Beginners and Beyond

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Study: Runners have less risk of arthritis and hip replacement! (Read 39 times)

kristin10185


I race in SparkleSkirts

    New study shows runners have a lower rate of osteoarthritis and hip replacements than walkers, and those doing other forms of exercise, and the more miles per week the better!

     

    http://www.runnersworld.com/health/running-linked-lower-arthritis-rates-walking

    PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:21:47 (10/12/13)

     

    I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to


    Just Keep "Tri" ing

      There have been other studies over the years that proved basically the same things. It's just that non-runners

      don't want to believe them.

       

      I read one a few years ago, I believe it was from Harvard, that followed a study group for something like 20-30

      years and the runners has a significantly less percentage of arthritis and knee problems than the non-running

      group.

       

      Hell I"m 51 and have been running for 14 years (half marathons for 10 years)  without an ache or pain in my

      knees or legs. With the exception of a twinge now and then. Most of my friends in my peer group are overweight

      with knee and arthritis issues and constanly complaining about their  aches and pains.

      Marathons run in Canada/USA/Bermuda/Ireland   

      Next country for us - Austria Sept 2014 for 30th Wedding Anniversary :)

       

      Little Blue


      Grand Master for a day

        A question comes to my mind:  i wonder if it depends on how long a person has been running.  Does the person who started when they were 45 have the same level of reduced risk as the person who started at 25?  Or would those extra 20 years cause some level of degradation that can't be overcome by the exercise?

         

        I clicked on the link to the study, but I only saw a few words that I even recognized. Blush

          A question comes to my mind:  i wonder if it depends on how long a person has been running.  Does the person who started when they were 45 have the same level of reduced risk as the person who started at 25?  Or would those extra 20 years cause some level of degradation that can't be overcome by the exercise?

           

          I clicked on the link to the study, but I only saw a few words that I even recognized. Blush

           

          Just speculation on my part.  If you are running for fitness, and by that I'm talking about running 25-30 miles per week, you can do that indefinitely and not experience any problems.  If you are running for performance, putting in 50+ miles per week with hard speed sessions, there is probably a limit on how long you can continue to do so.  Are there statistical outliers?  Sure, but that would be my guess for most.

          Short term goal: 17:59 5K

          Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

          Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).