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Weather (Read 1464 times)


Spring- wishful thinking


    Edited to add: in any case, I buy that for some people in some conditions, they run the same (or faster) paces at night.  I posted my "seriously?" comment because it seemed like you hadn't even considered the possibility that folks might get more cautious when they can't see stuff that might hurt them.

     

     I don't slow down, but have definitely had a few dumb ass trips and close calls on twisted ankles due to fallen branches, washed out trails, and frozen horse turds (yeah seriously those are the worst).  Smart people probably slow down Wink

     

    Oh, and although I run with a headlamp, I don't usually turn it on unless the clouds are really thick. 

      I find I do run slower after dark, probably because I'm tired by then.  In the winter, most of my runs are in the dark because I don't get home til 3:30 or 4:30 and it gets dark at 5.  

      'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

       

      "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

       

      "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

      xor


        Frozen horse turds are AWFUL.  We have a night 50k in the Seattle area in January called the Bridle Trails 50k.  You can guess that it involves trails with horse poo.  Pretty technical stuff too. This is a crazy race because if it is warmer than freezing, that means it is probably raining... which leads to horse poo puddles that can be shin/knee deep.  And if it is colder than freezing, you get frozen crap... which will turn your ankle just like that (snap).  Bleh.

         

        Some years, that race has a dnf rate of over 75%.

         

        RAer smalcolm ran it this past January and absolutely killed it.  (in a good way)

         

          All I know is that I am much more likely to trip over (fill-in-the-something) and bust out my teeth when I run at night, so I run more cautiously.  Plus I'm usually tired at night.

           

          So I run slower.

           

          Edited to add: in any case, I buy that for some people in some conditions, they run the same (or faster) paces at night.  I posted my "seriously?" comment because it seemed like you hadn't even considered the possibility that folks might get more cautious when they can't see stuff that might hurt them.

           

          No I know. I was genuinely interested because it doesn't appear to affect my pace in the slightest. But this is why I generally don't bother logging my time, although Garmin does it for me these days (as I've joined the 21st century!)

           

          But just so you know srlopez, I'm not following you!! Wink

          Never forget the man who mistook his wife for a hat!

          Ποτέ δεν ξεχνά τον άνθρωπο που μπέρδεψε τη γυναίκα του για ένα καπέλο!

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