10K Training Group, 8K's are welcome too

1

10K pacing strategy (Read 2546 times)


A Saucy Wench

    Hey all! I am doing an 8 race 10K points series this year. I've mostly run longer in the past couple years, so I am struggling a bit with race strategy. I am good with pacing myself for the 1/2 marathon (even pacing to slightly negative splits), and in theory the marathon. How long to hold back, how much to hold back. How much to warmup. In the 5K I started the "all out" theory a couple times and that really works for me for a 5K if I do a long warmup first (go out as hard as you can...you wont lose as much in the fade at the end as you gain from the first "too fast" mile) But I am having a hard time figuring out the 10K. So I thought I would see what everyone else does and try a few things. How do you pace for the 10K? What is your 10K warmup? Thanks!

    I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

     

    "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

      Hi NA! I am running about the same times as you, though I have no interest in the marathon (yet?) In my limited experience I find the best bet in a 10k is to cruise the first 7k at a pace I know I can hold, then ratchet up the effort in small increments each of the last 3 kilometers. To know what pace you can maintain you have to run race simulations, i.e. run 10 runs at race pace so you know for the type of course and temperature what you should be able to achieve. It is a short enough race that if you make a gross error on the slow side you do not have time to make up, but long enough to slow you significantly near the end if you go out too hard. You simply have to practise under race conditions, several times. Perhaps more experienced racers will have further suggestions... Simon.

      PBs since age 60:  5k- 24:36, 10k - 47:17. Half Marathon- 1:42:41.

                                          10 miles (unofficial) 1:16:44.

       

        Even pace works best for just about everyone whether they believe it or not. Its' not so easy to put in practice, though. The following races are my last three 10k's and and also the fastest I've run in past few years. Although I'm proud of the way I paced them, there are many, many more that I'm not so proud of. It's tough to do, but when we can it feels pretty good. 08/06/2007 – 39:36 (6:18, 6:24, 6:23, 6:23, 6:23, 6:23, and 1:22 for last .21) 09/23/2007 – 39:32 (19:43,19:49 5k splits; double loop that was slightly up and down) 11/04/2007 – 39:32 (6:24, 6:22, 6:23, 6:20, 6:23, 6:21 and 1:19 for last .21) The way even pace feels is not the way it looks on paper though. The first couple miles feel comfortably hard--more like the early part of a tempo run, but the last couple are very tough--like hard intervals without any recovery jogs.
        Age 60 plus best times: 5k 19:00, 10k 38:35, 10m 1:05:30, HM 1:24:09, 30k 2:04:33


        A Saucy Wench

          Thanks...wasnt sure if I was supposed to hold back. I think I needed a longer warmup last time. I need a looooong warmup for a 5K and even a couple miles for a half. I am a slow starter. In theory I should be able to doright near 8 but in practice not so good (of course my last 10K I had stomach flu but didnt really know it yet). I was doing well last season, but a 6 week injury hiatus (plus a few holiday pounds) have made me a tad slower than where I left off. Hard to figure my pace. Maybe I'll have it figured out by the last race of the series Big grin Base building right now...and coaching a friend through her first 30K race, so my next 10K will be a good baseline for the season. Will be starting more 10K focused training after that, although I mostly use 10Ks AS my tempo runs while doing longer training, but I am going to do a stamina phase from march-may My best "10K" to date was really a 6.9 mile leg in Hood-to-Coast. I felt like I was going all out all the way, but no idea what my splits really mean because it was REALLY hilly and very tree filled so my Garmin didnt mean $$%& Simon - not sure I REALLY want to do another marathon yet...but my training partner does and so I am going along for the ride. I'll do PDX again this year and hope I stay injury free.

          I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

           

          "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

          TexasRunner


            To answer the basic question, I would aim to start off at a pace that's about 10 seconds per mile slower than my 5K race pace. That will allow you to get off to a good start without killing yourself off on a too-fast first mile. The all-out strategy might work in a 5K because it's over relatively quick. If you try that in a 10K, it can be a long last 3-4 miles. My best 10K came with positive splits, but the 2nd half was hilly compared to the first half. On my best track 10K, I ran between 75 and 78 seconds every lap of the race. I can use up a lot of server space describing races where I went out really hard and flopped. I can also use a lot of space desxcribing near-perfect races where I held back at first. On those races, I've often wondered if I could have run faster with a faster start. I learned the hard way that the answer is no when going back to that faster start strategy.


