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How long do very light shoes last? (Read 903 times)

    I am thinking about trying a pair of New Balance Minimus or something similar, possibly Saucony Kinvara or Adizero Boston.

     

    I realize individual mileage varies widely so absolute mileage does not mean much, but a comparison would help.

    The minimalist shoes don't have the substantial heel and sole of say the Asics 1100 series or Mizunos I am used to- will they last half as long?

    Only a third as long?

    There has to be a reasonable amount of value for me to make the decision.

    PBs since age 60:  5k- 24:36, 10k - 47:17. Half Marathon- 1:42:41.

                                        10 miles (unofficial) 1:16:44.

     

    spinach


      I wear two pairs of New Balance Minimus shoes MR-10 and NB 730.  Both pairs lasted longer than i expected, longer than the previous shoes I wore.  They don't have any padding or cushioning to wear out.  I expected i would need to replace them after 300 or 400 miles but now both are at about 600 miles and they seem to be fine.  The NB730 sole is starting to show some wear and will probably be replaced soon but they feel fine other than that..  The more minimal the shoes are the less there is to wear out.

        Seems to me that the lighter shoes last longer. I'm currently wearing some Kinvaras that I am over 600 miles on and have also put 500+ on a pair of NB 1400s.

          I have a pair of Inov8s that are about 6 ounces.

           

          They have almost 1,200 miles on them.

           

          So, I wouldn't say something minimal and light won't last.

          "When a person trains once, nothing happens. When a person forces himself to do a thing a hundred or a thousand times, then he certainly has developed in more ways than physical. Is it raining? That doesn't matter. Am I tired? That doesn't matter, either. Then willpower will be no problem." 
          Emil Zatopek

            The kind of runner that can tolerate 'light' shoes is usually efficient and can more than likely tolerate much higher mileage on any shoe.  Also, lighter shoes have less doodads (posts, stability devices etc) to wear out.  Totally depends on the runner, try some and see.


            I'm back!

              Huh, I rarely get much over 300 on my Saucony Fastwitch 4s. But then, I'm not super light, at 165.


              Ostrich runner

                Depends on what you're using them for. I've had flats and spikes that lasted a decade. If there's no cushioning, there's nothing to crush.

                http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum

                  The kind of runner that can tolerate 'light' shoes is usually efficient and can more than likely tolerate much higher mileage on any shoe.  Also, lighter shoes have less doodads (posts, stability devices etc) to wear out.  Totally depends on the runner, try some and see.

                  +1.  A lot depends on how you run...and what materials are used for outsole and midsole.  If the outsole is "blown rubber" (usually in lighter color), it's a low density sponge and wears faster upon friction.  If outsole is more dense rubber (usually in black, but not always, and shiny), then usually last longer.  The latter is heavier so usually not being used for light racing shoes.


                  Fat butt on couch

                    I have heard of some that don't last long ( Nike Mayfly) but those are typically ultra minimal. Your standard flat should last a very long time. I still own every pair I ever bought! My very first pair probably has 2000 miles on them. I glued the outsold back on twice. The heel is finally worn through. But I could still run a 5k in them. They are about fifteen years old. Most of my flats are about eight years old. I still race in them as they are discontinued and I have not found a flat style I like as much. I need to however, as the newest has four marathons on it and they do start to get a bit hard for that type of work.

                    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                     


                    jules2

                      The kind of runner that can tolerate 'light' shoes is usually efficient and can more than likely tolerate much higher mileage on any shoe.  Also, lighter shoes have less doodads (posts, stability devices etc) to wear out.  Totally depends on the runner, try some and see.

                       I agree flats seem to last a lot longer than you would expect afterall there can't be much difference between really well worn flats and barefoot running can there ?

                      Old age is when you move from illegal to prescribed drugs.


                      Oh roo roooo!

                        I have heard of some that don't last long ( Nike Mayfly) but those are typically ultra minimal.  

                         

                        I have to say, I have a pair of these that I got on a really cheap sale.  Nikes are not my favorite brand of shoes, as there always is something in the arch area that just feels slightly weird to my feet, but I couldn't resist the cheap price, being kind of a shoe slut as I am....Anyway, I have almost 200 miles on the Mayflies and they still feel OK to me.  I don't wear these (or any other real minimal shoes) for long runs, but I do use them for anything up to about 6 or 8 miles, and have had no issues w/them feeling hard or broken down yet, at least at those shorter mileages. 

                        MrH


                          I have 900 miles on a pair of Nike Frees. I am hardly light at 200 and the reason they will be retired is the uppers wearing out.

                          The process is the goal.

                          Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.

                            I have 900 miles on a pair of Nike Frees. I am hardly light at 200 and the reason they will be retired is the uppers wearing out.

                             

                            This is what's killing my Inov8s--the upper is shredded where the shoe flexes. I'm not super light, myself, but the shoe has no midsole to break down.  I have a second pair I wear for races (I fear the upper tearing apart mid-event at this point, basically), and they feel exactly the same as the old, worn pair ('cept the old pair's upper has more give Smile

                             

                            I originally thought they'd rip apart a lot sooner.  I started seeing tears at around 400 miles.

                            "When a person trains once, nothing happens. When a person forces himself to do a thing a hundred or a thousand times, then he certainly has developed in more ways than physical. Is it raining? That doesn't matter. Am I tired? That doesn't matter, either. Then willpower will be no problem." 
                            Emil Zatopek

                              FWIW (not much, probably), I retired my first two pairs of Vibrams at 1145 and 851 miles.  Holes in a couple of toes.

                              Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                                I find that the more miles I run, the more miles I get out of my shoes. And the less shoe I need. 

                                 

                                I have 2 pair of Kinvara 2s. The first pair feels flat and broken down after 375 miles. The second pair has over 400 and still have life in them. I'm not as hard on shoes as I used to be, apparently. I also have a pair of Boston 2s with 630-something miles on them and still going. I have a pair of Boston 3s that are almost 500 and still going. And a pair of Adios 2s, which is a marathon racer/flat with over 300 and considering that for my upcoming marathon.

                                 

                                A few years ago I'd have been hard pressed to get 350-400 miles out of a pair of trainers. 

                                 

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