12

Getting back in to running atter 30yrs - Support and Training Plans needed. (Read 900 times)

comeonkez


    Hi

    Every year I make a resolutuion to get fit and every year I fail as I dont have the motivation.

    I've had to deal with a number of difficult situations over the past few years and have decieded that I can do it.

    I always enjoyed running long distance in my teens and have decieded tio give it another go.

    I'm 43 in a few weeks and have just run my 1st 1k (ok had to stop twice for the dog to catch up) and feel amazing (but shattered!)

     

    I'm looking for support/training programs from the established runner and support from fellow newbies to keep me going.

     

    How oftern should I run at what distance to build up my fitnes level.

     

    Any help support words of advise more than welcome.

     

    Thansk in Advance.

     

     

    Kerry xxx


    day after day sameness

      Kerry,


      There are some wonderful programs designed just for folks in your situation -- starting out and wondering how to structure their running efforts. One of the most popular is called "Couch to 5K", often abbreviated C25K.  There are a wide variety of sources for 'couch to 5K', and there are 'couch to 10k' programs and others for longer distances.  Just give "couch to 5K" a google, or start by looking at Coolrunning's program. (I think they started the program..)

       

      You'll get a wide range of advice and opinions here, but the advice offer is to focus on run/walk each day for certain amount of time (30 or 45 minutes is a good start).  Head out the door for the time, and walk some, run some, walk some, run some -- change up the mix of walk and run depending on how you're feeling.


      Most of your running should be slow and easy -- you've got to build up your body's strength before worrying about how fast you're going. Run lots, mostly easy.

      I've done my best to live the right way; I get up every morning and go to work each day...

      comeonkez


        Hey Thanks soo much for the quick reply,

        I've just located the site and i'm going to sign up!

        Any other tips greatfully received.

        O whats the view on running shoes?


        just a simple cat

          ...O whats the view on running shoes?

           we look down on them.

           

          ha ha ha ha ha ha  Big grin

           

           


          day after day sameness

            O whats the view on running shoes?

             

            Other than looking down on them, as Ilene notes....shoes that fit well, and are a good match to your feet are good. That doesn't mean you need to most expensive, or most cushioned, or "most" anything. Try out one of the many shoe-selection guides you can find online, ask advice from folks you know who run, ask you local running shoe store, etc, etc, -- find what works for you.

            I've done my best to live the right way; I get up every morning and go to work each day...

              Hi Kerry. I started what you are doing last year. I found that tracking my runs was extremely beneficial, as was posting to Facebook. Once my friends started giving me "likes" and other encouragement..... I just didn't want to stop. I also signed up for local runs a couple months in advance so I always had something to train for. My marathon running younger sister generously ran slow with me in a couple races which helped alot. By the end of the year (Dec 31st) I beat her in a 10K by several seconds! I'll second the on-line shoe guides..... but go to a local store to try them on,,, fit beats style in my book. If I could share just one piece of advice, it would be to NOT over do it! Increase distance slowly. Sign up for a 5K in April, and slowly work up to it! Best of luck, and Happy, Healthy New Year.

              comeonkez


                Thanks for the feedback 5k on the 25th March for sporta relief.

                  Hi Kerry,

                   

                   

                  great to see your motivation, not only does it help yourself it helps motivatie others as well.    Milk Truck gave some great advice, just take it easy & slow & very gradually build up # of days you run & endurance.  focus more on duration than on pace.  signing up for that March 5k is very good & also be sure to log your runs.   helps not only to track your wo's but also motivating, but please, please, please do not get caught up in   pushing your runs (distance or pace) or increasing mileage every day or week.   ok to take cutback days or weeks, good for recovery.  have the attitude of being in this for the long haul.  just getting out there consistently will help you improve naturally.  you have plenty of time in the future to be concerned with more specific type wo's.  and most important:  have fun with it!

                  gpb


                    Hi Kerry,

                     

                    Similar situation here though shorter hiatus.  Getting back into the routine myself.

                     

                    Lots of good advice above, here are my thoughts for what it's worth:

                     

                    Shoes - good to have.  Big grin  I use a local running store that videos your feet running on their treadmill as you try different shoes; this way you can get just the right shoe to correct any over/under-pronation.  Sure you pay MSRP, but since I'm no expert in fitting myself for shoes, being able to see for yourself how different shoes affect your footstrike is worth it IMHO.

