123

What is an easy run? (Read 440 times)

LedLincoln


    Yes, my easy runs are typically 2-3 minutes slower than my 5K race pace. Some people have indicated shock that my training runs are so much slower than my race pace.

    Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits.
    - Mark Twain

      I would say mine are 2-4 minutes slower as well.

        This is about a 10-10:30min mile. It doesn't feel "easy", but I do feel like at this pace, I could run for a very long period of time

         

        That's probably a good pace then.

         

        Trying to run a specific HR based on an estimate of your max HR that's probably wrong in the first place doesn't make a lot of sense, especially when you're really new to running. And telling someone who's new to running and doing about 15-20 miles per week how many minutes per mile slower than their 5k pace to run is just ... not helpful.

         

        Just go by effort. It takes a while to figure it out and at first--as you said--nothing may really feel *easy*. But over time you'll get the hang of it.

        Runners run.

          You are correct: when you're starting out there will be less variance in pace and intensity than there would be for a seasoned runner.  The other answers on here seem like good advice.  I'll add this:  your easy runs might not necessarily feel truly easy as most humans know the term, just make sure the easy runs are much less taxing than what you're doing for other training runs.

           

          This is a good answer. I should have read the whole thread and just put a "+1" on this.

          Runners run.

          DavePNW


            Yes, my easy runs are typically 2-3 minutes slower than my 5K race pace. Some people have indicated shock that my training runs are so much slower than my race pace.

             

            This seems about right based on my experience as well. Who is shocked by this?

             

            Also: I have been running "seriously" for 5-6 years. My race times have improved substantially, but my easy pace remains relatively unchanged. Is this typical for other people?

            Dave

              I think it is better to think of an easy run in terms of "easy" effort rather than a targeted pace.  Your body will tell you when an effort is on the easy side rather than the hard side.  There are just so many variables to consider to claim blah blah is my easy pace including:  built up fatigue, prior injuries, terrain, weather, running volume, life stress, and on and on.    As a newer runner you just want to make sure that you feel like you can keep running a while and not be crushed by the effort.  As long as it isn't your longest run of the week, the easy run should not leave you excessively sore the next day.  When you are new you might also experiment with breathing on your runs.  You will definitely feel a place where your breathing becomes more labored, and doesn't allow you to talk.  This is getting past the "easy" zone.

              After a time, you may find that having is not so pleasing a thing after all as wanting.  It is not logical, but it is often true. - Mr. Spock, Star Trek episode "Amok Time"

                Also: I have been running "seriously" for 5-6 years. My race times have improved substantially, but my easy pace remains relatively unchanged. Is this typical for other people?

                 

                Same.


                Dream Maker

                  Yes, my easy runs are typically 2-3 minutes slower than my 5K race pace. Some people have indicated shock that my training runs are so much slower than my race pace.


                  That's only because too many people run most their runs too fast, caring more about pride day to day than when it matters race day.  I've heard the same thing.

                   

                   


                  I Run To Eat :)

                    Hi runningdaze,   Congrats on being a new runner and I hope you get to keep it up forever !

                     

                    There's some brilliant replies in this thread so I would add my piece to keep it at your own comfortable pace and grow steadily.

                     

                    A few decades ago I was a new runner too and grew up as an Asthmatic (I'm no longer !) so I needed to start my running with weeks of walking and very short runs in between (30 second runs in between 5 minutes of walking, if you know what I mean).  Then I built it up and ran for lots of miles after that, but that was weeks later.

                     

                    Now that I run regularly the thing I've learnt (and was taught) is to make change gradually. The human body doesn't like instant change, and breaks if you push it always (that means injuries). So make slight adjustments to speed or distance over a period of weeks.

                     

                    There's more to all of this subject but I hope this info and the thread is enough to keep you going.

                     

                    Interested to find out how you've gone in a few weeks !

                     

                    Hi everyone, I'm a new runner - started training consistently around Feb. I am SO confused about what "easy" runs are for new runners that are SLOW. Seems like most info available are for fairly trained runners that have the capacity to vary their speed quiet a bit.

                     

                    I'm using lactic threshold heart rate to pace my running within HR zones. I'm currently running 15-20mpw in endurance zone (defined as 85-88% of my lactic threshold heart rate, 148-154bpm). This is about a 10-10:30min mile. It doesn't feel "easy", but I do feel like at this pace, I could run for a very long period of time If I've been running/working out a lot or feel tired, I'll do a run at 80%-85% threshold HR, which is an ~11:00min mile.

                     

                    I was reading an article on easy running recently, and the article said that most of my "easy" runs should be at 75% of  max heart rate. Since I'm 33 years old, this would put me at an HR zone of 140bpm max, and which point, I'd be running a 12+min mile, at which pace, I honestly just feel like I should be naturally walking. There is just a natural point that it become more efficient to talk, and for me, it is about the 12:30-13min mark, at this point, I can walk faster than I can run.

                     

                    So my question is, what is an easy run when you are new? Am I doing my running at too high a heart rate?

                    LedLincoln


                      The human body doesn't like instant change, and breaks if you push it always (that means injuries). So make slight adjustments to speed or distance over a period of weeks (or months).

                       

                      This is excellent advice.

                      Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits.
                      - Mark Twain

                        never mind

                          I didn't read through all the comments but my bad if I repeat it.

                           

                          A few years ago in the army jobs website, I found out that if you integrate your workout with HIIT training then you can improve your overall running. I am not well informed about the details but I have tried it. when I started I barely could do a mile. unfortunately, i cannot find the interactive thing they posted but they have an app you could try that out. The beginning of the plan as far as I can remember was

                          - 10 mins of running

                          - rest day

                          - Interval (30 sec sprint 30 sec walk) x5

                          - rest day

                          - 10 mins of running

                          - rest day

                          - Interval (30 sec sprint 30 sec walk) x5

                          - rest day

                          - 15 mins of running

                          and so on

                          so yeah may be you can find a plan similar to that then you can do it


                          ultramarathon/triathlete

                            For me, Easy Runs are runs at what I call Conversational Pace.  If I can carry on a casual conversation with the other runner while we run, that's an easy run.   I once heard someone say they judged it by how well they could recite the alphabet while they ran.  If they were not huffing and puffing out the letters, it was an easy run.

                            HTFU?  Why not!

                            USATF Coach

                            Empire Tri Club Coach
                            Gatorade Endurance Team

                            DoppleBock


                              Welcome to running !. You are already way ahead of me when I started to run.  Every run was a hard race and I was always tired and sore.

                              Comeback #19    # 20  #21 Not sure why I am pretending to try anymore ... But here it goes again. 

                               

                               

                              badr


                                link spam
                                123