1

New to running, but not working out...questions about soreness. (Read 128 times)

Lanceuppercut


    Hello everyone!

     

    I am 41 years old and have been weight training since I was 18.  Until recently, I thought cardio was some type of European food, and avoided it all together.  As I've gotten older, I found that my endurance has started to suffer.  I figured now is the best time to start implementing some cardio.  Well, that and my lady friend runs half marathons and I told her I would run one with her.  At least I'm being honest. Smile

     

    I'm 6'1" and weigh 225lbs.  I ran on a treadmill and outside for the first couple of weeks, usually in the mile range.  I'm the type of person that can't start slow, I have to jump in head first.  With that said, I ran every week day for the first two weeks without problems.  I had typical soreness, which I expected, but nothing catastrophic.  I have great running shoes, and when I run on a treadmill, I go barefoot.  Three weeks of running five days a week, I had no problems.  But recently, my knees have started to ache, and my legs are much more sore than when I first started.  I know with weight training the soreness eventually subsides, but this is completely opposite.

     

    Now I cut it back to running 3 days a week with a long break over the weekend.  On Monday, it's tough.  Wednesday it's tougher, and Friday it's almost impossible.  It's not a crippling pain, and I can force myself through it, but it's enough where I have to take a step back and maybe reassess my approach.  The last thing I want is to cause permanent damage.   If this were to have happened when I first started running, then I wouldn't freak out so much.  But since the first couple weeks weren't bad, but now after three weeks, and getting progressively worse has me concerned.

     

    Any advice will be greatly appreciated.  I know I probably should have done more research before hitting the trails, so please refrain from attacking my lack of planning.  I have really gotten to enjoy running and want it to become a life long passion.  I would hate to see it end so soon, or even worse, tragically.  Thanks!


    runktrun

      It really does sound like simply too much too quickly.  A mile a day is fine, but 5 x week might have been more than your body could handle.  Remember, your bones, tendons, and other tissues need time to recover, repair and then adapt to the new workload.  Your aerobic fitness will likely outpace your strength, leaving you with a false sense of fitness and invincibility (like the first few weeks that were great!).  The good news:  take a few days to a week off and you should bounce back.  Give yourself more than one recovery day in between runs for a while.  Try resting (I wouldn't even lift much) for a week, maybe throw in some easy stationary biking, then try progressing from running 2 days a week for a few weeks to 3 days, 4 days, etc.  And keep the pace easy.  A good metric is if you can talk without being breathless.  Of course, as you build mileage you'll be able to fit in some days where you hammer Smile

       

      Also, barefoot on the treadmill may have something to do with your soreness and discomfort.  It's just an odd combination of surface and weird mechanics.  The belt is pulling your feet back quickly, and most people try to compensate for that by over-striding.  If you like running barefoot, try a few laps around a soccer field, which is a lot more forgiving.

       

      Bottom line, take time off until you feel completely recovered, then build up even more slowly than you think you need to.  Good luck!

      Not running for my health, but in spite of it.

        Try walking for 3 miles most days then after a couple of weeks incorporate some running into a couple of your walks.  You have all your life to run far so ease into it.  Smile


        Half Fanatic #846

           

            I'm the type of person that can't start slow, I have to jump in head first.  

           

          If you want to be successful, you may want to reconsider this part.  You should seek your GF's advice - she may just know something if she runs HMs!

           

          Good Luck!

          "I don't always roll a joint, but when I do, it's usually my ankle" - unk.                          Run like the winded

           I ran half my last race on my left foot!                   "Frankly autocorrect, I'm getting a bit tired of your shirt"

          Lanceuppercut


            Thank you everyone for the feedback, it is greatly appreciated.

             

            Also, barefoot on the treadmill may have something to do with your soreness and discomfort.  It's just an odd combination of surface and weird mechanics.  The belt is pulling your feet back quickly, and most people try to compensate for that by over-striding.  If you like running barefoot, try a few laps around a soccer field, which is a lot more forgiving.

             

            Thank you for this, Kikee.  I think you're onto something.  I did most of my running outdoors when i first started.  Recently the weather has been bad, or I wasn't able to run until it was dark outside, so I did most of my running on the treadmill.  And that's when the pain started.  When i first started running, I would run outdoors 4 out of the five days, and when I ran on the treadmill, I usually did a much slower pace and focused more on my form, and breathing.  Now that I was doing almost all of my running on the treadmill barefoot, that is when I started to experience the problems.

