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Do you dropout of the marathon when you are having a bad day? (Read 215 times)

Longboat


Letting off steam

    In 21 years running marathons, I haven't dropped out of any once started, and I've battled though some horrible death arches through the last miles of a few. There are a couple I should have dropped out of for heat-related reasons. Boston 2012 (86* at start) f'ed me up for months because of the effort just to finish, and was probably the trigger for a major injury two months after the race. But my mistake was starting -- I should have taken the deferral.

    These days, I would not hesitate at all to drop out if I thought it jeopardize health or if during the race, something happened such that I couldn't give best effort the rest of the way. At 70 now, I must take advantage of all opportunities to run well, and I'm not going to put that at risk for future races by slogging it out in heat, with an injury, or if I get sick. I'd probably include misadventures like going way of course in that category too (I don't know how you ultra-runners tolerate getting off course and adding a bunch of miles!)

    I've also advised runners I coach to drop out if they're getting exhausted and would risk missing a lot of training time by continuing.

    Neil

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    runner

      I drop out if I'm injured, but not if I'm not hitting my primary goal. I'm not a fast runner; a back-of-the-packer who often finishes close to the race's cutoff time. I always say my participation helps pay for your prize money. So, please don't begrudge me my slower pace. I can see why a fast runner would DNF for finding themselves falling short. Personally, I'll finish, even if it's only for personal satisfaction.

      5k — 27:39 — 4/27/2015

      10k — 54:54 — 7/22/2015

      HM — 2:01:48 — 9/5/2015

      M — 4:30:59 — 10/3/2015

      50k — someday!

      runnerclay


      Consistently Slow

        DavePWN "Then all the examples are of people who don’t race at all - a completely different thing. Also it seems ridiculous to state that top-placing runners have no passion."

         

        These are statements from runners  who won or placed in races. " I stopped running marathons because I could no longer place".. I heard " since I can not win why should I run". Another runner said " I only run races with prize money".

         

        On not have passion  I misspoke.

        Run until the trail runs out.

         SCHEDULE 2016--

         The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

        unsolicited chatter

        http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

        runnerclay


        Consistently Slow

          Pretty much. Running for runnings sake.

           

          I'll take a shot at it here. I think the OP is asking - do you have to be assured of a chance of placing/winning in order to run your marathon? Or can you run it just knowing you will do your best and accept the results nowing you ran with heart? Or is there also some hybrid of the two where you don't have to have some level of assurance of success but can still go the distance regardless.

          Run until the trail runs out.

           SCHEDULE 2016--

           The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

          unsolicited chatter

          http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

          runnerclay


          Consistently Slow

            You are right. You do not need need me to understand why you stop for any reason.t. Just like most runners to do need non-runners to understand why we run. Some runners are astounded that I do not keep race medals.  I will keep my BQ qualifier award(2AG).BQ medal and 100 mile buckle.

            I'll be honest. I don't think i would run a marathon unless i felt i was in at least BQ (Boston Marathon Qualifier) shape. So far, that hasn't been a real stretch for me, but after my poor time at BM 2018 when I didn't BQ, i really wouldn't want to go to the bother if I couldn't make that cut-off.

            That's just me, and I don't care what anyone else thinks of that. You asked and that's exactly what it comes down to for me.

            Run until the trail runs out.

             SCHEDULE 2016--

             The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

            unsolicited chatter

            http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

            runnerclay


            Consistently Slow

              Sound like my world.

               

              I do mostly ultramarathons and have DNF'd a few...one where I developed heat exhaustion and another where my back was screaming and there were 30+ mph winds and I risked permanent damage. I'll put my health first but if it's just mentally a tough day I soldier on.  I'm as far from elite as one can be....queen of the DFL.

              Run until the trail runs out.

               SCHEDULE 2016--

               The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

              unsolicited chatter

              http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

              runnerclay


              Consistently Slow

                Sound like my world.

                 

                I do mostly ultramarathons and have DNF'd a few...one where I developed heat exhaustion and another where my back was screaming and there were 30+ mph winds and I risked permanent damage. I'll put my health first but if it's just mentally a tough day I soldier on.  I'm as far from elite as one can be....queen of the DFL.

                Run until the trail runs out.

                 SCHEDULE 2016--

                 The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                unsolicited chatter

                http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

                runnerclay


                Consistently Slow

                  Run until the trail runs out.---------This is my take on running. Unfortunately there are not enough of those days in my life.

                  Run until the trail runs out.

                   SCHEDULE 2016--

                   The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                  unsolicited chatter

                  http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

                  runlikeagirI


                     

                    If you pull the plug then you can recover quicker and get back to work on the next race even if you aren’t earning a paycheck.  

