A-Z Recipes

12

Seeking Vegetarian Entrees (Read 997 times)

    I know we have a whole vegetarian group, but was hoping all the wonderful cooks here could give me a few ideas for some relatively easy and healthy vegetarian entrees. The less processed carbs (i.e. pasta, bread) or cholesterol (i.e. cheese, butter) the better. THANKS!! Here's my contribution, a recipe that I made up the other day to use a lot of leftover veggies that were in the fridge. Veggie Brown Rice with Tofu 1. Cook brown rice according to package instructions, substituting half of the water with low sodium vegetable stock 2. Meanwhile, sautee small cubes of extra firm tofu with 1 clove garlic in a tiny bit of evoo 3. When brown rice has about 10 minutes left, add in the following diced/cubed veggies: zucchini, carrots, broccoli, tomato 4. With 5 minutes left, add tofu and a little garlic salt 5. Serve as a main course with a salad or stuffed in a hollowed out tomato as a side.


    Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

      I have a one word answer for you: Quinoa Yummy. There are a few different recipes in there, but my introduction to Quinoa came from this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OrgnKJFO0o Basically, it's a salad that he suggests using as a snack after workouts, but my wife and I usually make it to serve alongside another dish in our meal (goes great with salmon but then you aren't going vegetarian) It works great as a stuffing for large bell peppers as well. If you want something faster that can be used as a side dish, cook up a cup of quinoa with 1/8 to 1/4 of a cup of lemon juice (with the rest of the cup of liquid being water) and before the water boils dump in some lemon peel. Cook normally otherwise. Quite tasty.

      Run to Win
      24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



        Soooooo Agree with Blaine.... YUM. It is one of the only things out there in the grain family that is considered a Complete protein, as it has all the essential amino acids. Ancient grain of the Inca's...... Wonderful staple food in my home. Very Affordable also, if you live near a Whole foods, or other Natural Organic store. Usually those places store it in bulk.... Smile

        2014 Goal : " Be my own Hero" 

         " Choose Joy"


        Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

          Very Affordable also, if you live near a Whole foods, or other Natural Organic store. Usually those places store it in bulk....
          Yeah, definitely buy it in bulk. My local grocery store carries it in the bulk section (well, one of the local grocery stores does, but we buy a pound and a half at a time to fit the jar I keep it in.) My uncle buys it boxed and pays an arm and a leg. It's even easier to cook than rice and goes with a lot of different meals.

          Run to Win
          24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)




          Needs more cowbell!

            Really, quinoa has protein? Huh...I gots to check that out.

            Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

            '14 Goals:

            • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

              I'll definitely be trying this!! Thanks Blaine!!
                Two words: Moosewood Cookbooks


