So would anyone care to explain VO2... (Read 2241 times)


Just Be

    I'm highly doubting the fact that anyone here learned anything from this thread.
    I did. Big grin Well, at least the topic of submax V02 was clarified for me.
      I did a Google search on Vo2 Max. I randomly selected 5 or 6 articles, and each and every one of them states that Vo2 Max can be increased with training.


      Idiot

        I did a Google search on Vo2 Max. I randomly selected 5 or 6 articles, and each and every one of them states that Vo2 Max can be increased with training.
        I'm not saying you're right or wrong (there are plenty of others here who will readily agree/disagree with you), but did these articles cite research? If I have an opinion I want to support I'm sure I can find backup on the internet, but it doesn't mean much? Heck, many of the popular "fitness" magazines have been known to print all kinds of crazy stuff that is based on sketchy or no research. That said, I'm out of this thread. Goodbye, cruel world. *click*

        I decided that if I'm going to call myself a runner, I should probably run.


        A Dance with Monkeys

          I did a Google search on Vo2 Max. I randomly selected 5 or 6 articles, and each and every one of them states that Vo2 Max can be increased with training.
          Oh. Then I guess it must be so.


          Fat butt on couch

            Sorry I'm late to this party, and am posting without reading all posts, but here it goes. (First, apologies to Trent for putting a bullseye on him) VO2max is NOT FIXED FOR LIFE. Some sources say something that can be misconstrued this way, but what it really means is that the benefits are relatively limited. In other words, you can't double your VO2max. But you can make substantial improvements. Read Lance Armstrong's first book, where he discussed being tested immediately upon resuming training after cancer treatment and then again when he was in shape. While his "untrained" VO2max was high compared to the average man (reflecting his incredible talent), he did increase it significantly through training. VO2max is the maximum amount of oxygen USED (not just delivered to muscles) per minute, expressed as a function of body weight. Oxygen delivered does not count if it is not used -- the machine measures exhaled CO2 and O2 and compares to O2 that was inhaled to calculated how much O2 was actually used. This means that many trainable factors can influence VO2max: -cardiac output (O2 delivery) -mitochondrial density (O2 utilization) -capillary density (O2 delivery) -aerobic enzyme levels (O2 utilization) -body weight (efficiency) While some factors, such as capillarization, require a long period of training to induce, a lot like enzymes, cardiac output, and mitochondrial number can be boosted much quicker. This is why you do a period of fast intervals going into key races -- you get a quick boost in VO2max. VO2max can be trained through slower running by affecting things like capillarization, but responds best when you actually push your body to use your VO2max through intervals.

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             


            A Dance with Monkeys

              Hey spaniel, thanks for your thoughts. I agree with everything you say except this: what you are describing as VO2max is really submax VO2. The true VO2max is your VO2 measured at both maximal sustained exertion and maximal personal fitness. Lance Armstrong's VO2 after treatments was done in a relatively decondition state. It was therefore not his true maximal. Once he sharpened his conditioning back up, I suspect that his VO2max measurements were the same before and after his treatments. That is, his VO2max was around his genetic potential.
                Just to be clear, those of you still engaged in a pedantic discussion of VO2max are doing so for fun, right? Because you're scientists or whatever and you enjoy this stuff? Right? Because the random newbie runner could get the wrong impression that knowing, or being able to measure, or improving one's VO2max were somehow important to running success. Which is not the case.

                Runners run.


                A Dance with Monkeys

                  Mikey. Exactly.
                  Trent. If you agree with this, then why are you splicing and dicing concepts instead of explaining them simply in terms that ordinary folks can understand?


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    Spaniel is not ordinary folk.


                    I've got a fever...

                      Because the random newbie runner could get the wrong impression that knowing, or being able to measure, or improving one's VO2max were somehow important to running success. Which is not the case.
                      Word. The goal is run faster, not raise your VO2max, VO2submax, VDOT, or VO5. If someone says, "I want to raise my VO2max", that's the wrong statement, no matter what the definition of is is. However, you can do so-called VO2max training, (i.e. running at vVO2max, I-pace etc.), and you will get faster. The fact that Vsubsomething goes up (depending on how you define/measure it) is really meaningless, though. What matters is that you have gotten faster.

                      On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                        I'm not saying you're right or wrong (there are plenty of others here who will readily agree/disagree with you), but did these articles cite research? If I have an opinion I want to support I'm sure I can find backup on the internet, but it doesn't mean much? Heck, many of the popular "fitness" magazines have been known to print all kinds of crazy stuff that is based on sketchy or no research. That said, I'm out of this thread. Goodbye, cruel world. *click*
                        I understand your point, but you don't have to look too hard to find research that indicates that Vo2 Max can be increased with training. On the other hand, finding documentation supporting the argument that Vo2 is fixed is quite a chore. I'm not going to bother linking the articles I read. I wasn't specifically looking for evidence to support one side of the argument or the other. I'm not an expert on the subject, but anyone can type Vo2 Max in a search engine and see the same thing.
                          I reckon (and bear in mind that I am as much of an amateur as almost anyone else on this site (a few exceptions)) that your VO2 Max may be able to be improved very slightly, but not significantly. What you probably can alter is your ability to reach your VO2 Max. For the vast majority of us mere mortals, VO2 Max will not be the limiting factor in how fast we race. Don't worry about it. Anyway. Far too much time and ink has been wasted on this when we should have been running. FFS - run. Run some more. You will get faster. If that is what you want.
                          Scout7


                          CPT Curmudgeon

                            Trent, What you've said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.


                            The Greatest of All Time

                              However, you can do so-called VO2max training, (i.e. running at vVO2max, I-pace etc.), and you will get faster.
                              Sounds like Daniels. I think I read somewhere that shorter distance runners, like 1500 or 5000 guys and gals have higher Vo2Max's than marathon runners. Having a very high LT is more beneficial to longer distance runners.
                              all you touch and all you see, is all your life will ever be

                              Obesity is a disease. Yes, a disease where nothing tastes bad...except salads.