The Bike Shop

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i'm buying a bike (Read 55 times)

    I have been told that buying a bike the right size is pretty important.. I have looked at online calculators and I have an idea, but I really don't know. Is that something I will know by sitting on the bike?

    ...

    It seems so complicated. I started running about 14 years ago, so I can only vaguely remember that excitement about starting something new, I am trying really hard not to get caught up.

     

    When you go to your local bike shop, let them think you're going to buy new even if you're thinking of buying used.  They will fit you and will get you on the right size bike.  Then, you'll take note of that size.

     

    You don't need to ride the bike to have them size you for the bike.

     

    Regarding the 'complicated' part... Yes, it was a little overwhelming when I bought my first bike as an adult and learned how to use clip in pedals and wear a helmet and bike shorts and water bottles.... And the bike options!

    2014 Goals:

    #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

    #2: 365 Hours training

     

       

      When you go to your local bike shop, let them think you're going to buy new even if you're thinking of buying used.  They will fit you and will get you on the right size bike.  Then, you'll take note of that size.

       

       

       

      I completely disagree with this statement.

       

      Tell the shop you are shopping for a bike and looking at all your options. They may even have a customer they are aware of looking to sell a bike.

       

      Don't be underhanded.

       

      MTA...I wrote the above just before my run. May sound a little abrasive but not meant that way.

       

      My point is this. A bike shop is well aware of who thier competition is. And while they may sell new bikes they also sell repairs, components clothing and accessories. It's in their best interest to keep you as a long term customer. If I lost a deal to a used bike I'd still love for you to bring it to me for a tune up or even a fitting. We have stems, offset seat post etc, spacers...yadda yadda yadda. We'll look over the brake pads, check the cables, tires, and true the wheels.

       

      While any bike shop would love to sell you the sparkly new bike they also know that sometimes putting you in the right bike also means the possibility of directing you to a used one.

       

      MY LBS works with customers this way. They would not make you feel bad bringing in an ad from craigslist and asking if this is a good bike for you...Well, you might get teased alittle bit but they would give you a straight answer.

      www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building


      Needs more cowbell!

        Plus using a shop for a fitting when one's going to shop elsewhere is a bit like taking a LRS's time to try on shoes, then go buy cheaper online.  Or expecting that a restaurant should let you take up their space while you eat food from another eatery.  It's tacky, at best.

        Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

        '14 Goals:

        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


        Needs more cowbell!

          And here's another thought on buying new and/or spending more.  A new, pricier bike has built-in incentive to keep riding.  There's much greater likelihood that the bike will be the right fit for you upfront, too.  Spending half as much on a used bike might seem like a good deal, but if it's not comfortable or causes you injury.  A LBS will help tweak your bike fit even a while after the sale, if you find that you need a longer or shorter or differently angled stem, brake reach adjustments, etc.

          Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

          '14 Goals:

          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            Plus using a shop for a fitting when one's going to shop elsewhere is a bit like taking a LRS's time to try on shoes, then go buy cheaper online.  .....  It's tacky, at best.

             

            Which is why I believe that going in for a fitting at a LBS with the assumption that you're willing and ready to buy new is ok (tacky or not).

            If you walk into a shop disclosing that you have no intent to buy, they may not take care of you well and may not fit you well.  (I've run into some bike snob employees at a LBS that catered to 1 style of riding that didn't have interest in helping a novice who's looking to get fitted for used bike purchases).

            If you're going to go in for a fitting, it's best to be quiet about what you're doing (especially if you're 100% certain that you'll be buying a used bike).  If you're truly shopping and comparing the differences ($ & quality) between used and new, it's very educational.


            At, to Slo_Hand's point, if they treat you well doing what you're asking of them in supporting you through a fitting, you then return the favor by using them as your LBS of choice for (1) buying a used bike, (2) buying stuff (pump, helmet, shoes, etc.), and (3) accessories (co2, tubes, cables, etc.).

             

            Before you can treat them right, you need to know what you're shopping for, and "using them" is possibly part of the process.

            It does kind of sound tacky, but....