                A Dance with Monkeys

                  Two words: Moosewood Cookbooks
                  What? Like stewed with tomatoes or something? Do you cut it up first?
                    from iVillage, here's one on this week's menu @ my house: Black Bean Paella An alternative to traditional paella, this almost vegetarian dish combines the mellow tastes of black beans and peas with the zing of green pepper. For a complete vegetarian dish, substitute vegetable broth for the chicken broth. Serving: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes Total Time: 25 minutes INGREDIENTS: 1/2 diced cup red bell pepper 1 15 oz can fat-free black beans, drained 1/2 cup frozen peas, thawed 1/2 cup green bell pepper, diced 2 cups spinach, chopped 1 chopped cup onion 1 minced tsp garlic 1 1/2 cup fat-free rice 3 cup fat-free chicken broth 1 chopped 15 oz can low sodium tomatoes 3/4 tsp paprika DIRECTIONS: 1. Lightly spray large saucepan with nonfat cooking spray and heat over medium-high heat. 2. Add bell pepper, onion, and garlic and cook until vegetables are soft and tender. 3. Add rice, chicken broth, spinach, tomatoes, and paprika and increase heat to high. 4. Bring mixture to a boil; reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer, 13 to 15 minutes, until liquid is almost absorbed. 5. Stir in black beans and peas and heat through. NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION: Based on individual serving. Calories: 283 Total Fat: 2 g Carbohydrates: 42 g Protein: 25 g
                      hey, sholtsman, what kinds of entrees are you looking for mainly? casseroles? stews? burgers & meaty-type satisfiers? i'm veg (mostly. i make the odd exception when i travel or if i'm sick/homesick for real pho, and i don't send a curry back if i get a whiff of fish sauce in it) & dating a vegan who cooks, so b/t us both we've got a few tricks up our sleeves. lately i've been making these baked tofu nuggets and eating them over a quinoa pilaf. very tasty, very healthy, really great source of protein & b-vitamins as a meal: TOFU NUGGETS (from You Won't Believe It's Vegan! by Lacey Sher & Gail Doherty) Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 2 (14-oz) blocks of firm tofu (i sometimes use extra-firm if that's what i've got on hand), drained & cut into 1" cubes 1/2c extra-virgin olive oil + 2 Tbs for coating pan (I spray the pan with olive oil from a mister, though) 1 T tamari 1/4 c. nutritional yeast 1 T dried thyme 1 T spike Preheat the ove to 450*. Line a baking sheet with baking parchment & coat the parchment w/ 2 T oil. 1. Place the cubed tofu in a medium-size bowl and pour the remaining 1/2 c. of oil and tamari over it; toss to coat. Sprinkle the dry ingredients over the tofu and toss again. 2. Spread the tofu cubes on the prepared baking sheet and bake for 20-25minutes, turning once during the baking process to ensure even browning. for the quinoa pilaf, i basically just throw the quinoa in broth or water and cook as normal, except that i also add a bunch of raisins, coarsely crushed almonds, peanuts or cashews, maybe some shredded coconut, and whatever vegetables i've got lying around for chopping up. usually carrots, sometimes broccoli. i like to eat both alongside some greens-- either a watercress salad (w/ radishes & apples sliced thinly and covered in pepper & lime juice) or sauteed broccoli raab.


                      running yogi

                        Apart from Quinoa, I also do a lot of bulgar pilaf and buckwheat groats pilafs. Yummy ! There are lots of recipes online.
                        I have a one word answer for you: Quinoa Yummy. There are a few different recipes in there, but my introduction to Quinoa came from this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OrgnKJFO0o Basically, it's a salad that he suggests using as a snack after workouts, but my wife and I usually make it to serve alongside another dish in our meal (goes great with salmon but then you aren't going vegetarian) It works great as a stuffing for large bell peppers as well. If you want something faster that can be used as a side dish, cook up a cup of quinoa with 1/8 to 1/4 of a cup of lemon juice (with the rest of the cup of liquid being water) and before the water boils dump in some lemon peel. Cook normally otherwise. Quite tasty.


