10K Training Group, 8K's are welcome too

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33:45 10k (Read 739 times)


Just Be

    I just ran a 10k in 33:45 today on a treadmill at the gym. Based on my recent track tempo workouts, I'd say that I'm probably capable of a 35:30 10k or maybe a bit lower at the outdoor track. It's amazing the difference that running on a treadmill makes... but it's very humid and hot outside where I live, where it wasn't at all so in the gym, so I'm not sure if all of the time difference can be attributed to the treadmill making the run easier or if the huge difference is due to the more optimal environmental conditions. I guess time and more running experience will tell. My HRM confirmed that the reported belt speed of the treadmill was accurate.


    Marquess of Utopia

      I don't know how you did it. I hate treadmills; I refuse to run on them.


      I've got a fever...

        I don't know how you did it. I hate treadmills; I refuse to run on them.
        I hate 'em, too. But it's the only way to beat the summer heat and fit running into my schedule, so I'm stuck with it for now. Nice job, runner92. Get out there and race!

        On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


        Just Be

          That was the first time I've run on the treadmill since January. I just finished a full body workout at the gym and figured what the heck. The crazy thing is, it wasn't even that difficult considering how tough some of my actual past races have been... I'd say it ranked an 8 out of 10 on the RPE scale. As far as racing goes, I think my first upcoming race is going to be the 2 miler that I've been preparing for since the last one in April. It's on a really hilly course and I'm hoping to go under 12 minutes this time around.
            That was the first time I've run on the treadmill since January. I just finished a full body workout at the gym and figured what the heck. The crazy thing is, it wasn't even that difficult considering how tough some of my actual past races have been... I'd say it ranked an 8 out of 10 on the RPE scale. As far as racing goes, I think my first upcoming race is going to be the 2 miler that I've been preparing for since the last one in April. It's on a really hilly course and I'm hoping to go under 12 minutes this time around.
            You can run 33:45 for 10K (5:26/mile) and are only shooting for a sub 12:00 2-Mile? McMillan gives ~10:00 as an equivilant 2-Mile time and even on a hilly course it seems like a sub 11:00 should be well within your capabilities.

            "You NEED to do this" - Shara


            Just Be

              You can run 33:45 for 10K (5:26/mile) and are only shooting for a sub 12:00 2-Mile? McMillan gives ~10:00 as an equivilant 2-Mile time and even on a hilly course it seems like a sub 11:00 should be well within your capabilities.
              I can probably go sub 11 on the track now. I know I can do it on the treadmill. I'm just trying not to set my expectations too high. My endurance falls off a lot beyond 1 mile at the moment but I'm working on longer tempo runs now to correct that. When you add steep hills to the mix I start to crash fast at higher intensities... at least I did at the race in April... I started out at a 5:20 per mile pace thinking that was conservative and held on to 3rd place throughout most of the first mile and several hills, but after the really steep and long one at around the 8/10 mile mark I crashed and had to let up the pace, ended up finishing 8th with a time of +12 minutes. Trying to take this in baby steps, basically... since I just started again about 8 months ago after a 5ish year hiatus.
                Are you sure the treadmill you are using is accurately calibrated? Based on what you can do outside even on a track and what you can do on a treadmill I get a real feeling that your treadmill is way overestimating your speed. There shouldn't be that much difference in what you you can do on a treadmill and what you can do over ground. There is just a huge difference between a 33:45 10K and a 35:30 10K and even a 35:30 10K is better than 12 minutes at 2 miles.

                "You NEED to do this" - Shara


                Just Be

                  I'm not sure if the treadmill is calibrated properly but my heart rate monitor recorded a pace that was very close to what the treadmill reported. Like I said, I'm pretty sure I am capable of a sub 11 at the track, but I need to focus on other workouts for teh time being. The intent of the post was to get opinions between the differences between running on the treadmill vs. the track and in hot and humid vs cool and dry environments. For the longest time I thought the treadmill was pretty equivalent to the track in terms of difficulty, but I never had access to a treadmill that went faster than 10 mph. At the speed which I was running, the only things I can think of to explain the huge difference in time is that the treadmill was helping my leg enter the initial drive phase, thereby conserving energy, and all I had to do was keep up with the support phase to keep from falling and provide the recovery. Also, the cooler, more ideal environment probably helped my time by about 1 minute or more, I'd guess. In addition, I'm not ruling out the possibility that my heart rate monitor reports inaccurate speeds on a treadmill, as I calibrated it using an outdoor track ... so maybe the treadmill is inaccurate and my heart rate monitor happened to agree with the pace/speed that the treadmill was reporting.


                  Future running partner.

                    This maybe off the topic but I have one important suggestion, and you may already be doing this. Run downhill strides. Since you have a hilly 2 mile race coming up, I would focus on just trying to maintain effort and not pace on the uphill. When you run your down hill strides run them a little faster than your expected 2 mile race pace. Try to run relaxed, with the breaks off and keep your forward lean enough so your body is roughly perpendicular to the hill. Run these on a fairly gradual hill that you feel comftorble with. With some practice you will be able to really fly on the downhills without any extra effort and make up for lost time from the uphills. Wink


                    Just Be

                      Hey, that is a good idea. I haven't been doing any structured downhill repeats but I think I'll work them into my routine. I have been doing downhill overspeed ~100 meter wind sprints from time to time, and steep uphill .75 mile repeats to work on climbing power, though. But the slightly faster than race pace stuff is a good idea. Oh also, I noticed an error in my last post. I went out at a 5:40 pace at the start of the 2 miler in April, not a 5:20. I was hoping for a sub 12 back then as my secondary goal but my primary was to break 13, which I did - by a lot - so I was happy. This October the primary is a sub 12 with a secondary of sub 11 under the same pretenses.


                      A Saucy Wench

                        This maybe off the topic but I have one important suggestion, and you may already be doing this. Run downhill strides. Since you have a hilly 2 mile race coming up, I would focus on just trying to maintain effort and not pace on the uphill. When you run your down hill strides run them a little faster than your expected 2 mile race pace. Try to run relaxed, with the breaks off and keep your forward lean enough so your body is roughly perpendicular to the hill. Run these on a fairly gradual hill that you feel comftorble with. With some practice you will be able to really fly on the downhills without any extra effort and make up for lost time from the uphills. Wink
                        Yes yes yes...this really works for me. I have gotten to the point where on some hilly courses I am actually faster than on a flat course because I can fly down the downhills without tearing up my quads. More than making up for time lost on the uphills. Plus if a good downhill stretch happens early enough in the race it sets my turnover up higher and allows me to glide into a faster speed for the rest of the race with less effort. On my last HM a few people passed me on the uphill, but I passed DOZENS on the down because I let gravity do the work and keep my effort as high on the downs as I would on the flats (they arent a "rest time") They didnt repass me on the rollers later either.

                        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                         

                        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7