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Hit a plateau (Read 102 times)

Chi-townRunner


    So I've been running for about 8 or 9 weeks now with C25k and I've done really well up until I've hit the 25min mark. I know I can, but it seems as though I've mentally hit a bad point in my runs. My knee and ankle (on my right side) aches, both hips ache, and my shin splint in my left leg hurts, but I keep going. I try to keep myself distracted, but I can only hold out until the 10-15 minute mark, and then I just start fading out. I want to take a break, quit, or slow down, and then I do. I've done 20 minutes a couple of times, but I REALLY had to push myself hard. I have no idea how to hit this block, I ran tonight after a long day, but only made it 12 minutes. I tried using the TV on our gym's treadmill, but the remote is ridiculous, and for once in my life I feel technologically challenged. Nevertheless, I do have music to motivate me. I have my first 5k April 30th, any advice would be helpful!


    Run Fastah 2018

      The point of C25K is not to push yourself so hard you need to stop. Were you new to running when you started 8 weeks ago? It takes longer for all your joints/ligaments to get used to the impact of running. Shin splints need to be taken care of or you will end up doing damage that will sideline you longer.

       

      Are you doing C25K by time OR distance? It's one or the other, but should not be both.

      Are you following the 3 workouts per week timing it has set out?

      "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

       

      Three half marathons later, I got a number. Half Fanatic #9292. :)

      Chi-townRunner


        I started when Day 1 started on my C25k app began. Before that I did elliptical for 20 minutes, an abdomen workout and some cycling on my indoor trainer. I run by time, not distance. I have done as much as I can for my shin splints, but they've never completely go away, they'll hurt one run, and the next I'm fine. I've tried everything from taking breaks, to new shoes, different jogging surfaces, the old dixie cup trick, epson salt baths, Physical therapy, and so far cross training and stretches seem to keep them under control. I ran pretty close to the 3 days a week, they've been a bit sporadic the past few weeks due to work and school obligations. The past couple weeks I haven't been able to cross train as much, could that be it? I started back to doing that this past Friday and I hope that helps some, just not sure what else to do. That has mostly been Elliptical for 20 minutes switching the intensity back and fourth, lunges with 10-12lbs weights 10 reps 4x, calf raises 10-12lbs weights 20 reps 4x, leg extension 15x 4 reps, leg press, 12 times 4 reps, and starting back this week Abs!

          For shin splints, spell the alphabet with your toes everyday, and try sitting on your haunches for a few minutes a day when your muscles are warmed up, especially after a run.

           

          You're more than likely running too hard. When you probably should be combining easy intensity running with walking. I highly suggest that you get a heart rate monitor and keep yourself  at or under an aerobic heart rate like 70%MHR or 180-age. Research heart rate training.  Good luck. 

            Something I do in the off-season that I find to help a ton in getting me through about any run is training on the stationary bike. It's no-impact, so great for keeping your legs feeling like they're being beaten to death and it is great training for your heart. You can plug in music and keep track of your heart-rate throughout the entire workout.

             

            Honestly if you're finding it harder and harder to get out and run each day, take a break for a week and hit up the stationary at the gym. Pedal and warm-up for a few mins to get your legs and lungs ready, then adjust the resistance to try and get your heart rate from 60%-80% of your max heart rate, and try to hold it there for the target time of your runs. If it's too difficult at the start to stay in that range, don't be worried about taking it a bit easier. Just be sure to track your progress.

             

            I'm not a therapist or doctor or anything, just another runner with some years under my belt. Here's this so I don't seem too crazy though lol

             

            http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/PhysicalActivity/FitnessBasics/Target-Heart-Rates_UCM_434341_Article.jsp#.VwMh3KQrI2w

             

            http://www.runningforfitness.org/calc/heart-rate-calculators/hrzone

             

            Best of luck to ya mate, plateaus are not fun by any means

             

            -Caskey

            If it ain't rainin', you ain't trainin'

                            - Sarge


            runktrun

              Something I do in the off-season that I find to help a ton in getting me through about any run is training on the stationary bike. It's no-impact, so great for keeping your legs feeling like they're being beaten to death and it is great training for your heart. You can plug in music and keep track of your heart-rate throughout the entire workout.

               

              Honestly if you're finding it harder and harder to get out and run each day, take a break for a week and hit up the stationary at the gym. Pedal and warm-up for a few mins to get your legs and lungs ready, then adjust the resistance to try and get your heart rate from 60%-80% of your max heart rate, and try to hold it there for the target time of your runs. If it's too difficult at the start to stay in that range, don't be worried about taking it a bit easier. Just be sure to track your progress.

