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what are some good taper nutrition ideas? (Read 1014 times)

    foods? vitamins? How can I feed my body to recover and be race ready in 19 days? anything in particular I should focus on?
    Jennifer mm#1231


    A Dance with Monkeys

      Proteins early, carbs late. Plenty of fluids, but make sure to taper these back in the last day or two. Lots of salts from sports drinks or, as I prefer, from Mexican food and chips. I always grab a big sushi meal about 48-96 hours before the race. I always eat my last big meal a good 12 hours before the event so it has time to move through. Don't overeat, and watch your weight. If your calories go up and your effort goes down, you may gain (and have to carry on the race) a few pounds. Eat a lot of whole wheat and whole grain products. I also eat a lot of fruit and veggies in the early part of the taper.
        ok thanks! I know I should know this but it helps to read it all over again. protein, check. mexican food, check. sushi, check. saki? margaristas? oh yeah, post race. check!
        Jennifer mm#1231


        A Dance with Monkeys

          Good point. I nearly always have a beer the day before the marathon. Sometimes two. I will also have a couple beers or wine during the week. Helps me sleep and provides good carbs. Big grin


          Kill

            Trent, I totally get everything in your reply, except for tapering on fluids. Why or how does this help? Not that I don't believe, just asking.

            Passion is a rather frightening thing because if you have passion you don't know where it will take you.

             

            When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?


            A Dance with Monkeys

              If you drink too much before a run, you risk the following problems - 1. Gotta pee before the run, which adds a stress as you try to wait in the line to the portapottie and then get back to the start 2. Means you need to consume even more salt to balance the fluids you have taken in in the days leading up to the race 3. You may need to pee earlier in the run than you otherwise would have 4. May increase your risk of hyponatremia I prefer to run on the dry side. Dehydration slows you down; overhydration kills you. Typically, by starting dry and hydrating based on thirst, I end up just right in a marathon and never have to pee before or during the race. My last drink is usually before bed, with a sip before leaving the house. The emphasis on prerace and during-race hydration is overrated, and may be dangerous.
                If you drink too much before a run, you risk the following problems - 2. Means you need to consume even more salt to balance the fluids you have taken in in the days leading up to the race I prefer to run on the dry side. Dehydration slows you down; overhydration kills you. Typically, by starting dry and hydrating based on thirst, I end up just right in a marathon and never have to pee before or during the race. My last drink is usually before bed, with a sip before leaving the house. The emphasis on prerace and during-race hydration is overrated, and may be dangerous.
                yep. I usually run on the very dry side. It just works for me. But I ran a HM in Jan and overhydrated the day before and am pretty sure it led to my first experience with leg cramps by mile 10. Lesson learned. People laugh at my pre race funyun habit but I crave something salty and just a handful does the trick.
                Jennifer mm#1231
                  I read about a cool carbo-loading technique in the CUTTING EDGE RUNNER that I used before my last triathlon... 1-2 days before your race, you do a decent warm-up, followed by 3 minutes @ VOMax pace, followed by 30 second sprint, followed by a full dose (or double dose) of a recovery drink like Endurox. (If you're concerned about pulling a muscle on the sprint, you can do the same workout on a bike - which is what I did.) Supposedly this tricks your body into thinking it's going to really need carbs, and then you dump 'em in when the muscles are ready and willing to accept it. Worked better for me than planning pasta for five days. Smile

                  Go to http://certainintelligence.blogspot.com for my blog.

                    Amen to the sushi and beer, Trent! I find myself eating sushi 24-48 hours before long runs and races. 1-2 Heineken the night before the race are a must, for me. I find other ways of eating carbs than just pasta, which I tire of quickly. I look to things like brown rice (for sushi too), potatoes, whole wheat bread. For proteins, I usually look at grilled salmon and chicken. My favorite pre-race meal is two pieces of whole wheat bread, toasted, with crunchy peanut butter and strawberry jam. I wash it all down with about 8 oz of watered down Orange flavored Gatorade. Typically, I try not to eat much more in the weeks leading up to races. A bit, but not a ton.
                    Jeffrey


                      Marcus, Is this a website ... or a book you refer to. Thanks!
                      I read about a cool carbo-loading technique in the CUTTING EDGE RUNNER


                      Kill

                        If you drink too much before a run, you risk the following problems - 1. Gotta pee before the run, which adds a stress as you try to wait in the line to the portapottie and then get back to the start 2. Means you need to consume even more salt to balance the fluids you have taken in in the days leading up to the race 3. You may need to pee earlier in the run than you otherwise would have 4. May increase your risk of hyponatremia I prefer to run on the dry side. Dehydration slows you down; overhydration kills you. Typically, by starting dry and hydrating based on thirst, I end up just right in a marathon and never have to pee before or during the race. My last drink is usually before bed, with a sip before leaving the house. The emphasis on prerace and during-race hydration is overrated, and may be dangerous.
                        Ah, gotcha, Trent. I thought you meant taper down the fluids in the days before the race - the night before/morning of makes sense. I'm with you on running a little dry - I'm not a big fan of the porta-pottie line, either.

                        Passion is a rather frightening thing because if you have passion you don't know where it will take you.

                         

                        When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?