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Insoles (Read 1593 times)

    I wear orthotics and i've been telling myself to stop using them for a while now. I have two short races in the next few weeks and I am tossing my orthotics after I complete them. I want to move to a good insole. Does anyone have any recommendations?

     

      I have never replaced the insoles in my running shoes, but I hear good things about Superfeet. 

      "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

      xor


        I used to wear Sof Soles (or Road Runner Sports' inserts, which used to be made by SS, perhaps still are) and the occasional Superfeet green.

         

        About a year ago, I decided to just run in what the shoe manufacturer provides.

         

        And... no issues.  Shoes last just as long, no aches, no pains.  And a couple hundred bucks in my pocket.

         

        Everybody is different when it comes to shoes, so I'm not trying to imply it'll work for you.  But that was my experience.  I don't need them, apparently.  Anyway, I liked the Sof Soles better than the Superfeet.

         

        They squeak, though.  Powder can help with that... but can be messy.

         


        The Crap Whisperer

          Spenco Polysorb

          Being the best tiny spec that I can be!

            I wear orthotics and i've been telling myself to stop using them for a while now. I have two short races in the next few weeks and I am tossing my orthotics after I complete them. I want to move to a good insole. Does anyone have any recommendations?

             

            If the shoe fits you good, you shouldn't need a special insole to alter it.  In most cases, your shoe need the orthotics, not you.

               

              If the shoe fits you good, you shouldn't need a special insole to alter it.  In most cases, your shoe need the orthotics, not you.

               

              Serious question... why would a shoe need an orthotic? Which kind of shoe would need one?

                Serious question... why would a shoe need an orthotic? Which kind of shoe would need one?

                 

                The ones that don't fit your feet.  Like I said, they SHOULDN'T.  Which kind of shoes?  I don't know...  What kind of feet do you have?

                   

                  The ones that don't fit your feet.  Like I said, they SHOULDN'T.  Which kind of shoes?  I don't know...  What kind of feet do you have?

                   

                  Average arches, very, very slight pronation.  I just started wearing Asics Kayano. Prior to that I was wearing Asics Nimbus w/ orthotics. Last month or so I ditched the orthotics and tried the Nimbus w/out orthotics.  I didn't notice a difference w/out the orthotics other than lighter shoes and one less giant lump under my arch. 

                    Average arches, very, very slight pronation...

                     

                    It sounds like you are pretty natural and average.  So why did you wear orthotics to begin with?  What was your issue and what were those orthotics supposed to do?

                     

                    So you asked what kind of shoe might need orthotics.  So here's an example...  When you measure your foot and where it actually makes a contact with the ground, it's, what Arthur Lydiard used to say, "a banana-shape".  It's curved with the arch.  A lot of shoes are made too straight.  When you try to push a curved foot into a straight shoe, something's gotta be pushed out--whether the heel gets to be pushed inward (medially) and you'll pronate; or the outside of your foot (base of your little toe) gets to be pushed out (laterally) and you'll supinate; or where the big toe is will get pushed inward (medially) and you'll pronate.  In most cases, it's the first one, for more or less biomechanical reason, and your heel will start to hang over the midsole and "pronate".  Of course, if the shape of the shoe fits right in to begin with, this won't happen.  But at any rate, because of this, most so-called "expert" would tell you that you either need stability shoes with anti-pronation divice; OR wear orthotics to "correct your gait".  But the actual fact is; all it does is to push your foot out, usually with hard overly-developed arch (as you had experienced) so your heel would be pushed outwardly (laterally) so it won't "pronate".  Now, I've said this over and over at various threads here; PRONATION IS A NATURAL MOVEMENT.  OVER-pronation might need some attention but this natural pronation should not be "corrected" or altered.  THAT is how we started getting ITBS--really!

                     

                    Now, don't get me wrong.  SOME people DO need some divice like orthotics (personally, I would prefer soft orthtics...) because, basically, there are 3 types of "pronation" problems; (1) mechanical (faulty running style, foot hitting the ground way past the center line to the other side of the body, creating too much torque), (2) structural (something like knock-knee) or (3) faulty shoes.  MOST people, if they had been active enough in a more natural environment (like walking around barefoot a lot), their feet should be strong enough to hold the arch up so it won't OVER-pronate.  What wearing unnatural orthotics might do is to make your feet, particularly  in this case your arch, weaker and weaker.  You have a weak spot, you'll need to strengthen it; not to continue to support it.

                     

                    Does this make sense at all?

                       

                      It sounds like you are pretty natural and average.  So why did you wear orthotics to begin with?  What was your issue and what were those orthotics supposed to do?

                       

                      So you asked what kind of shoe might need orthotics.  So here's an example...  When you measure your foot and where it actually makes a contact with the ground, it's, what Arthur Lydiard used to say, "a banana-shape".  It's curved with the arch.  A lot of shoes are made too straight.  When you try to push a curved foot into a straight shoe, something's gotta be pushed out--whether the heel gets to be pushed inward (medially) and you'll pronate; or the outside of your foot (base of your little toe) gets to be pushed out (laterally) and you'll supinate; or where the big toe is will get pushed inward (medially) and you'll pronate.  In most cases, it's the first one, for more or less biomechanical reason, and your heel will start to hang over the midsole and "pronate".  Of course, if the shape of the shoe fits right in to begin with, this won't happen.  But at any rate, because of this, most so-called "expert" would tell you that you either need stability shoes with anti-pronation divice; OR wear orthotics to "correct your gait".  But the actual fact is; all it does is to push your foot out, usually with hard overly-developed arch (as you had experienced) so your heel would be pushed outwardly (laterally) so it won't "pronate".  Now, I've said this over and over at various threads here; PRONATION IS A NATURAL MOVEMENT.  OVER-pronation might need some attention but this natural pronation should not be "corrected" or altered.  THAT is how we started getting ITBS--really!

