12

If you increase your long run.... (Read 1735 times)

    what do you do with your other runs during the week? For example, I am currently running about 3 to 3.5 miles 4 times a week. If you go by the 10% rule, I should start doing a "long" run of about 4.2 miles once a week. I was planning on doing that for a few weeks, then increasing it again. My question is, at what point do I increase the distance of my other runs during the week, and by how much?


    Hawt and sexy

      The 10% rule is for increasing mileage. A long run should be about 25% of your weekly mileage. You only run 4 times a week. Are you good at math? MTA- public log please?

      I'm touching your pants.


      Hoodoo Guru

        Listen to your body. If you feel like running a little more during one of your mid-week runs, go for it. If you want to increase your long run by an additional 1/2 mile or mile (or more) because you feel great, go for it. If your body starts rebelling, either by injury or tiredness, then back off a little. Push yourself when you feel good, back off when you don't.

        The tangents are moot.

         

        iLoveAdvo.com

         

          What I have done is this: add 10% every other week to your long run and then the other weeks add 10% to one of your short runs. Example (I'll just add one mile to make it simple...) 3333 3334 3434 3435 3445 3446 4446 I'm no expert but this has worked for me in the past, but I add 10% of my weekly mileage not just one mile... It's also important to cut back on your long runs every once in a while and do a shorter long run as the distances get drawn out.
          mdmccat
          Scout7


          CPT Curmudgeon

            A lot of this answer depends on you. How long have you been running? How well has your body adapted to the stresses of running? How quickly do you recover from these runs? At this point, it's useful to look at training plans to see if there's a common pattern amongst them as to how they build weekly mileage. Most plans follow the 10% rule, because 10% is pretty easy to figure out. Also, many follow a stepped approach: they build for two-four weeks, then step the mileage back on the last week some, and then proceed to build again. Another option is to keep mileage the same for two-three weeks, step it up the following week, and repeat it that way. This eliminates the cut-back week. I would say that 10% is a good starting point. So take your weekly mileage, and add 10% of it, then split it up over the week. If you find that you can do more, then go for it. If you find that you can't handle a 10% increase, then drop it down to 5. There's no set pattern here. Best advice is to listen to your body as you start to gradually increase your miles.


            Beatin' on the Rock

              What I have done is this: add 10% every other week to your long run and then the other weeks add 10% to one of your short runs. Example (I'll just add one mile to make it simple...) 3333 3334 3434 3435 3445 3446 4446 I'm no expert but this has worked for me
              Me too! Smile
              Be yourself. Those that matter, don't mind. Those that mind, don't matter.
                what do you do with your other runs during the week? For example, I am currently running about 3 to 3.5 miles 4 times a week. If you go by the 10% rule, I should start doing a "long" run of about 4.2 miles once a week. I was planning on doing that for a few weeks, then increasing it again. My question is, at what point do I increase the distance of my other runs during the week, and by how much?
                Hi PP~ Are you following a training program? Lots of folks do either the One Hour Runner program ( which is what I am almost done with) or the Hal Higdon Spring Training program. Both are excellent at building a base mileage foundation for you to get stronger on.I am about where you are with the mileage, completeing C25K in November. Using One Hour Runner, My long run is now 4.6-5.0 miles, or a 50 minute long run. Since you already have run your First 5K, you are ready to progress into a solid training program for a larger base mileage. I am sure lots of folks will chime in and give you some good suggestions to keep you on track with your progress.I think training programs are the key when you are a new runner to keep you on track without injury, and to keep you regimented in your training. Good Luck, and Congrats on your First 5K race! Loved your race report! Smile

                2014 Goal : " Be my own Hero" 

                 " Choose Joy"

                  Increase your long run distance and a mid week semi long run. So a schedule for you for upcoming 6 months might be as follows starting with the low number and working up to the high numbers. Focus on increasing the longer runs first before adjusting the Day 1 and Day 3 distances. Take your time. Day 1 3-5 miles Day 2 5-10 Day 3 3-5 Day 4 4-7

                  Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    People. Define: long run.
                      Thanks y'all! I think your advice will really help. Cheffy, I checked out the training programs, and I do think its a good idea to have a plan on paper like that. I love a plan. My husband is frequently annoyed by that. Big grin I think higdons spring training will suit me better, just because it's in mileage rather than minutes. Somehow, I feel like I'm progressing more if it's based on mileage. That way I know I made it a certain distance. Thunderthighs and mdmccat, I really like your strategy too. Seems to me like you are increasing total weekly mileage at a faster rate this way. Covering more ground, so to speak. (I haven't done the math yet, though, and YES I am good at math Roll eyes ) I'm going to sit down tonight and see what I want my plan to be for the next few months. Thanks again for the help.
                        Trent, At this point, MY definition of long run is anything longer than 5K distance. I've only been running since October '07 and just ran my first 5K this past weekend. Currently I'm running between 12 and 14 mpw. I want to begin to increase my mileage in a reasonable manner to avoid injury, while feeling like I am progressing at a reasonable pace as well. --Anna
                          Thanks y'all! I think your advice will really help. Cheffy, I checked out the training programs, and I do think its a good idea to have a plan on paper like that. I love a plan. My husband is frequently annoyed by that. Big grin I think higdons spring training will suit me better, just because it's in mileage rather than minutes. Somehow, I feel like I'm progressing more if it's based on mileage. That way I know I made it a certain distance. Thunderthighs and mdmccat, I really like your strategy too. Seems to me like you are increasing total weekly mileage at a faster rate this way. Covering more ground, so to speak. (I haven't done the math yet, though, and YES I am good at math Roll eyes ) I'm going to sit down tonight and see what I want my plan to be for the next few months. Thanks again for the help.
                          Hi Again PP~ Here is a link to a discussion from a week or two ago, and in it is the plan I am going to next from One Hour Runner, It looks like a GREAT base foundation plan, a 16 week plan but It was hard to find online, (my DH posts about that) If you would like it, please let me know an email address and I will be happy to send it to you. DH put it in an excel sheet. Check it out, and see what you think. http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/54a0b753e5d94d05bd3bc8478636921f BTW, make sure you pick up with your current level of fitness when you do HH. You are pretty conditioned at this point to start it from the beginning. Best, Cheffy Smile

                          2014 Goal : " Be my own Hero" 

                           " Choose Joy"


                          A Dance with Monkeys

                            Trent, At this point, MY definition of long run is anything longer than 5K distance. I've only been running since October '07 and just ran my first 5K this past weekend. Currently I'm running between 12 and 14 mpw. I want to begin to increase my mileage in a reasonable manner to avoid injury, while feeling like I am progressing at a reasonable pace as well. --Anna
                            See, in this case I would NOT think about any runs as long. Your main focus should be on increasing your overall miles with runs of different lengths. But your long run (i.e., a run of around twice the distance of your other longest weekly run and 2-3 x the distance of your base weekly run) is something that you should stay away from until you have a good solid 20+ mile per week base. The only reason why you would want to do otherwise is for social reasons (e.g., the gang is going out for an hour run Saturday morning).


                            Hawt and sexy

                              You run 4 days a week, you don't need a long run. Wow. Interesting. Add another day if you would like to have a long run. Make your long public if you would like finer points in feedback.

                              I'm touching your pants.


                              HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                                I run nothing like willamona's distance (I wish), but I did push my long runs up between 10 and 20 miles last summer, and I was fairly strictly sticking to my rule of never two days in a row, so that was less than 4 days a week. (Um, ya, just because I did that doesn't prove it was a good idea, but, you know.)

                                It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                                12