             

            I'm going to take several days off, and go back to running outdoors.  I'll use the treadmill for emergency purposes only, but it looks like I have a lot less problems when I run outside.  It's a lot more fun, too.  Thanks again!

              Lance, consider getting a heart rate monitor and working out at a specific aerobic heart rate (like 70% MHR or an MAF) at least once a week, if not for every run, until you've built yourself up properly. If you were to try running at 70% and felt you had to walk to be able to stay at or under that heart rate, then that means your aerobic system is in poor shape. Training should make you faster at the same HR, and you should feel healthy as you go, not worn-out, injured, or sick. All your exercise (weight training, running, and whatever else you do) all adds up to your training load. Exceed what your body can handle, and you're aerobic system always pays for it first, then you start to get the injuries and the ill-health. Using a heart rate monitor and keeping track of your speed at your aerobic HR will pay dividends. If you're getting faster at the same HR, and you feel good, then the training load is working well. If you're getting slower (and this can happen) or can't improve, then an adjustment needs to be made. This can involve working slower and less time. Sometimes a plateau means you need a little more time on your feet, or some speed work. Depends how you're feeling. Good luck! 

              jackburton


                Don't run barefoot on the treadmill (or anytime for that matter except for maybe the beach lol). No wonder you're sore.  Ignore all the stuff you see online about barefoot running.  You are a new runner and need proper cushioning.  Not to mention you are 225 pounds.  I'm a larger runner also (6'3" 205 pounds right now but have been as low as 178 pounds).  Injuries are more common for me when I'm heavier, that's for sure.  Consider losing weight by diet to supplement your running.  If you are 6'1" you should be about 170 pounds when in shape, maybe less if you are a serious runner.

                 

                If you must run 5-6 days a week run 10 minutes each day for a week or so.  Then add some time. Perhaps 15 min total per run.  After a week or so, try 20 min.  Hold that for a few weeks.  Ignore pace or distance.  Just wear a stopwatch.  After a few weeks at 20 min, try 25 min.  You get the point.  The goal should be 40-45min a day for about 5-6 days, but not 7 days (everyone needs a rest day).

                 

                Make sure you are getting enough sleep (8 hours plus if possible) and eating enough carbs.  As a large guy you need a lot more carbs than the average runner.  When I first started I was not feeling very well so I upped my carbs and felt way better.  As a weight training person you probably eat too much protein.  Switch it around a bit and eat more carbs than protein.  You probably need about 80-100g tops at your weight.  You do not need 200g a day or whatever bodybuilding dot com told you.

                 

                Hello everyone!

                 

                I am 41 years old and have been weight training since I was 18.  Until recently, I thought cardio was some type of European food, and avoided it all together.  As I've gotten older, I found that my endurance has started to suffer.  I figured now is the best time to start implementing some cardio.  Well, that and my lady friend runs half marathons and I told her I would run one with her.  At least I'm being honest. Smile

                 

                I'm 6'1" and weigh 225lbs.  I ran on a treadmill and outside for the first couple of weeks, usually in the mile range.  I'm the type of person that can't start slow, I have to jump in head first.  With that said, I ran every week day for the first two weeks without problems.  I had typical soreness, which I expected, but nothing catastrophic.  I have great running shoes, and when I run on a treadmill, I go barefoot.  Three weeks of running five days a week, I had no problems.  But recently, my knees have started to ache, and my legs are much more sore than when I first started.  I know with weight training the soreness eventually subsides, but this is completely opposite.

                 

                Now I cut it back to running 3 days a week with a long break over the weekend.  On Monday, it's tough.  Wednesday it's tougher, and Friday it's almost impossible.  It's not a crippling pain, and I can force myself through it, but it's enough where I have to take a step back and maybe reassess my approach.  The last thing I want is to cause permanent damage.   If this were to have happened when I first started running, then I wouldn't freak out so much.  But since the first couple weeks weren't bad, but now after three weeks, and getting progressively worse has me concerned.

                 

                Any advice will be greatly appreciated.  I know I probably should have done more research before hitting the trails, so please refrain from attacking my lack of planning.  I have really gotten to enjoy running and want it to become a life long passion.  I would hate to see it end so soon, or even worse, tragically.  Thanks!