P90x (Read 6260 times)

     

     

    Are either any better than real food?

     

    Who cares about real food if you have to live your life looking like Michael Pollan?

       

      Is there any evidence that the shake is any healthier that the latte?

       

      Are either any better than real food?

       

       

      If you want more info you can get it at Shakeology.  Of course it is better than a sugar/calorie filled latte.  Then again, I have one from time to time.  Moderation is key with anything.

        Thanks for the pull-up advice.  I am doing the program with my SO, so he used the door pul-up bar while I used the bands.  It's worth considering going to Y to use the asssisted machine.

         Have you tried using a chair yet?  Works well.  When my girlfriend and I do it together we both use the same bar but we just pause the dvd while the other one does their  pull ups and she uses the chair.


        A Dance with Monkeys


           it is better than a sugar/calorie filled latte.

           

          On what basis?

           

          "The Healthiest Meal of the Day"

           

          A shake is not a meal.  There is no link to the actual peer reviewed 90-day study, just assertions on the internet.  Anybody can say anything on the internet.  There is one website I know that claims that flying monkeys exist.  It must be true; it is on the internet.  Heck, it is even on Wikipedia, so it must be true.  And even if true, all the study showed was that "participants replaced one meal a day with Shakeology and exercised regularly". There is nothing demonstrating that this was different than some control condition, that this was sustained beyond 90 days or that this led to real clinical differences in weight loss, comorbidity or mortality. And the supposed 30% reduction in cholesterol? Well, since that is substantially more than even our best drugs or exercise programs do, I am highly suspicious, especially without a control group, exposition of methods, peer review or real publication. Poison yourself if you want, but do not try to convince others that it is better than a latte without good science.

           

          I also notice that your home page on your profile is this company's home page.  Are you representing the company?  Is this all just spam?


          I'm on the right

             

            On what basis?

             

             

            A shake is not a meal.  There is no link to the actual peer reviewed 90-day study, just assertions on the internet.  Anybody can say anything on the internet.  There is one website I know that claims that flying monkeys exist.  It must be true; it is on the internet.  Heck, it is even on Wikipedia, so it must be true.  And even if true, all the study showed was that "participants replaced one meal a day with Shakeology and exercised regularly". There is nothing demonstrating that this was different than some control condition, that this was sustained beyond 90 days or that this led to real clinical differences in weight loss, comorbidity or mortality. And the supposed 30% reduction in cholesterol? Well, since that is substantially more than even our best drugs or exercise programs do, I am highly suspicious, especially without a control group, exposition of methods, peer review or real publication. Poison yourself if you want, but do not try to convince others that it is better than a latte without good science.

             

            I also notice that your home page on your profile is this company's home page.  Are you representing the company?  Is this all just spam?

             

            I really like evidence based medicine.    Especially when it is related to flying monkeys!    

            I'm Eric, the guy who runs to keep his sanity.


            A Saucy Wench

               

              On what basis?

               

               

              A shake is not a meal.  There is no link to the actual peer reviewed 90-day study, just assertions on the internet.  Anybody can say anything on the internet.  There is one website I know that claims that flying monkeys exist.  It must be true; it is on the internet.  Heck, it is even on Wikipedia, so it must be true.  And even if true, all the study showed was that "participants replaced one meal a day with Shakeology and exercised regularly". There is nothing demonstrating that this was different than some control condition, that this was sustained beyond 90 days or that this led to real clinical differences in weight loss, comorbidity or mortality. And the supposed 30% reduction in cholesterol? Well, since that is substantially more than even our best drugs or exercise programs do, I am highly suspicious, especially without a control group, exposition of methods, peer review or real publication. Poison yourself if you want, but do not try to convince others that it is better than a latte without good science.

               

              I also notice that your home page on your profile is this company's home page.  Are you representing the company?  Is this all just spam?

               Wooohoo!  I am saved!  Bonus that is an AVERAGE reduction and since if folks like dh got a 30% reduction he'd probably have some weird low cholesterol disease  someone like me must have a much higher reduction. Why are we messing around with Crestor?

              I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

               

              "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                 

                Who cares about real food if you have to live your life looking like Michael Pollan Trent?

                 

                Fixed.

                   

                  On what basis?

                   

                   

                  A shake is not a meal.  There is no link to the actual peer reviewed 90-day study, just assertions on the internet.  Anybody can say anything on the internet.  There is one website I know that claims that flying monkeys exist.  It must be true; it is on the internet.  Heck, it is even on Wikipedia, so it must be true.  And even if true, all the study showed was that "participants replaced one meal a day with Shakeology and exercised regularly". There is nothing demonstrating that this was different than some control condition, that this was sustained beyond 90 days or that this led to real clinical differences in weight loss, comorbidity or mortality. And the supposed 30% reduction in cholesterol? Well, since that is substantially more than even our best drugs or exercise programs do, I am highly suspicious, especially without a control group, exposition of methods, peer review or real publication. Poison yourself if you want, but do not try to convince others that it is better than a latte without good science.

                   

                  I also notice that your home page on your profile is this company's home page.  Are you representing the company?  Is this all just spam?