                     

                    Motivation - gotta figure out what keeps YOU motivated.  For me it's having a race coming up; it's easier to get out the door when I've paid the entry fee for an upcoming race and told all my friends/family that I was running it.  It's also easier to get out the door when I'm on a structured training plan even if it's something I made up as an amalgam of various other plans.  

                     

                    Slow Down - you probably remember this, but just in case -- you can't have every run be a grueling session or you'll drop out.  Do lots of easy enjoyable runs where you finish looking forward to the next run.

                     

                    Training - if you've been out of running for a really long time, I definitely agree with using a C25K program as recommended.  Pick an upcoming 5K race at the appropriate time in the future and do the program.  Also have additional races planned so when you run that first 5K you don't fall into the "okay what now?" trap; you'll just keep on training for the next race and the one after that.  

                     

                    Tracking - I'm a bit OCD, so tracking my runs is a big thing for me.  It really helps in motivation to see how I've improved over time.  


                    jules2

                       we look down on them.

                       

                      ha ha ha ha ha ha  Big grin

                       

                      Ilene you haven't lost your touch Kez I can't really add anything to what's already been said, personally I wouldn't run if I didn't race as that gives me the impetus to get my trainers on and pound the streets but we are all different.

                      Old age is when you move from illegal to prescribed drugs.


                      Fast is better than long

                         we look down on them.

                         

                        ha ha ha ha ha ha  Big grin

                         

                        Try the veal, she'll be here all week.

                         

                        I did the run/walk based upon distance, but it's the same principle. I found a 3 mile loop and walked it then walk ran it then ran it.

                         

                        The motivation is a big key, just know you'll have good and bad days even in the walk/run phase; leverage those good days to get past the bad ones.

                         

                        I believe the only important piece of gear is shoes. As has been said they come in many flavors and almost all people are different. You do not need the most expensive, but I would definitely suggest going toa a running store vs. a Dick's, etc. Ask lots of questions try on every shoe in the store, at this point you mostly need comfort. You want the early months of running to be enjoyable so that tere will be later months of running.

                         

                        Kudos for the initiative and this site will be a big motivator.

                        2014 Goals: 2500 miles / sub 2 800m / 4:30 mile / sub 16:30 5K


                        Give a man a fire and he'll be warm the rest of the night;
                        Set a man afire and he'll be warm the rest of his life.

                        What in the Jehu?

                          Hi

                          Every year I make a resolutuion to get fit and every year I fail as I dont have the motivation.

                          I've had to deal with a number of difficult situations over the past few years and have decieded that I can do it.

                          I always enjoyed running long distance in my teens and have decieded tio give it another go.

                          I'm 43 in a few weeks and have just run my 1st 1k (ok had to stop twice for the dog to catch up) and feel amazing (but shattered!)

                           

                          I'm looking for support/training programs from the established runner and support from fellow newbies to keep me going.

                           

                          How oftern should I run at what distance to build up my fitnes level.

                           

                          Any help support words of advise more than welcome.

                           

                          Thansk in Advance.

                           

                           

                          Kerry xxx

                           

                          Congratulations on starting out! Cool

                          Research and educate yourself on the following, so you can make informed choices:

                           

                          --aerobic running

                          --running by perceived effort

                          --using the McMillan and/or Team Oregon Pace Wizard calculators to help with training paces

                          --heart rate training

                          --the importance of recovery

                          --threshold tempo runs

                          --fartlek

                          --speedwork

                          --anaerobic training

                          --training load

                          --over-training

                          --Arthur Lydiard,  Jeff Galloway, Jack Daniels, Hal Higdon, Phil Maffetone, Pete Pfitzinger

                           

                          *Start out with a low volume of time per week, and build slowly (maybe 5% per week). If you ran 2 hours this week, try running 2:10 the next week. Once in awhile stay at a certain volume for a few weeks, or cut back if you are feeling tired.

                           

                          *Stay aerobic for awhile (perhaps 12-24 weeks or more). This will decrease the probability of injury and overdoing it in your first year. It's so easy to overdo when starting out. Heart rate monitors are a  great way to make sure you don't run too hard.

                           

                          *Have hard days and recovery days. A hard day might eventually be 1 hour or more, while recovery days should be either rest, walking, or running for less than hour (start out at 20-30 minutes).