                        running yogi

                          Really, quinoa has protein? Huh...I gots to check that out.
                          mosts whole grains have good amounts of vegetable protein. Wheat berries or cracked wheat(bulgar), quinoa, buckwheat, spelt, barley(I sure many more that I am not aware of). I try to experiment with them one at a time. I buys small amounts from the grocery bins. I have had sucess with all kinds of grain/groat pilafs.
                            Saw Emeril make this recipe on his new show Emeril Green and thought it looked fantastic!! It sounds more complicated than it looked on TV. I'll let you know how it is when I try it. Emeril's Lentil Salad with Braised Greens and Sunny Side Up Eggs 2 bunches Swiss chard 1 bunch beet greens 1/2 cup olive oil 3/4 cup diced onion 3/4 cup diced carrots 3/4 cup diced celery 1 pound French lentils, rinsed well and picked over 6 cups vegetable stock, or low sodium chicken broth 1 bay leaf 2 teaspoons salt, plus more for seasoning 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more for seasoning 3 ears sweet corn, roasted over and open flame, kernels removed 1/2 cup small-diced red bell pepper, plus 1 tablespoon for garnish 1/2 cup small-diced yellow bell pepper, plus 1 tablespoon for garnish 1/2 cup chopped parsley, plus 1 tablespoon for garnish 2 lemons, juiced 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons thinly sliced garlic 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper 6 to 8 large eggs, at room temperature Wash the Swiss chard and beet greens well. Pat dry. Cut the ribs from the leaves, chop into 1/2-inch pieces, and set aside. Cut the leaves into 1-inch strips and reserve separately. Heat 3 tablespoons of the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium high heat. When hot, add the onions, carrots, celery, Swiss chard ribs and beet ribs, and cook, stirring, for 4 minutes. Add the lentils, bay leaf, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt and the black pepper. Toss to coat lentils then add 6 cups of the vegetable stock. Bring to a simmer and cook covered, stirring occasionally, until lentils are just tender, about 20 minutes. Take care not to overcook or lentils will become mushy. Set lentils aside to cool to lukewarm in the cooking liquid, then strain in a colander. Reserve the cooking liquid for braising the greens. Place the warm lentils in a bowl and add the sweet corn, the red and yellow bell peppers, parsley, lemon juice and the extra virgin olive oil. Toss well to combine and adjust seasoning if necessary. Set-aside until ready to serve. In a large skillet over medium heat, add 3 tablespoons of the remaining olive oil. When hot, add the garlic and crushed red pepper and cook until fragrant, 30 to 45 seconds. Add the chard and beet greens, in batches, stirring between additions, until the greens wilt slightly. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add 1cup reserved stock and remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Continue to cook until greens are just tender, 3 to 4 minutes longer. When ready to serve, cook the eggs. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium low heat. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil and gently crack 4 of the eggs in the skillet. Season lightly with salt and pepper to taste and cook, undisturbed, until the white is set, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the eggs from the pan and repeat with the remaining eggs. To Serve: Serve the lentils in shallow bowls, topped with the wilted greens. Place egg on top of greens and garnish with diced red and yellow pepper. Sprinkle with chopped parsley. Drizzle with lemon juice to taste and serve immediately. Yield: 6 to 8 servings
                              This is a super simple and quick recipe. Very little clean-up. Masoor Dal This will make four small servings or two hearty servings. 1 cup masoor dal (red lentils) 2 or 3 green chilis (we've been using serranos) 1 tablespoon ghee (clarified butter) salt to taste Rinse and soak the dal. (Basically, I put the lentils in a bowl, fill with water, swoosh around and then empty the water. I do this a couple of times to get any dust off of the lentils) Finely cut the green chilis (I usually do this while the lentils are cooking). Pressure cook the dal in plain water for two whistles (or boil until soft ~ 30 minutes). Add the chilis and ghee. Add salt to taste. Let sit for five minutes, then serve. Notes: It's much cheaper to buy these lentils at an Indian or Middle Eastern grocery. When you buy them at an ethnic grocery, they will usually be labeled as masoor dal. I also have an organic/health food store nearby that sells these in bulk. They label these as red lentils. Masoor Dal = Red Lentils. I always have home-made ghee on hand, so if you don't that's the one thing extra that you might need to get or make. You don't need a full batch, so you could just melt half a stick of butter - or even a quarter, then just skim off the foam like you're making clarified butter for lobster, etc. You can also buy ghee that is premade at any indian or middle eastern grocery. I've used store bought ghee once at a friend's house and it seems to be just fine. I usually use my pressure cooker, but red lentils cook so quickly that you can boil them in a saucepan in less than 30 minutes. The other night I made this without the pressure cooker and it only took about 20 to 30 minutes to cook the lentils. Using a regular saucepan is also good because you can stop cooking when you have the exact texture that you want - it's nice when there is still a bit of shape left in the beans. Two whistles on the pressure cooker results in very soft lentils that break apart almost completely. Sometimes, instead of using serrano peppers we use a light green pepper or whichever pepper looks good from our CSA. It seems like it doesn't have enough in it to make it good, but the lentils make this dish - it's earthy and ends up tasting kind of like mashed potatoes, but better, I think.
                              ~ Mary ~

