Beginners and Beyond

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Yak Trax ? (Read 375 times)

BradyS71


Fast Penquin

    Dunno girl, but I am about to find out! We are getting hammered right now and I run my usual 3 at 6am tomorrow and a double of 8 in the evening. Man, I really do NOT want to run both tomorrow evening if the morning sucks! Putting on my YakTrax and hoping for the best. Should be 6-8" of fresh powder the first run.

    Of course I don't want an injury either, so if it sucks, I'll call it a day. Better to loose one day then loose a week, right?

    Good luck! I'll let you know how it goes for me. I'm putting them on my Newton Terras. I have a pair of Solomon GoreTex trail shoes but I've had them for about 5 years and wear them all winter to walk around in, so even though they look nice, I worry about how worn in they probably are. I have a sensitive right ankle that likes to let me know when I've done something I don't usually do. I worry the Solomons might make it act up on me.

     

    Just stay home on the couch, you don't need the run *jedi hand gensture*

     

    How am I going to catch up to you in the Winter running game if you are not only running twice a day but actually getting snow....  We have had such a dry year, which was nice for my HM training this summer but leads to low point this winter...

     

    Good luck and stay safe.

    Tick: I'm sure millions of viewers out there are just wondering what it's like to wear the tights of justice. Well, it's tingly and it's uncomfortable, but it gets the job done and, oh, the job of it.


    Just Keep "Tri" ing

      I've been winter running in Canada for 13 years. Depending on the year we can get a lot of snow.

      Tuesdays run started in rain, then freezing rain, by the time we got home it was snowing.

       

      Starting yesterday afternoon and overnight we got  25 inches. Apparently more on the way today.

       

      I never bothered with Yaks but when hubby started running about 10 years ago he bought

      us each a  pair. Neither of us like the way they felt on our feet. And as others said they aren't

      much good unless you are running directly on 3-4 inches of snow. I wear my normal street

      running shoes year round, with an extra pair of socks in the winter.

       

      Since most of our running is on streets after they have been plowed there wasn't much point

      to wearing them. I have trained thru the winter for spring marathons and only used the tmill

      a few times. Usually the only thing that keeps me home is freezing rain.

       

      I forget where those Yaks are now, probably somewhere in the basement. Now that the roads

      are plowed I need to get out for 10 miles before it snows again.

      8  Marathons   26 Half Marathons  9 Duathlons  6 Triathlons

      Marathons in Canada/USA/Bermuda/Ireland  Next country - Austria Sept 2014

      Marathon 4:10:48 Half Marathon 1:57:44 10K 55:44 8k 42:27 5k 25:27

       

      beycist


      inappropriate.

         

        Every Wisconsinite should own a pair!

         

        mandy, do you find your stride affected much by being in wider than usual shoes? do they force your feet to land further apart?

         

        also +1 to scrape's comments.  I tried running in yaktrax a few years ago and gave up.  I just wait for the road to be plowed.

        You suck -- Arie 3/08/14

        Sharz96


          I bought Yak Trax a couple years ago.  They are good on a pretty solid layer of packed snow and ice, but nothing else.  Useless in fresh snow--nothing for them to grab.  The only time, really, that I wear them is on forest preserve trails, with a couple inches of old snow that is packed by snowmobiles and dog walkers and all the other multi-users.  And last winter, that wasn't even once.  I don't expect to use them more than a couple times this winter, either.  We tend not to get enough snow that stays around in enough volume, to get that much packed snow.

          runmomto3boys


            Thanks, guys!   I appreciate all the feedback.  That's helpful!

             

             

            Yep, 3-6" is almost enough to snowshoe run in. And it helps pack the trail for later. Yea, studlike thinks usually work better on ice, and kahtoola microspikes are my weapon of choice on packed snow that they can dig into and get a grip. We don't have a base yet for microspikes to grab.

             

            Yaktrax are probably ok on 3-6" of snow, but avoid them on ice. Take a look at those smooth coils and see if you see anything sharp enough to penetrate hard ice. They have another version now that's like the kahtoolas, but not sure what the model name is.

             

            Great, thanks AKTrail!  I bought those microspikes on your recommendation awhile back.  I can't wait to test them out once we get a base here. Those are not good for running on ice, though?  I should use screw shoes when it is really icy out?

             

            Mandy: OMG - you weren't joking.  I thought you were! 


            Brown Noser

              I run in snow quite a bit. If it's deeper powder or packed snow, I don't need any extra traction. If it's icy, I use screw shoes (regular runners with hex screws screwed into the soles). I've never tried the yak trax, though I see them a lot in the stores here. Good luck tomorrow. Trial and error...

               

              American translation = running shoes Smile  and +1 to 'ghetto trax'...I've tried that fancy stuff and hex screws work just as well.  I slow down and shorten my stride and glide along.

               

              Paula are you a Canadian 'import'?  I thought you mentioned being from Maine originally.  I've been to a few Canadian football games and they call the players from the U.S....imports. haha

              Be careful of the toes that you step on, because they may be connected to the ass that you have to kiss.


              ORANGE!

                I live near Cleveland, Ohio, so we get our fair share of snow (an average winter is roughly 60" for my area). I live in a suburban area; most of my running is on the asphalt all-purpose path in the park or on sidewalks. The only thing I use is screws in my shoes. They seem to be the most useful for the widest variety of conditions I encounter.  When the snow gets too deep to run in/through, I head inside.