                           

                          *Stay in touch with the mavens and supporters here at RA. There are some top-notch coaches and runners here with lots of experience and great advice. Here, you can discuss running all you want. "Out there" it can be tough when it comes to finding support or people to talk with when it comes to running. We're here for ya. Cool

                           

                          Good luck.

                           

                          --Jimmy

                          log   prs      Crusted Salt comic #142

                           

                            I think having a goal race is a good way to keep motivated.  Pick something that you think you can achieve in a couple of months. If you're finding it hard to run 1k without stopping then maybe doing a 5k race in a couple of months would be something to aim for.

                             

                            The other thing is that it maybe that you're trying to run too fast... try slowing down to see if you can last for a bit longer without stopping.


                            Fat butt on couch

                              Congratulations on starting out! Cool

                              Research and educate yourself on the following, so you can make informed choices:

                               

                              --aerobic running

                              --running by perceived effort

                              --using the McMillan and/or Team Oregon Pace Wizard calculators to help with training paces

                              --heart rate training

                              --the importance of recovery

                              --threshold tempo runs

                              --fartlek

                              --speedwork

                              --anaerobic training

                              --training load

                              --over-training

                              --Arthur Lydiard,  Jeff Galloway, Jack Daniels, Hal Higdon, Phil Maffetone, Pete Pfitzinger

                               

                              *Start out with a low volume of time per week, and build slowly (maybe 5% per week). If you ran 2 hours this week, try running 2:10 the next week. Once in awhile stay at a certain volume for a few weeks, or cut back if you are feeling tired.

                               

                              *Stay aerobic for awhile (perhaps 12-24 weeks or more). This will decrease the probability of injury and overdoing it in your first year. It's so easy to overdo when starting out. Heart rate monitors are a  great way to make sure you don't run too hard.

                               

                              *Have hard days and recovery days. A hard day might eventually be 1 hour or more, while recovery days should be either rest, walking, or running for less than hour (start out at 20-30 minutes).

                               

                              *Stay in touch with the mavens and supporters here at RA. There are some top-notch coaches and runners here with lots of experience and great advice. Here, you can discuss running all you want. "Out there" it can be tough when it comes to finding support or people to talk with when it comes to running. We're here for ya. Cool

                               

                              Good luck.

                               

                              --Jimmy

                               

                              This is great advice....however, it also points out that this can be every bit as complicated or simple as you want it to be.  I suggest trying to keep it simple as you are starting out, so you don't get disheartened or feel confused.

                               

                              Priority #1 right now is to get out the door consistently, gradually increase the distance you can run, and keep the efforts truly easy -- a pace you can converse at -- except for MAYBE one day a week when you pick it up at the end of the run...and I'd even hold off on that for 4-6 weeks. 

                               

                              While you are doing that, join some groups here....perhaps even 1-2 which seem too advanced for you.  This will help you learn from those more experienced.  Other beginners can give you support and camraderie, while more experienced runners can help you learn and advance better.

                               

                              Welcome and hope to see you around here.

                              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                               

                                Kerry--I started running at age 47 (now, 53).  I could never run more than 3.5 miles in my previous bouts with running.  I started real slow and worked at extending my distance.  I told myself "another football field--another 100 yards".  This convinced my mind that my body could, indeed, go farther than I thought.

                                 

                                Once I broke through the 3.5 mile barrier, I began increasing the mileage slowly--I forget the number that is recommended (a certain percentage increase over a two week period).  I also fell victim to trying to match the distances and times of others and feeling bad when I couldn't.  DON'T.  Find what works for you.  I finish near the back of the pack in every race I've run.  I don't care.  I'm comfortable running 10min. miles and that's what I do.  I may never do a full marathon.  I'd like to but if it causes me to burn out, it's not worth it.

                                 

                                I don't come to this website for advice or training tips, I just read it because (virtually) 'being around other runners makes me want to get out the door'.  This site is great for motivating you to push through the low points.  And, with respect to getting going, the C25K has been so successful for so many, it's hard to argure with that program.

                                 

                                But the overriding theme is that running can be and should be fun and you can't get so wrapped up in "making progress" that it becomes a chore.

                                 

                                Have fun!

                                 

                                TC

                                "I'd rather die while I'm living than live while I'm dead..." J. Buffett There are two rules in life: 1.) Don't sweat the small stuff 2.) It's ALL small stuff

                                12