            2014 Goals:

            #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

            #2: 365 Hours training

             

              And here's another thought on buying new and/or spending more.  A new, pricier bike has built-in incentive to keep riding.  There's much greater likelihood that the bike will be the right fit for you upfront, too.  Spending half as much on a used bike might seem like a good deal, but if it's not comfortable or causes you injury.  A LBS will help tweak your bike fit even a while after the sale, if you find that you need a longer or shorter or differently angled stem, brake reach adjustments, etc.

              Although I understand what you're saying, I'll counter that slightly....  Although you have incentive to ride, you may realize that you should've / could've bought another bike that may have suited your desires better.

              I mentioned that I bought 3 used bikes from Craigslist before I bought my first new bike.

              I bought all of my bikes for the purpose of riding and training for triathlons.

              The 3 used bikes I bought were all different:

              1st: Hybrid bike (never biked before, and had only 3 weeks before my race... FWIW, I was more focused on learning how to swim at the time)

              2nd: used Time Trial triathlon bike that I bought about a week after my first triathlon (about 8 years old?? and eventually broke after 1 year of riding)

              3rd: used Road Bike converted to a "time trial bike" by adding an aero bar (newer bike that I was forced to buy 1 weekend due to an upcoming race and a broken bike)


              After my 3 used bikes, I bought a road bike that I quickly converted to a time trial bike.
              BUT, I had buyer's remorse after about 2 months and realized that I should've spent the extra couple hundred dollars to buy a new time trial bike.

              After a year, I ended out buying the 2nd new bike and I've been riding it for the past 2 years and enjoy every mile of every ride.

              Over Christmas, I lent out my other "new" bike to my brother in law, and will likely never have it back in my garage again.

              2014 Goals:

              #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

              #2: 365 Hours training

               

                 

                It does kind of sound tacky, but....

                 

                It is.

                 

                Walking in with no intentions to buy is completely different than going in a telling them you are considering other options. If you have no intentions to buy from them then don't freeload. And we can tell who your are pretty quickly anyway. (which might explain the poor service)

                 

                I don't want to complicate things here for the OP or any 1st time buyer but here is why you need a local bike shop that works with you.

                 

                Frames sizes vary from MFG to MFG. A 54cm in a Cannondale may not be  the same as a 54cm in a Giant. 54cm might be available from Specialized but not available on a Trek.

                 

                Some shops deal in used equipment. All shops know of customers wanting a new bike but need to sell the current one first.

                 

                Yes, some shops can be snobby. Some very good shops can have one snobby butthole. Deal with another shop or a different person

                 

                If you walk into a shop and spy a dude with a beard that took at least 3 years to grow...you are probably in a pretty good shop.

                 

                I have literally been in hundreds of bike shops all around the US. Even as a lifetime rider there are some shops that I have ventured into that make even me feel a little intimidated. There has always been a little eliteism in this industry...it's too bad for those shops. They lose a ton of business.

                 

                A good bike shop should be interested in making the pie bigger. Putting more riders on bikes and introducing other riding styles to current riders.

                 

                To the OP...I love the bike you are looking at. It gives you lots of riding options. It's covers lot's of price points with different component choices. Next weekend I will be surrounded by several of that very model while we race some Iowa Gravel.

                www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

                  Thanks for all the thoughts. I am still kind of torn between bikes. I went back to that store to take another look around and another sales person steered me away from it to a road bike. He was very nice, but then this is NH and everyone is nice here.

                   

                  There is a smaller shop where I spoke a few times with the owner. I spent quite a bit of time with him just asking questions. I have a feeling that I would get great service from him.

                   

                  I will be riding on regular roads about 95% of the time. There are dirt roads, but I can avoid them. All the roads are narrow, winding and hilly. Although, the man at the bike shop told me that the hills won't seem so big when I am riding as opposed to running on them.

                   

                  I am anxious to do some test rides.

                    DJ

                     

                    Wether you go with a road bike or a cross bike I think you'll be happy.

                     

                    The cross is going to give you a more comfortable ride but will take just a tad bit more work riding at the same speed as a mid to high end road bike.

                     

                    You won't have to avoid the dirt and gravel roads.

                     

                    It's my humble opinion that the vast majority of people out there on thier road bikes are really on the wrong bike. Very few are actually racers, they bought the bike for the social aspect or fitness reasons and arrived at thier choice because that is what everybody else is on.