                              "Workouts are like brushing my teeth; I don't think about them, I just do them. The decision has already been made." - Patti Sue Plumer
                                Another Dal Recipe. This one takes a little bit more work, but once you've made it a few times, it becomes pretty easy to throw together. Very satisfying and special. This has replaced chicken soup as my "I need something to make me feel better when I'm sick" food. Chana Dal (or Channa Dahl or Chholar Dal or Gram Dal or some combination of these! This is really just the name for the lentils, but it's also what we call the dish since this is the traditional Bengali way to prepare the lentils.) Ingredients A cup or so of Chana Dal (You can get these at a grocery store with a good international section or any Indian or Middle Eastern grocery) - soak in water overnight (or user a pressure cooker - no soaking required). Turmeric - a tablespoon or so. Add to the cooking lentils. Olive oil or ghee (clarified butter) 2 green Indian chiles (cut off the top and then make a small slice down the length of the chile) or use a jalapeno sliced into long thin slices (use more if you want a bit more heat!) - if I use a jalapeno, I take out the seeds. I cut them big enough so that they can be removed easily at any point in the cooking process (to limit how much heat is added to the dish). The Indian chiles are pretty spicy – you can let them cook with the ingredients to add a little bit of heat, then fish them out before serving. Use one for a little bit of heat, two for a bit more, etc. If you really want to spice it up, chop up the chiles and leave them in – it's very yummy – but may be too spicy for some people! 2 tbsp of coarsely chopped fresh ginger (or more - or less!) 2 teaspoons of cumin seeds (about) 1/2 cup of unsweetened shredded coconut Optional, but really good - add some golden raisins to the saute. Watch them in the saute pan - they are ready when they have swelled up and browned just a bit. This is a wonderful addition to the dish. 1 tsp of sugar or the equivalent amount of artificial sweetener like Splenda (more or less to taste - it's not supposed to be a dessert - just have a hint of sweetness behind the savoriness of the dish. ** Don't leave this out! It really helps make this dish special!) Salt – to taste Directions for cooking: In a large saucepan, add the lentils (chana dal), a few cups of water and the turmeric. If you remembered to soak your lentils overnight, then you can probably just boil them until they soften – it will take about an hour or so. For this recipe you will want them to get soft enough so they start falling apart. I use a pressure cooker to save time. If I have remembered to soak the lentils overnight, then I only have to pressure cook for two to three "whistles" (about six to eight minutes). If I only soaked the lentils for an hour or so after work, then I pressure cook for four to five whistles (ten to 15 minutes). After the lentils are cooked to the right amount of softness leave them on low heat (stir every once in awhile to avoid letting them stick to the bottom of the pan). In a saucepan, heat the oil or ghee. When the oil or ghee is pretty hot, add the chiles (or jalapeno) and ginger and stir fry for a few minutes. Then add the cumin seeds. Allow the cumin seeds to crackle and pop. Stir for a few minutes and adjust the heat so that the spices don't burn. Add the shredded coconut and stir until it's a very light brown. If you are using golden raisins, add them at this point. Add the spices and coconut to the saucepan or pressure cooker containing the lentils and stir well. Season with salt to taste and add the sugar or splenda (just a bit). Add water if needed to get the desired consistency (sometimes we like it to be more like soup, sometimes we like it a little bit thicker) and allow to heat for ten minutes or so. There shouldn't be a clear or semi-clear broth - instead the lentils should disintegrate into a creamy broth with a few that still have their shape. If it's too watery, just let it simmer down to a thicker consistency. Depending on how much heat you like in your food, you can fish out the chiles before serving - or leave them in to enjoy! Serve with flatbreads (dip the flatbread into the soup – yum!)
                                ~ Mary ~

                                "Workouts are like brushing my teeth; I don't think about them, I just do them. The decision has already been made." - Patti Sue Plumer
                                12