               

              I'm not a therapist or doctor or anything, just another runner with some years under my belt. Here's this so I don't seem too crazy though lol

               

              http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/PhysicalActivity/FitnessBasics/Target-Heart-Rates_UCM_434341_Article.jsp#.VwMh3KQrI2w

               

              http://www.runningforfitness.org/calc/heart-rate-calculators/hrzone

               

              Best of luck to ya mate, plateaus are not fun by any means

               

              -Caskey

              ^ That should be a red flag.  A few bad days here and there are expected in any training cycle, but you should not feel like you are going backwards.  You don't have to be running 100 mile weeks to overtrain; you can overtrain at low mileage if your workload increases are outpacing your physiological adaptations and it sounds like that's where you are.  Your aerobic system will likely improve faster than your muscles, bones and ligaments can recover, adapt, and increase in strength.  Take a few more easy days than usual.  If you usually run every other day, take 2-3 days of rest with light activity like an easy spin on the bike or yoga, then ease back into it with an easier effort like 3 x 5:00 run/ 2:00 walk until you can build back up to solid stretches of running.  Also, try adding some strength training that include core stability and plenty of glute work.  One of my favorite workouts is runners world Iron Strength, specifically the jump squats, jump lunges and one legged hops https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXT8E-nQgB4  I found that the plyometric movements can be done by almost anyone.  Unlike serious weight lifting, you don't have to have perfect form and just attempting some of these exercises will help you make running specific strength gains.  FWIW, I have traveled to NYC to see Dr Metzl for ongoing hip problems and this routine was the first thing that provided me any relief and improvement.

               

              Listen to your body.  You'll get there!  You still have time to prepare for that 5k on 30 April.  I would suggest that you just don't ramp up your mileage or try anything new the week before the race.  Good luck!

              Not running for my health, but in spite of it.

                You may simply be running too fast.  Slow it down.  If you're running 10 minute miles, drop to 10:30 or even 11:00. If you're running 12 minute miles, slow it down to 13 or even slower than that.  You have time to build speed.  Right now work on your endurance.

                 

                Are you doing all your runs indoors on the TM?  If so, try running outdoors, in a place you enjoy seeing (i.e. park, pretty neighborhood, etc.)  Keep it slow and easy.  Try going a little farther on each run. i.e. run 1.5 miles, then turn around and head back. If you feel like you absolutely positively can't run another step, walk a minute, then pick up the pace again.  On your next run, run a block farther before turning back. Increase the distance slowly.

                Chi-townRunner


                  Yes, I think that's it, between boredom, working on strengthing my hips, I think I also need to slow my pace down. I start out well and then I start fading out because of the pace that I've set myself at. I think I just haven't realized that on longer runs I need to run slower than when I was running shorter runs at a faster pace. I'm going to run tonight and see how that goes. Other than using a watch and taking my own pulse, is there a device that I could use that would provide me with a way simpler method of doing that?

                    Something you can do is map out your route before you run and know the half mile and mile marks of your route. Then just check your watch mid run and figure out your pace. There are plenty of websites where you can draw your route on google maps and itll tell you your distance. I think this website has one too unde the 'resources' tab

                    If it ain't rainin', you ain't trainin'

                                    - Sarge

                      Yes, I think that's it, between boredom, working on strengthing my hips, I think I also need to slow my pace down. I start out well and then I start fading out because of the pace that I've set myself at. I think I just haven't realized that on longer runs I need to run slower than when I was running shorter runs at a faster pace. I'm going to run tonight and see how that goes. Other than using a watch and taking my own pulse, is there a device that I could use that would provide me with a way simpler method of doing that?

                       

                      No need to know your actual pace while you're running at this point.  Just go at a pace where you could hold a conversation with another runner without gasping for breath.  If you are alone, then it can help to recite something simple from time to time to see if you are running too hard.  If you have music, recite the words of some of the songs out loud as you go.  If you can sing along, then you are definitely going slow enough, but that may be too slow.

                       

                      Later, you may want to get a running watch (I.e. Garmin) that will tell you your actual pace either during or after your runs, but as a beginner it isn't necessary and may be counter-productive if you feel like you 'aren't fast enough'.  Speed will come in time, with more miles.  Pushing the pace early can lead to burnout and injury.

                      Chi-townRunner


                        Found a good pace today and overcame my plateau! I'm still needing to treat my issues with my hips (which I think is the root cause of the rest of my issues.) Nevertheless I finished my 25-minute run today! It came to a total of 2.64 miles with 5minutes of walking before and after my run.I figured out it was the pace that I was at, I could run fast, but not without killing myself in the long run. Thank you all for your advice! Now I just need to keep this up. Big grin