                     

                    A road bike built for agility and responsiveness is a great thrill to ride. To go into a corner and lay that sucker over and have it stick to the road is beyond description. To literally feel it jump from under you when you stand up and hammer into a sprint is exihlarating. To not experience these things because you only go out on a Sunday ride with a friend is almost a waste of money.

                     

                    On the other hand, to throw a leg over a bike as you head out for a 3 hour tempo ride where you don't have to worry about the road surface is pretty cool too. Pulling into to your drive not feeling beat up but like you got a good workout in and not trying to work knots out of your back is awesome.

                     

                    The difference between the cross and a pure road is really pretty minimal to the recreational rider. On the other hand, I wouldn't take my road bike to the renegade Gents race next weekend nor would I take my cyclocross to the Crit this June.

                     

                    Bikes are like shoes!

                    www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

                      So your saying......GET BOTH

                       

                      I have to say that if I were to get a bike now aftrer what I know (yeah, very little still) I think I would go with a cross bike before what I have now. My first was a Felt F15 which at the time was basically their race bike. I didn't need that but got a great deal on it.

                       

                      Today my riding consists of commuting for work, leisure riding and some training for triathlon. I have a tri bike  so more of my training will be on it. The extra cost in effort of a training ride on a cross bike would  only be benefitial in my mind as a training aide such much like using a mesh suit for extra swimming resistance or bumbing up the incline on the dreadmill.

                       

                      Damn, maybe I should start looking for a new to me cross bike, my wife should love that.

                       

                      DJ

                       

                      Wether you go with a road bike or a cross bike I think you'll be happy.

                       

                      The cross is going to give you a more comfortable ride but will take just a tad bit more work riding at the same speed as a mid to high end road bike.

                       

                      You won't have to avoid the dirt and gravel roads.

                       

                      It's my humble opinion that the vast majority of people out there on thier road bikes are really on the wrong bike. Very few are actually racers, they bought the bike for the social aspect or fitness reasons and arrived at thier choice because that is what everybody else is on.

                       

                      A road bike built for agility and responsiveness is a great thrill to ride. To go into a corner and lay that sucker over and have it stick to the road is beyond description. To literally feel it jump from under you when you stand up and hammer into a sprint is exihlarating. To not experience these things because you only go out on a Sunday ride with a friend is almost a waste of money.

                       

                      On the other hand, to throw a leg over a bike as you head out for a 3 hour tempo ride where you don't have to worry about the road surface is pretty cool too. Pulling into to your drive not feeling beat up but like you got a good workout in and not trying to work knots out of your back is awesome.

                       

                      The difference between the cross and a pure road is really pretty minimal to the recreational rider. On the other hand, I wouldn't take my road bike to the renegade Gents race next weekend nor would I take my cyclocross to the Crit this June.

                       

                      Bikes are like shoes!

                       

                      The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                       

                      2014 Goals:

                       

                      Stay healthy

                      Enjoy life

                       

                         

                        A road bike built for agility and responsiveness is a great thrill to ride. To go into a corner and lay that sucker over and have it stick to the road is beyond description. To literally feel it jump from under you when you stand up and hammer into a sprint is exihlarating. 

                         

                        On the other hand, to throw a leg over a bike as you head out for a 3 hour tempo ride where you don't have to worry about the road surface is pretty cool too. Pulling into to your drive not feeling beat up but like you got a good workout in and not trying to work knots out of your back is awesome.

                         

                         

                        This is a difficult decision. I keep going back and forth.

                          Big grin

                           

                          I know...boy do I know.

                           

                          How would you like to head out the door for work and have to look at 7 bikes and decide which one you are going to ride today?

                           

                          That decision ain't easy either.

                          www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

                            Big grin

                             

                            I know...boy do I know.

                             

                            How would you like to head out the door for work and have to look at 7 bikes and decide which one you are going to ride today?

                             

                            That decision ain't easy either.

                             

                            Eenie, meenie, miney, mo?

                              I am leaning towards this bike. I felt pretty comfortable on it. He didn't have my size, but the bigger bike still felt good.

                               

                                DJJan,... thief Smile

                                2014 Goals:

                                #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                                #2: 365 Hours training

                                 

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