANY CPR out of fear of mouth to mouth.  ANY CPR is better than no CPR. 

         

        But CPR with mouth to mouth is possibly better.

         

        Regardless, every one of you needs to get CPR trained.

         Yep, I took a class before I had my 1st kid. 10 years ago. I need to do the training again.

          I have no sense of rhythm; it was kind of challenging for me to stay at the correct rate.

           

          The Bee Gees can help with this.  As you're trying desperately to revive the person, just keep the beats to "Stayin' Alive".  Big grin  This song's tempo is spot on and the title is easy to remember.

           

          mta: I need to get recertified


          Best Present Ever

            The idea behind this is that some people won't do ANY CPR out of fear of mouth to mouth.  ANY CPR is better than no CPR. 

             

            But CPR with mouth to mouth is possibly better.

             

            Regardless, every one of you needs to get CPR trained.

             My understanding is that the issue is broader than bystanders not wanting to do mouth to mouth.  Even when chest compressions are performed correctly, pausing to deliver the rescue breaths results in a a loss of pressure.  When the compressions are restarted, by the time the pressure has built up again, the rescuer is pausing for the breaths and loses the pressure.  My knowledge is mostly from a presentation of a systematic review conducted by very bright graduate students, so I'm obviously no expert.  But I understood that as far as we know at this point, even though lab studies (pigs, models) would indicate that the rescue breaths improve oxygenation, the observational studies show that the outcomes (neuro impairment, long term survival) are actually no worse with compression-only CPR than with compressions+breaths.  Of course, I don't know what the hell I'm talking about and compression-only is only for observed adult cardia arrest and not all the other possible reasons for basic llife support ... so take a CPR class, like Trent said


            Dave

              The idea behind this is that some people won't do ANY CPR out of fear of mouth to mouth.  ANY CPR is better than no CPR. 

               

              But CPR with mouth to mouth is possibly better.

               

              Regardless, every one of you needs to get CPR trained.

               

              Yes.  

               

              I learned this first hand about 2 weeks ago.  Unfortunately, although the guy got a pulse in the ambulance, it was ultimately too late and he passed away in the hospital.

               

              Don't wait.  Start compressions right away.  Then call 911.  Every minute counts.

              I ran a mile and I liked it, liked it, liked it.

              dgb2n@yahoo.com


              A Dance with Monkeys

                 My understanding is that the issue is broader than bystanders not wanting to do mouth to mouth.  Even when chest compressions are performed correctly, pausing to deliver the rescue breaths results in a a loss of pressure.  When the compressions are restarted, by the time the pressure has built up again, the rescuer is pausing for the breaths and loses the pressure.  

                 

                Yes.  This is also a factor.


                A Dance with Monkeys

                  I learned this first hand about 2 weeks ago.  Unfortunately, although the guy got a pulse in the ambulance, it was ultimately too late and he passed away in the hospital.

                   

                  Most out of hospital cardiac arrests do not end well.  The very BEST thing you can do for somebody with a cardiac arrest is to defibrillate them.  If somebody goes down from an arrest, if at all possible, get your hands on an AED (automatic external defibrillator).  These are designed to be super simple to use.  They are present in most major public places, such as malls, grocery stores, airports, large office buildings, etc.  Make sure your church, synagogue, mosque, other religious institution has one as well. Early defibrillation, preferably within a few minutes of arrest, is the best way to save a life.

                   

                  And, make sure you know CPR.


                  Needs more cowbell!

                    Most out of hospital cardiac arrests do not end well.  The very BEST thing you can do for somebody with a cardiac arrest is to defibrillate them.  If somebody goes down from an arrest, if at all possible, get your hands on an AED (automatic external defibrillator).  These are designed to be super simple to use.  They are present in most major public places, such as malls, grocery stores, airports, large office buildings, etc.  Make sure your church, synagogue, mosque, other religious institution has one as well. Early defibrillation, preferably within a few minutes of arrest, is the best way to save a life.

                     

                    And, make sure you know CPR.

                     

                    Like Sweeter, I've not taken any CPR refreshers since I was preggers...11 years ago.

                     

                    Trent, I've seen the AEDs in businesses and other public places.  Do you suppose those would ever become a device that people would have in their homes, like a fire extinguisher?  One of those devices you hope you never have to use, but don't ever want to regret not having available after the fact.

                    Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

                    '14 Goals:

                    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                    xor


                      My parents have one at home.

                       


                      Best Present Ever

                        You can buy them as robert's parents have done but they aren't cheap - >$1000.
                        Eoin


                          I teach first aid/CPR/AEDs for treating adults, kids and infants. It's not a very happy subject, but everyone who takes the class is there to learn and most have a story to tell or want to be prepared. 

                          We used to teach two person CPR, but it was found to be too complicated for some people, so it has been altered to one person compression only CPR. Even so, with immediate action, most people who have to be treated in this manner will not survive. Not due to to the treatment given, but due to the nature of the injury/illness or whatever. An estimated 20% will pull through, so it's worth knowing and trying. One of the people you treat could be a relative or friend.

                          Eoin

                          Next goal: Sub4hr in DCM

                           

                          http://eobeara.blogspot.com