                Jenny loves to run.


                Brown Noser

                  I live near Cleveland, Ohio, so we get our fair share of snow (an average winter is roughly 60" for my area). I live in a suburban area; most of my running is on the asphalt all-purpose path in the park or on sidewalks. The only thing I use is screws in my shoes. They seem to be the most useful for the widest variety of conditions I encounter.  When the snow gets too deep to run in/through, I head inside.

                   

                  Heard that you weren't feeling well.  Glad to see you here and hope that you are feeling better.  Get well soon.

                  Be careful of the toes that you step on, because they may be connected to the ass that you have to kiss.


                  The Chairman

                    I've tried the Yak Trax once and they kept falling off. I did not like them. I haven't tried screws. I've run with my regular running shoes in snow, but as others mentioned, I try to wait for some of it to melt. A few inches of packed snow isn't bad, its the ice to worry about. Personally, and you know this, I will use the TM until I know its going to be safe to run the roads. Where I live it doesn't leave me much room on the road anyway once the plows are done plowing. You have to be very careful not only for the traction of your feet, but for oncoming cars and visibility with snow banks. 

                    It's a good point about the cars. I started out with a get a run in at all costs attitude back when I first started running. Over the years, I discovered that when the roads are a mess, the probability of something bad happening (slipping and falling, hurting an Achilles from pushing off and slipping, slipping on landing and tweaking my back trying to right myself) is unacceptably high for the benefit I might get from that run. When you throw in conditions where both I and the cars I have to share the road with may not be in full control of where they are headed, and for me that makes the choice pretty clear these days. I wait for later in the day, or skip the run altogether. 

                    Nakedbabytoes


                    levitation specialist

                      Well, it went okay. They are weird to run in, so I went slowly and it was more a "high knees" workout than a run since the plows haven't been by yet. Clear skies and lighter winds expected later today, so my longer run tonight should be a better test of how they really work for me on ice & snow that is packed.


                      "Journey" hater

                        It's a good point about the cars. I started out with a get a run in at all costs attitude back when I first started running. Over the years, I discovered that when the roads are a mess, the probability of something bad happening (slipping and falling, hurting an Achilles from pushing off and slipping, slipping on landing and tweaking my back trying to right myself) is unacceptably high for the benefit I might get from that run. When you throw in conditions where both I and the cars I have to share the road with may not be in full control of where they are headed, and for me that makes the choice pretty clear these days. I wait for later in the day, or skip the run altogether. 

                         

                        Agreed. Living in MN they do a pretty decent job of clearing the roads and paths so waiting is usually good. Which brings me to why I ditched the yak traks/screws/etc......

                         

                        I hate them on "dry" pavement and nothing I've tried works great on ice. Plus I just don't like the way they feel under my feet when I'm running. I've found that my regular shoes is just fine as long as I'm careful and slow down a bit on the snowy or icy areas.

                          American translation = running shoes Smile  and +1 to 'ghetto trax'...I've tried that fancy stuff and hex screws work just as well.  I slow down and shorten my stride and glide along.

                           

                          Paula are you a Canadian 'import'?  I thought you mentioned being from Maine originally.  I've been to a few Canadian football games and they call the players from the U.S....imports. haha

                           

                          Yes, I am from Maine.  Guess I've been up here too long.  I'm picking up some of the native language.

                           

                          Around here, we are referred to as expats.  I like the sound of import better.

                          PRs:

                          5k: 25:05 (Sep 2011)     10k: 51:57 (Aug 2012)     half: 1:56:46 (May 2013)     full: 4:19:22 (Oct 2012)


                          Run Like a Mother

                            I have the regular ones and my opinion of them is different depending on where I run.  I run primarily on a dirt rail trail and they are just fine there, but I took them on a couple of street runs a couple years ago and, while they are fine as long as there is snow (not ice) on the road, once I hit a patch of pavement they made me feel like I was not too stable as the metal coils would slide on the pavement a bit.

                             

                            I would like to try the ones specifically for running.  They have coils and removable spikes and are fit specifically for running shoes.  Does anyone have those?

                            Linda

                            Longboat


                            Letting off steam

                              Soft fresh snow, less than 6", I'd go with regular shoes (but avoid ones with mesh uppers).  Love the quietness of running in fresh snow.  I think your alternative shoes will do fine.

                               

                              If there's ice underneath, and as it gets packed down, I'll use screw shoes for better traction, and if they contact pavement underneath, no big deal.  Deep snow - probably snowshoes if available.  

                              Neil

                              ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              Nearly back to 100% 6 months after Achilles surgery. Now at 35 50 mpw.

                              Base building time!

                              tundrasusie


                                I live in the sub-arctic and honestly I never wear mine.  I have ones that are more like these:

                                 

                                 

                                The Yaxtrax with the coil hurt my feet after a long run.  Its the pounding of my frozen shoes on the coils mile after mile that just slay my feet and legs.  I wear my spikies maybe 2 a year.  I only wear then when its icy as it gives me a little traction on the ice that collects near driveways and easements.  When its just snow I find its better for me to strap on my trail shoes or road shoes with more aggressive tread and I am fine.  Snow tends to be a bit grippy ice...not so much.  I also duct tape the tops of my shoes to keep out the snow and the wind.  Last night at group run I was the one that remembered to bring duct tape.  Love that one of  my hard core guys used my hot pink hello kitty duct tape!

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