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Drills to correct splayed feet running form (Read 1835 times)

evtish


    I run kind of splayed foot, probably about 20 degrees on toe off and landing. It' s really pronouced, about 45 degrees, when my heel lifts to my butt and my leg starts driving forward. It doesn't feel like I'm doing this, but all the pictures and some video I've seen tell the true story. I figure I must be loosing some efficiency from this and was wondering if there are drills people have done to get their feet parallel to the path of motion? Has anyone had this issue and had success in improving their running form? Thanks.
      I have the same issue with my right foot, but haven't found anything that helps. If I concentrate on keeping my foot straight, it feels like my leg is twisting strangely.


      day after day sameness

        I'm fairly duck-footed when walking as well, but do run with a pretty straight foot plant -- or at least that's what my footprints in snow look like. You'll find that as you add miles and run more and more, your body will gain efficiency on its own -- it just becomes a better machine for the most part. Let this happen naturally. If you try to correct it, you'll create all sorts of bio-mechanical forces in your hips and knees from inverting your foot's natural direction.

        I've done my best to live the right way; I get up every morning and go to work each day...

          I run against this guy on Tuesday nights, please do not help him. Thanks. Evil grin

          E.J.
          Greater Lowell Road Runners
          Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

          May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

            evtish, my right foot goes out to the side as you describe. Not sure why or how, but it is the weak link in my running form: my injuries always begin in the right leg. In a decade-plus of running, I haven't been able to get it to straighten out, and I have spent time really trying to fix it and then time where I just gave up and let it go. Both strategies seemed to have similar results. I think the question that may guide you to some array of answers/strategies is along these lines: Do I have any tight muscles, weaknesses, or other sorts of imbalances elsewhere that lead to this problem or are a result of this problem?
            evtish


              I run against this guy on Tuesday nights, please do not help him. Thanks. Evil grin
              Big grin Just trying to loose the duck on steroids form.
              DoppleBock


                For me as I bring my leg back forward - My right foot circles out - I had someone look at my gate and immediately they said - Weakness in hips. This weakness causes my right knee to come inside on foot plant, then when I bring my leg forward the foot flails out to compensate. I am looking for a good rubberband to put around my ankles to do crab walk strengthening exercises. All the focusing on my lower leg and foot in the world would have done nothing for the real issue.

                http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                 

                  You have to be VERY careful working on changing your footstrike. You could create problems with lower back, hips, knees, and feet if you try to make a change without understanding your 'normal' gait. Read up on over/under pronation and proper body aligment before even attempting to change your footstrike. Someone (with the same problem) already described a 'leg twist' that could result in an injury (or even making you less efficient). And I'm sure tht's just the opposite result you are trying to get at. Unless you are an elite runner (sub 5 min mile) I'd only work on lengthing your stride and increasing leg turnover. Drill to accomplish this would linclude: strides, hillwork, 100m, 200m intervals, calf stregthing, hip strengthing, and core body work. If you are indeed an sub 5 min miler (you must be close with that sub 20 5k PB) then I'm guessing you already have a coach - you've indicated you have seen film of yourself; that's usually indicates some sort of gait evaluation has been done were no results given to you?


                  On My Horse

                    My friends does this really really bad, and he still manages to be pretty fast. I notice it is a lot more common in girls than in guys as well, so that leads me to believe some lower leg strength training might help this a bit. Even though it seems like something that might be a problem, from a mechanical stand point it really isn't that big of a deal. As long as you aren't getting injuries, I wouldn't worry about it.

                    "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies with in us." - Ralph Waldo Emerson


                    The voice of mile 18

                      both my legs fly out like that and hasn't been an issue for me. My sister as well and she has qualifed for boston twice. my .02 wouldn't try and fix it - it maybe just the way your legs are. also professional triathlete and two time world champion lori bowden has a similar running style it is ugly but she runs a wicked fast marathon
                      4/18 Rutgers Half Marathon 7/20 Antrhacite Olympic Tri 9/25 chesapeakeman Ultra distance Tri Rule #1 of Triathlon Training/Racing - If Momma ain't happy nobody is happy http://community.active.com/people/Joe_h1/blog


                      Puttin' on the foil

                        You might not be able to "fix" the problem, but core work as described is some of the prior posts may lessen the motion. By core work I mean hips, butt and low back, in addition to abs. Exercises that focus on hip abduction and hip adduction may help. Theraband exercises can target these hard to get to muscles. Try tying a theraband around your ankles and walking forward - with each step make a large swing to the outside (monster walk). Copy this into your browser to see what it looks like, although this person is not using therabands. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fA5X4nKueUU). Try putting the theraband around your knees and open your legs while laying on your side (clams). Here is what it looks like... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fA5X4nKueUU). I also have pronation issues which cause my feet to sweep out to the side. These exercises have helped to minimize that and have helped with injury prevention. I hope it works for you too. Cheers.
                        Don't be obsessed with your desires Danny. The Zen philosopher Basha once wrote, 'A flute with no holes, is not a flute. A donut with no hole, is a Danish.'
                          This guy (David Kinsella) has the opposite problem. 4th at DI Nationals XC. Hundreds of miles per week.


                          Puttin' on the foil

                            Opps - here's the clamshell - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjo7joz_mrk&NR=1
                            Don't be obsessed with your desires Danny. The Zen philosopher Basha once wrote, 'A flute with no holes, is not a flute. A donut with no hole, is a Danish.'
                              evtish, my right foot goes out to the side as you describe. Not sure why or how, but it is the weak link in my running form: my injuries always begin in the right leg. In a decade-plus of running, I haven't been able to get it to straighten out, and I have spent time really trying to fix it and then time where I just gave up and let it go. Both strategies seemed to have similar results. I think the question that may guide you to some array of answers/strategies is along these lines: Do I have any tight muscles, weaknesses, or other sorts of imbalances elsewhere that lead to this problem or are a result of this problem?
                              Jeff, very interesting. I just embarked on a mission to fix a similar problem with my left foot which splays outward just a bit. I noticed that not only do I severely pronate as my left foot lands, it also seems to land directly under my center of gravity. The effect is that I consistently pull some muscles on the inside of my left ankle and leg. Also, I believe it had to do with my PF I experienced last fall, since the angled-out position causes me to "to-off" on my big toe more than the others with greater force. I've changed my stride by ensuring that my left foot is pointed directly ahead by rotating my left leg inward starting at the hip. Plus I'm consciously landing a bit further to the left of my center of gravity. The consequence so far has been soreness on the outer hip... no big deal. But given your ten plus years experience with this, I'm now unsure that this is going to "fix" any of my feet/knee issues long term.
                                But given your ten plus years experience with this, I'm now unsure that this is going to "fix" any of my feet/knee issues long term.
                                Yeah, I guess "fixing" it will depend on whether or not you've identified the "problem" that causes the imperfection. If you engage your hip muscles to straighten the leg, well you are developing them to hold the leg in the right position. But maybe you are just wasting energy fighting the original thing that caused the form imperfection. Who's to say? Surely not some schmuck on the internet. But I think that solving the problem will probably take more work than just holding the leg in the "right" position.
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