1

Running Surfaces (Read 573 times)

    Okay, guys, I need some help. I know that running surfaces can play a big part in avoiding injury. And I know that flat dirt or asphalt trails are the best bet. In a perfect world, none of us would ever run on concrete again! Here's the dilemma: I don't live in a perfect world, or even a town that makes a lot of effort to have running trails. They're getting better, but my primary choices are either flat concrete or slanted asphalt. Which would you choose? Running on the concrete increases the impact on my (already sensitive) knees, but running on the slant irritates my left achilles tendon. I typically combine the two, and when one body part starts hurting I switch it up. Wink Thanks for any input!
    "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?' " - Peter Maher, Irish-Canadian Olympian
    Scout7


    CPT Curmudgeon

      I would choose the level surface. Any local tracks you can run on? Even if you just did shorter runs on those. Just make sure that you alternate direction, because that will cause problems as well.
        I typically only have this problem for my long runs. My every day runs are done on the treadmill. (*sigh* I'm really getting tired of the damn thing). There is a track that I could use, but I don't want to do my 15 miles runs there. I was thinking about just putting a few miles of it in the middle of my run, though. Thanks for the advice!
        "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?' " - Peter Maher, Irish-Canadian Olympian


        Burninated Peasant

          If you're only hitting the roads once a week for the long run, you can probably do all concrete and come out ok. It hasn't caused me any injuries, and I run a good portion of my other runs on concrete as well. I do make an effort to run on flat asphalt whenever I can, but asphalt isn't very plentiful in my area.
            Any kind of camber really messes up my stride. If it were my choice, I'd go with a level bed of nails over a slanted all-weather track. Tongue
            How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.


            I've got a fever...

              I also agree with everyone above who would pick the level surface. I've had all sorts of injury trouble with my right leg, and I think most of that is due to road slant. If you're doing mostly concrete, be mindful of your shoes and replace them more often so you can always have ample protection from the hard surface.

              On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

              va


                Hi CallieB, another option is to run some of your miles on a treadmill, which are a lot easier on the legs...
                  Thanks for the input, everyone! I do use a treadmill for the majority of my runs, which (oddly enough) actually seems to be harder on my legs sometimes than the outdoor surfaces. Confused I guess I'll just stick to what I'm doing, and maybe add in some miles at the high school track in the middle. Thanks again!
                  "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?' " - Peter Maher, Irish-Canadian Olympian


                  i can't hang

                    take a drive out to the country. there are probably lots of roads with low traffic so you can run closer to the center of the road where its level. plus the scenery is awesome. i ride my bike out there all the time, and, most of the field animals are used to people in cars, walking, biking, whatever. this one farm i ride by, though, every time i do i yell "stampede!"... all the cows stop whatever they were doing, grazing or just laying around, and run a couple hundred yards back to their barn. like 75 of em! it makes me smile. nowhere else, though, do i encounter such skittish farm animals. if i say something to them, they just look at me, casually, then commence daily activities. anyways, if you have time, maybe country roads could be a possible solution. good advice, everyone?
                    round, round, round the bend...