            A Saucy Wench

              lol...10 seconds... that WOULD be all out for me. my 10K time is the one place I am significantly off the mcmillan curve. I have a 7:45 5K, and an 8:45 1/2M which tells me I ought to be able to do an 8-8:15 and so far the best I have managed is 8:30. I think I went out too slow and warmed up too little (and had too much pumpkin pie)

              I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

               

              "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                Hey all! What is your 10K warmup? Thanks!
                Forget to answer that part and it's something I consider to be very imprortant. I estimate that at least 80% of runners don't warm up enough. I like to get to the race at least an hour early and walk around, mixing in a minute or 2 of jogging here and there while checking out the area. About 45 minutes before start jog a mile, run another one at normal easy pace, then jog another. During the last mile include 2 x 30 sec at 10k race effort, and 2 x 30 at 5k race effort. Jog 30 sec between each. During the remainder of the time before the start of the race walk some more and do a little very light joggiing. Anybody: If you've never done long, thorough warmups just try it before a race that isn't that important to you as an experiment. You might be surprised at how much better you feel duirng the race. You don't want to wear yourself out by doing much fast running, but if you make the warmup on the long side with just a tiny bit of it fast, it can really make a difference.
                Age 60 plus best times: 5k 19:00, 10k 38:35, 10m 1:05:30, HM 1:24:09, 30k 2:04:33


                A Saucy Wench

                  That's about how I warmed up for my 5K - a good 3 miles with some pickups. I usually do at least 2 for half marathons and I really feel better if I warm up a lot. This last 10K I was warming up with someone else and I didnt have my watch on and I think I didnt go nearly enough. I am a true distance runner...I think the first 8 miles suck. Tongue Its good to get some of them out of the way before the race Big grin

                  I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                   

                  "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


                  Marquess of Utopia

                    Forget to answer that part and it's something I consider to be very imprortant. I estimate that at least 80% of runners don't warm up enough. Anybody: If you've never done long, thorough warmups just try it before a race that isn't that important to you as an experiment. You might be surprised at how much better you feel duirng the race. You don't want to wear yourself out by doing much fast running, but if you make the warmup on the long side with just a tiny bit of it fast, it can really make a difference.
                    I usually only warm-up 1 or two miles, I'm going to take a longer warm-up at my next race. What about cool downs? One mile, 2, 3, race right over to the massage booth?
                      I usually only warm-up 1 or two miles, I'm going to take a longer warm-up at my next race. What about cool downs? One mile, 2, 3, race right over to the massage booth?
                      Although I don't always put it in practice, I'm very high on the idea of doing longer cooldowns as well (at least 20 minutes, usually longer). This is super way to build endurance and I've also found that I recover better when I do it. If you do a 3 mile warmup, run a 10k race, then do 3 more miles for a cooldown, you've got yourself 12 miles of running in for the day. What will sometimes keep me from following this advice is getting caught up in conversations right after finishing the race. Most of time I do the cooldown, though. The sooner I start with it, the less likely I am to get caught up in distractions. A good way is to plan a cooldown with friends before the race. I've even done them with stangers that I've gotten into conversations with. While we are standing there gabbing I just say "want to jog a little?" and off we go.
                      Age 60 plus best times: 5k 19:00, 10k 38:35, 10m 1:05:30, HM 1:24:09, 30k 2:04:33


                      A Saucy Wench

                        I have to say I do recover better if I do...the only cool downs I have ever done is when I have some new runner friends running the race, sometimes after I snag my drink I will jog out to run them in. Otherwise I am good about not sitting down too soon, but bad about cooling down. My next 10k, my friend is running a30K at the same time, so maybe I'll go do a mile or so with her on her 2nd lap.

                        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                         

                        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


                        I've got a fever...

                          The most common mistake in 10ks is going out way too fast. After blasting through the first mile, there's the inevitable slowdown in the 2nd mile, and the 3rd mile usually mirrors the second. 10k pace ideally is 16~20 seconds slower per mile than 5k pace, so that's a good reference. In an ideal race, I'd aim for the target average pace for the first mile, or slightly slower. All of my best races have been run with even or negative splits, and my most heinous racing disasters have usually involved way-too-fast starts. So I think the bottom line is to resist the urge to start too fast.

                          On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.