                     

                    Yes, this.  Thank you.

                    Size12shoes


                    Old Geezer

                      I have a good excuse. I dropped out of a marathon this past weekend (the first race I have ever DNF'd) after I pulled (maybe partially tore) a calf muscle just past Mile 2. Already saw a doctor and plan on seeing a PT as soon as it can be arranged.

                      Seattle prattle


                        Quote from Seattle prattle on 5/13/2019 at 1:32 AM:

                        I'll be honest. I don't think i would run a marathon unless i felt i was in at least BQ (Boston Marathon Qualifier) shape. So far, that hasn't been a real stretch for me, but after my poor time at BM 2018 when I didn't BQ, i really wouldn't want to go to the bother if I couldn't make that cut-off.

                        That's just me, and I don't care what anyone else thinks of that. You asked and that's exactly what it comes down to for me.

                        Quote from runnerclay:

                        You are right. You do not need need me to understand why you stop for any reason.t. Just like most runners to do need non-runners to understand why we run. Some runners are astounded that I do not keep race medals.  I will keep my BQ qualifier award(2AG).BQ medal and 100 mile buckle.

                         

                        Hey, I wasn't saying i would stop. I have never stopped in a race, a marathon, or in a workout. I wouldn't. I am saying that the only thing comparable for me is that I wouldn't enter a marathon in the first place unless I firmly believed that i could do a Boston Qualifier.

                        The reason I wouldn't stop just has to do with my fear that if i were to let that happen, I would be fighting the urge to do it in the future. So I am very reluctant to ever stop once i start.


                        Feeling the growl again

                          My competitive days are years in the past, but I can think of a few relevant examples.

                          1)  Leading a mid-size marathon halfway.  Weather front moved in halfway through, conditions flipped, and I ended up hypothermic.  But I was 2nd OA to an Olympian so I soldiered on, managed to finish, but was in really rough shape for 12 hours.  But my goal was place and I was 2OA.

                           

                          2)  Trying to get an Olympic Trials qualifier.  I had started to burn out several weeks before my race due to over-training but I committed to either get the qualifier or not finish -- the qualifier was all that mattered.  I committed myself to the OT qualifying group at Chicago and the designated pacers proved to be of incredibly poor quality, throwing as low as 5:13 pace in the first 5 miles.  I dropped off 9 miles in, stepped off the course at 17 miles when it was geographically convenient.  The pacers blew up the entire group and out of 30+ only 1 ended up qualifying.

                           

                          3)  Again trying to get an OT qualifier a few years later.  Peaked a month too early and knew it soon afterwards.  Went into my goal race and held pace through about halfway, but it was heating up and it was clear I would not get OT qualifier.  But given where I was, I could easily throttle back and get a PR, which I did, and remains my PR to this day.

                           

                          In summary, a marathon is a big commitment of time and training resources, and depending on your goal you can spin it many ways.  Gutting yourself just for a "finish" is not always the smartest option.

                          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                           

                          I am spaniel - Crusher of Treadmills

                           

                          AmoresPerros


                          Options,Account, Forums

                            There are a couple answers that are so obvious that it is rather surprising the poster couldn't figure them out for themselves.

                             

                            Continuing on in the face of adversity and poor performance is lowering the odds of achieving time or qualifying goals, and increasing the odds of injury.

                             

                            I have never been in the position of making an OTQ time or a Worlds team time, but I have seen people try to do both, and when it went south, they made what I would say is the obviously intelligent decision to drop out rather than stubbornly continue and thereby decreasing their chances of trying again within the same Olympic or Worlds window.

                            It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


                            Elite Jogger

                               

                               

                              2)  Trying to get an Olympic Trials qualifier.  I had started to burn out several weeks before my race due to over-training but I committed to either get the qualifier or not finish -- the qualifier was all that mattered.  I committed myself to the OT qualifying group at Chicago and the designated pacers proved to be of incredibly poor quality, throwing as low as 5:13 pace in the first 5 miles.  I dropped off 9 miles in, stepped off the course at 17 miles when it was geographically convenient.  The pacers blew up the entire group and out of 30+ only 1 ended up qualifying.

                               

                               

                              Ummm, maybe you should’ve run your own race rather than blame others.

                              5k - 17:53 (2019)   10k - 37:53 (2018)   Half - 1:23:18 (2019)   Full - 2:50:43 (2019)

                              RatherBRunning


                              Mel

                                I have one marathon DNF to my name. It was my local spring marathon, and it was 80 degrees and humid and no one had had time to acclimate, so there was plenty of carnage on the course. I was running slower than my normal easy pace by the halfway point, so I dropped. If I had traveled for the race, I might have tried to finish, but it wasn't worth it on that particular day.

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