Beginners and Beyond

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Running technique - Gliders vs Gazelles (Read 122 times)

Luke79


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJWPwVF30yo

     

    Interesting analysis.  What do you guys think?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Luke79


      Aside from the fact that Faris Al-Sultan needs to put some shorts on lol, he has a huge stride.  I find that a higher turnover rate just feels better, but I don't pay attention to this when I'm going fast.

       

      I admire Chrissie Wellington, she's awesome.

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Awood_Runner


      Smaller By The Day

        I've never heard those terms beforr, but I feel like I am usually a glider, but switch to gazelle from time to time to stretch the legs a bit.

        Improvements

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        5K 31:02 Sept. 2012 / 23:36 Sept. 2013 (Same Course)

        10K 48:59 April 2013

        HM 2:03:56 Nov. 2012 / 1:46:50 March 2013

        MARATHON 3:57:33 Nov. 2013

         

        St. Jude's Hero Profile

          Right off the bat, I noticed a disconnect.  He talks about all the elites having significant vertical movement and says that's an absolute necessity when you're running sub 5:00 miles.  However, a minute or so before then, he talked about this elite female competitor running a 2:52 marathon leg in Kona.  Now my math isn't terribly great but a pace calculator tells me that a 2:52 is about a 6:33 pace.  That's sure as hell not crawling along and it's a bunch faster than I can run a marathon but it's a long, long way from a sub 5:00 pace.  Still, it's an interesting analysis.

           

          I'm curious as to how I run.  My guess is that I'm more of a gazelle because my cadence isn't up there higher than 180.  Still, my hypothesis is as it has always been and will continue to be until I see definitive evidence to the contrary.  It is this.

           

          Every human body is different.  With every step, your body makes a thousands decisions and about 998 of those decisions happen unconsciously.  What works for one person is not necessarily right for another because of many, many different factors.  Moreover, what works well for you today may not work well for you tomorrow as you lose weight, build muscle, strengthen your heart, add mitochondria, improve your fat burning ability, etc, etc, etc.  Thus, I continue to advocate what I have always advocated.

           

          Run relaxed, run up right, and let your body figure it out.  It knows better than your conscious mind what is most efficient for you and, as long as you don't get in the way, it will figure it out.

          Short term goal: 17:59 5K

          Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

          Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).

          happylily


            Run relaxed, run up right, and let your body figure it out.  It knows better than your conscious mind what is most efficient for you and, as long as you don't get in the way, it will figure it out.

             

            Well said, Brad!

            PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

                    Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

            3 years, 13 marathons, 13 BQs     

            happylily


              I've been told by someone here that I was a hamster, btw. Big grin

              PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

                      Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

              3 years, 13 marathons, 13 BQs     


              Muddling through

                Needing vertical movement as an elite is nothing but BS. Analysis of top elite marathoners shows very little vertical movement, which is wasted energy anyway as it doesn't help move one forward. In one analysis a number of american marathoners were criticized because of their vertical movement and it was suggested that they could drop their times from the 2:15 range to 2:12 or better simply by eliminating most of it.

                 

                Cadence and stride length may vary with race distance, but I see no difference in form with changes in race distance, even moving from 5K to marathon. IMO changing to a glide or shuffle when moving up to a marathon is asking for trouble, minimally a decrease in performance and possibly overuse injuries.

                2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

                Luke79


                  LTH and Dub C, somehow, paradoxically...eerily...in agreement.

                   

                  Keep in mind, this is meant to be taken in the context of a triathlon.  That is IMO the epitome of an endurance event, along with an ultra-marathon.

                   

                  LTH, do you mean that "elite female competitor" about whom you speak is using vertical movement whilst running 6:33 miles?  Because that certainly doesn't present a contradiction when you make the statement that athletes running sub 5:00 miles use vertical movement.  I may be misunderstanding your point, and if so I apologize for my lack of comprehension (wouldn't be the first time lol).

                   

                  TOTALLY agree with this though:

                   

                  Run relaxed, run up right, and let your body figure it out.  It knows better than your conscious mind what is most efficient for you and, as long as you don't get in the way, it will figure it out.

                   

                   

                   

                   

                   

                   

                    Lots to digest here.  The thing I took away is that if all elite marathoners are gazelles, than gliding is doing it wrong.  (And gazelles should have lots more floater race pics Wink)  Throw in having to swim and then bike long distances before even starting the run, with all the energy expenditure variables of those efforts, and "getting away with" a less demanding stride may become viable.

                     

                    But even comparing the footage of the elites, there are glaringly different strides.  The tall guy at the rear of the pack has different mechanics than the shorter one nearest the camera, and at that level they must be doing what works for their body almost flawlessly.

                    Goorun


                      Needing vertical movement as an elite is nothing but BS. Analysis of top elite marathoners shows very little vertical movement, which is wasted energy anyway as it doesn't help move one forward. In one analysis a number of american marathoners were criticized because of their vertical movement and it was suggested that they could drop their times from the 2:15 range to 2:12 or better simply by eliminating most of it.

                       

                      Cadence and stride length may vary with race distance, but I see no difference in form with changes in race distance, even moving from 5K to marathon. IMO changing to a glide or shuffle when moving up to a marathon is asking for trouble, minimally a decrease in performance and possibly overuse injuries.

                       

                      +1

                      this guy knows nothing about running technique. There are so many wrong assumptions in this clip, that it is laughable.

                      Slow and steady never wins anything.

                      FSocks


                      "Inspirational"

                         

                        +1

                        this guy knows nothing about running technique. There are so many wrong assumptions in this clip, that it is laughable.

                         

                        +1

                         

                        He is an idiot.

                        "I highly recommend running if you want to do marathons!"  The SL

                        Jamezilla


                        Follower of Forrest

                          Maybe better for a triathlete because it uses different muscles that aren't already tired from swimming/biking?  There is a difference between only running and swimming/biking then running.  I bet swimming and biking techniques used by triathletes differ from swimming and biking techniques used by specialists in those sports also.

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                          MYMMV


                          invisible

                            Maybe better for a triathlete because it uses different muscles that aren't already tired from swimming/biking?  There is a difference between only running and swimming/biking then running.  I bet swimming and biking techniques used by triathletes differ from swimming and biking techniques used by specialists in those sports also.

                             

                            I dunno.  I would think efficient form is efficient form, for all 3 activities.

                            GC100k


                              I'll bookmark this and come back to it when I need to adjust my technique to get from 3rd place to 1st in the Ironman.  At that point I may also need to adjust my speedskating technique for the River Styx race.

                              Luke79


                                So basically, the general consensus seems to be that this video sucks and the guy is a fucking moron.

                                 

                                Gotcha.

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                 

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