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Hydration question and a few misc. question (Read 185 times)

II Run II


    1.) How do you guys hydrate for a hot day (80+) when you're running at about 8 in the morning?  (roughly 40 minutes to 1 hour after you get up)

     

    Some misc. questions:

    2.) Does it usually take some time to transition into hot weather running (80+)?  Some long runs that were relatively easy suddenly became somewhat hard.

     

    3.) How bad is the pain when you have shin splints and when you have a stress fracture?

     

    Thanks.


    day after day sameness

      1, Hydration the day before is what matters. Just a glass of water before heading out. If long run (over 1.5 hour), usually will stash some water along the way, or pick route that goes by fountain.

       

      2. Yes. Acclimation happens. Takes time.

       

      3. Can be very bad. Even gentle walking can be painful, and running impossible.

      I've done my best to live the right way; I get up every morning and go to work each day...

      kjkranz


        1) Maybe a cup of coffee. For under an hour, I would probably not do anything special. Longer than that, in that heat, I would probably just bring a bottle with me.

         

        2) Generally 2-3 weeks of acclimatization before your body really starts to get great at sweating better.

         

        3) It can be very dull, or it can be quite painful.

        RunningOnTheWhiteLine.com

        Social Media Coordinator @ SKORA Running

          I love owning this bad boy: Dick's Sporting Good link to a Nathan running bottle. It stays attached to your hand without any specific effort to keep it there. It holds, I believe, 22 ounces, so it tends to tide me over for runs of up to two hours (sometimes less). As mentioned previously, courses that run past water fountains are desirable for anything over that mark.

           

          As was said, hydrating before the run is very important. In either case, the urine test is a good one. (As ex-military, this was drilled into me in boot camp, along with constant cries of "hydrate"! Haha.) Your urine should be nearly clear before you go running, and if it isn't nearly clear after you get done, well, you needed to have been hydrating more before/during.

           

          But, you know, slow down your pace until you're comfortable with the heat, and if your ability to handle it is at all questionable, stay on routes with water and other people available. I'm from Minnesota, so I understand how sudden upswings in heat can cripple you, if you're not used to it.

          MJ5


          Chief Unicorn Officer

            I get obsessive about the forecast in summer--and try to drink water throughout the day even in the days before a heat wave or before a race. As far as acclimating, yes it takes time, and personally it never really becomes easy for me...it just becomes not so hard. If it's over 85, I don't even take a watch and just go by effort. Don't be afraid to slow it down. it's been 14 years since I had a stress fracture so I don't remember it much, but my pain was more of a dull ache most of the time, and pinpoint pain to the touch.

            Mile 5:49 - 5K 19:58 - 10K 43:06 - HM 1:36:54

            Enric Hilversum


              We just got above 80F (26ªC) here in Holland, just a week ago we were struggling to reach 15-16ªC

              What you need to do is to gauge how much liquid you loose per run. The standard way is to weight yourself before a run (well hydrated) and after the run. do this a few times and you will get a good picture.

              Another good way is to use one of these scales which measure Body Fat Index and Hydration percentage. Although I have to warn you that these electronic scales vary a lot with temperature.

               

              BTW, I do never drink in any training (and I'm a relatively fast marathon runner, check out my old account "EnricM").


              Acclimatization takes some time indeed but this means that if you live (for instance) in Canada and want to race in Florida you will need some time to get used to the heat, humidity and high. It normally takes a week to get a decent level of acclimatization. For a place a few thousand meter higher (for instance from Florida to Mexico DF) it can take two to three weeks to get fully functional.




               

                1. I drink 4-6 bottles of water daily, and more when working, I work in a steel mill, so it's extremely hot. I also drink 4-6 cans of Gatorade while working. If running more than 45 minutes, I carry a water bottle.

                 

                2. I agree with others that it takes time to acclimate to the heat, be patient, slow the pace, maybe shorter runs at first.

                 

                3. Shin splints for me, has been the most excruciating pain that I've ever dealt with, even more so than my 2 previous surgeries. I couldn't hardly walk, and limped for weeks, and I stopped running for months to prevent the SFX.

                  It always seems hot here. I just bring a little extra water and yes, drink a little more before I leave.  Not much different. Can't change the weather so I just deal with it.

                    5k  = 19.48 10/1/13

                  10k  = 45.28 4/16/13

                  Half Marathon = 1:37.16 9/08/13

                  Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/12  4:39.11

                  Solo O Marathon 06/02/13  3:52:10

                  Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/13 3:40.34