                       

                      Now, don't get me wrong.  SOME people DO need some divice like orthotics (personally, I would prefer soft orthtics...) because, basically, there are 3 types of "pronation" problems; (1) mechanical (faulty running style, foot hitting the ground way past the center line to the other side of the body, creating too much torque), (2) structural (something like knock-knee) or (3) faulty shoes.  MOST people, if they had been active enough in a more natural environment (like walking around barefoot a lot), their feet should be strong enough to hold the arch up so it won't OVER-pronate.  What wearing unnatural orthotics might do is to make your feet, particularly  in this case your arch, weaker and weaker.  You have a weak spot, you'll need to strengthen it; not to continue to support it.

                       

                      Does this make sense at all?

                       

                      Mind if I send you an email? I have your address... 

                        Mind if I send you an email? I have your address... 

                         

                        Getting a little personal, huh? ;o)  Not at all.  Go right ahead.  And thanks for asking here first--that's very plite of you.  Thanks.

                          I will only add this:

                           

                          I battled shoes and orthotics for years and suffered myriad lower leg injuries. Shin splints, periostitis, plantar fascitis, stress reaction, blah blah blah. Docs and other "experts" said I needed them for my low arches. But I ditched them during marathon training and ran in Mizuno Riders (neutral, pretty low profile) and ran my first marathon with no problems whatsoever. Sometimes we look for biomechanical fixes when we simply need to ramp the miles slowly, build leg & foot strength and run more efficiently. YMMV.

                           

                            I will only add this:

                             

                            I battled shoes and orthotics for years and suffered myriad lower leg injuries. Shin splints, periostitis, plantar fascitis, stress reaction, blah blah blah. Docs and other "experts" said I needed them for my low arches. But I ditched them during marathon training and ran in Mizuno Riders (neutral, pretty low profile) and ran my first marathon with no problems whatsoever. Sometimes we look for biomechanical fixes when we simply need to ramp the miles slowly, build leg & foot strength and run more efficiently. YMMV.

                             How did you ditch your orthotics? I plan to do the same in a few weeks. Did you start slow then gradually build milage? Or did you pickup where you left off? I use to walk and run with my toes pointing out. about 6 months ago, I decided to rotate my legs inward so my toes are pointing forward as I run. over time I noticed that my toes were pointing forward when I walk as well. As a result, my flat feet are no longer flat. I think walking with your toes out causes more pronation resulting in flat feet.  I don't think I need my orthotics but I'm scared to ditch them.

                             

                              How did you ditch your orthotics?

                               

                              Okay, first you pick up both of your orthotics with your right hand and slowly walk toward the garbage bin... ;o)  Just kidding.  Couldn't help...

                               

                              ...I use to walk and run with my toes pointing out. about 6 months ago, I decided to rotate my legs inward so my toes are pointing forward as I run. over time I noticed that my toes were pointing forward when I walk as well. As a result, my flat feet are no longer flat. I think walking with your toes out causes more pronation resulting in flat feet.  I don't think I need my orthotics but I'm scared to ditch them.

                               

                              You're correct, if your toes have tendency to point outward, you probably have higher likelihood of pronating or possibly exess pronation.  This is because pronation is a result of "torque".  If your toes are pointing out, as the bottom of the foot, wherever it may be, touches the ground, your ankle would "roll over" your foot; then your knee "rolls over" your ankle....hense, you pronate. 

                               

                              However, "forcing" your toes to point inward may or may not work.  You'll have to identify what's causing your toes to point out or in.  Usually, it is the muscle strength inbalance between lateral side and medial side of your (mostly) thighs/hips.  In your case, it might have worked; but it could result something disastorous if you ignore the root of the issue. 

                               

                              Same thing with your flat foot.  Above situation, possibly when your foot rolls to pronate, then your arch actually takes a lot of pressure and this could possibly strengthen your arch and you may actually develop better and stronger arch this way.  Some of the greatest runners, be it a miler or a marathon runner, had been a toe-pointing-outward-guy.  In fact, some of the pictures, you just simply wanna hide your eyes because their foot rolls so much but they ran alright; one of them in fact didn't have a single running-related injury for almost 50 years!  So what do you know...

                               

                              My suggestion actually is NOT to start with the "looks"; be it toes pointing inward or outward.  Make sure you understand what's causing your toes to point out or in and, if necessary, try to eliminate that.  Forcing your form to change would usually result other issues elsewhere.

                                 How did you ditch your orthotics? I plan to do the same in a few weeks. Did you start slow then gradually build milage? Or did you pickup where you left off? I use to walk and run with my toes pointing out. about 6 months ago, I decided to rotate my legs inward so my toes are pointing forward as I run. over time I noticed that my toes were pointing forward when I walk as well. As a result, my flat feet are no longer flat. I think walking with your toes out causes more pronation resulting in flat feet.  I don't think I need my orthotics but I'm scared to ditch them.

                                 What shoes do you run in? A stability shoe will give you a nice transition. If you are in a neutral shoe it is less of a transition. I cannot function without my orthotics for more than one reason. I use them in a neutral shoe. I would not attempt to run in a neutral shoe if I went without them but that's just me.

                                Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!

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