                   I actually feel that just about anything is better than a sugar filled latte. I think common sense dictates that.  We were talking about supplements and protein so I just stated what I take.  Whether or not you find any of them useful is up to you.  If you don't then that is ok to.


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    I am glad you feel that way.  Belief is important.  However, belief does not equal truth or reality, and in a sense, belief is a counter point to evidence.  That is, we have belief and feeling for where we don't have science.  In this case we do have pretty good science.  For example, a sugar filled latte contains protein, carbs and caffeine.  It is made from milk and there is actually some good science published in the peer reviewed literature that shows milk, even chocolate milk, is better for recovery than simple sports drinks.  So there is no data to support an assertion that some supplement is better than a latte, and I am not sure that the assertion even has face validity.  And I am certain the latte tastes better.

                     

                    Supplement?  What does it actually "supplement"?


                    i sacrificed the gift

                      So how are you P90X newbies doing?  Were you able to walk straight on day 3?
                      Robot House Recovery Drink Protocol:
                      Under 70 Degrees: Samuel Smith's Oatmeal Stout
                      Over 70 Degrees: Dougfish Head 60 Minute IPA
                        Thanks for the pull-up advice.  I am doing the program with my SO, so he used the door pul-up bar while I used the bands.  It's worth considering going to Y to use the asssisted machine.

                         

                        Since you're doing the workout with someone else, back in Jr. High we would have someone hold the ankles of someone who couldn't do even one dip yet (I was one of them for a couple of weeks).  Ankles crossed and knees bent at a 90 degree angle if that makes sense, without the helper really pulling any weight up.  I'm assuming that it removes the weight of the lower legs from the body weight which seemed to be enough to go from being able to do none to being able to do several.  I'm assuming it would work the same for pull ups as it does for dips and would probably be easier and provide less ability for you to cheat than the chair.


                        Imminent Catastrophe

                          I am glad you feel that way.  Belief is important.  However, belief does not equal truth or reality, and in a sense, belief is a counter point to evidence.  That is, we have belief and feeling for where we don't have science.  In this case we do have pretty good science.  For example, a sugar filled latte contains protein, carbs and caffeine.  It is made from milk and there is actually some good science published in the peer reviewed literature that shows milk, even chocolate milk, is better for recovery than simple sports drinks.  So there is no data to support an assertion that some supplement is better than a latte, and I am not sure that the assertion even has face validity.  And I am certain the latte tastes better.

                           

                          Supplement?  What does it actually "supplement"?

                           

                          "Sports nutrition" is thoroughly fraught with woo and pseudoscience. There's big money to be made convincing people that this or that ingredient will help you run faster or further. For example, wheatgrass is, well, it's grass and unless you are a ruminant it's not doing much for you. Acai is nutritious but no better than other berries (yet many times more expensive). Chocolate milk is a better recovery drink than the ones you pay big bucks for. Hornet Juice seems to be a fine mix of amino acids (protein) but, really, hornet juice? Eat an egg. Or tofu.

                          All you have to do is mix in some testimonials, better yet pay some pro athlete to endorse them, and you're rich!

                          "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

                           "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

                          "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

                           

                          √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

                          Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

                          Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014

                          MrH


                             there is actually some good science published in the peer reviewed literature that shows milk, even chocolate milk, is better for recovery than simple sports drinks.  

                             

                            Yup. But many adults who are 'serious' about their fitness would rather pay five times more for a sports drink, because chocolate milk doesn't seem like a serious drink for serious fitness people.

                            The process is the goal.

                            Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.

                               

                              Yup. But many adults who are 'serious' about their fitness would rather pay five times more for a sports drink, because chocolate milk doesn't seem like a serious drink for serious fitness people.

                               

                              What if I mix a banana with it? Does that make it a "serious" recovery drink?


                              Imminent Catastrophe

                                ...and clinical trials (so called) are not guarantee of efficacy either. This isn't sports nutrition but it's a good example:

                                The over-the-counter remedy Airborne claims to be a cold and flu remedy. The pill itself is nothing but some vitamins, some commercially tired herbs and the electrolytes you get from a swish of Gatorade. But Airborne's success springs from a remarkably shrewd and sinister campaign that employs a number of diversions to mislead the public without blatantly violating any laws. Essentially, the clever marketing messages and packaging suggest that Airborne cures the common cold, without ever actually saying so.

                                They even claimed that a double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted with "care and professionalism" by a company specializing in clinical trial management, GNG Pharmaceutical Services.

                                GNG is actually a two-man operation started up just to do the Airborne study. There was no clinic, no scientists and no doctors. The man who ran things said he had lots of clinical trial experience. He added that he had a degree from Indiana University, but the school says he never graduated.

                                It was even endorsed by Kevin Costner! Whoo!

                                <center>

                                “Look, Airborne is great. I wouldn't go on a movie set without it; it's on my plane and in my house.” -Kevin Costner, Hollywood, CA


                                Invented by a schoolteacher!

                                Well, then. So long as it's not from Big Pharma it's OK with me!

                                After the FTC cracked down on them they revised their claims a bit.

                                Many sports nutrition products utilize the same tactics.


                                MrH--what supplement makes you able to lift up that horse? I gotta get me some of that!

                                </center>

                                "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

                                 "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

                                "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

                                 

                                √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

                                Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

                                Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014