Drinkers with a Running Problem

Home Brewers... (Read 1559 times)

    we have an extra fridge just for lagering, plus plenty of garage/basement space.  Won't be the first go around either.  we've done a handful of brews from kits and a couple more all grains. 

     

    Just looking for something different this time around. a cream ale?  that might work.  got an all grain recipe? 

    nothing to see here.  


    Prince of Fatness

      Cream Ale is the ale answer to the mass produced lagers.  I see that you are from Ohio.  Ever have Little Kings, or Genny Cream Ale?  SImple.  Cheap. Easy.  It's basically base malt and corn and / or rice.  I plan on brewing one this summer, but I am going to use potatoes (I grow my own so I am just going to do it for the fun of it with the spuds from my garden).

       

      Lots of good info for a recipe here.

      Semi-retired.

        you can use potatoes for beer making?  now that's cool. 

        nothing to see here.  


        Idiot

          Here are the bottles in the oven.  I covered the tops with foil, put them in, and set it on time bake.  I took them out once they cooled.  I could fit 32 bottles so I did 2 loads.  This worked great.  It was easy, there was no mess, and as long as you leave the foil on the lid you can do it ahead of time.

           

          I can't see the pictures, but I think I'm quoting what I remember seeing.

           

          I've soaked my bottles to remove the labels, cleaned the outside and will clean the insides over the next few days.  When you did the process above, was that to sanitize?  I assume you did this on relatively low heat, as well?

           

          I'll probably be bottling on Monday, since I took the day off work.

          I decided that if I'm going to call myself a runner, I should probably run.


          Prince of Fatness

            I've soaked my bottles to remove the labels, cleaned the outside and will clean the insides over the next few days.  When you did the process above, was that to sanitize?  I assume you did this on relatively low heat, as well?

             

            Yes, it was to sanitize.  I put the foil on and bake them in the oven at 325 degrees for about 2 and a half hours.  Let the bottles cool for a while before taking them out of the oven.  You can do this ahead of time.  As long as you leave the foil on the bottles will stay sanitized.

             

            For taking the labels off you can't beat oxyclean (get the unscented stuff).  That cleans them, too.  As I take the labels off I scrub the insides with a bottle brush, then rinse thoroughly.

             

            When I have a homebrew, I rinse the bottle thoroughly immediately after pouring the beer into a glass.  Once they dry I store them upside down in a case box.  No need to use cleaner if you rinse right away.

             

            I've done this for all of my batches of beer without a problem.

            Semi-retired.


            A Dance with Monkeys

              So.  Serious question.  What are you trying to kill by that oven method?

               

              I ask because dry heat does not kill much.  AND because very little can actually get into beer bottles and ruin the beer, despite all the energy the beer-book writers and beer-equipment vendors spend telling you that even a misplaced breath of air will destroy your beer and your entire apparatus.

               

              Me?  I usually just run hot water in each bottle twice.  Occasionally, I have to scrape out a cockroach.  Never had a spoilage problem in over 20 years.

               

              But, if you are serious about baking bottles, I would put them in the oven with a bit of water in them.  Steam kills.  Dry heat does not.


              Prince of Fatness

                So.  Serious question.  What are you trying to kill by that oven method?

                 

                I ask because dry heat does not kill much.  AND because very little can actually get into beer bottles and ruin the beer, despite all the energy the beer-book writers and beer-equipment vendors spend telling you that even a misplaced breath of air will destroy your beer and your entire apparatus.

                 

                Me?  I usually just run hot water in each bottle twice.  Occasionally, I have to scrape out a cockroach.  Never had a spoilage problem in over 20 years.

                 

                But, if you are serious about baking bottles, I would put them in the oven with a bit of water in them.  Steam kills.  Dry heat does not.

                 

                Well, I got the idea here.  The wording in there implies that it just takes longer to kill with dry heat.  And yes, I have tried rinsing the bottles before which leaves a little water in them. 

                 

                I don't want to get into a science argument.  I have done it this way since day one and it works for me.  I do not find it very difficult or tedious.  I set the oven on time bake and forget it.  The next day I take the bottles out.  There is no mess.  It works.

                 

                I brew my beer out in a messy garage, so be assured that I am not paranoid about sanitation, but I do like the idea of sanitizing the bottles before I use them.

                Semi-retired.


                Prince of Fatness

                  Speaking of brewing beer it's time to think spring.  Sunday I will be brewing a Belgian Wit.  Can't wait.

                  Semi-retired.


                  Prince of Fatness

                    Good thing that I rigged a blow off tube, or the wit would have blown the lid.  That thing is going nuts right now.

                     

                    Semi-retired.


                    A Dance with Monkeys


                    Prince of Fatness

                      That the wit?

                       

                      Yeah, it's hard to tell but the hose was filled with krauzen.  If you look at the jug you'll see that the liquid is brown.   Add to that this beer is very light in color.  No specialty grains ... just base malt, wheat malt, and flaked wheat.

                       

                      This was interesting.  I pitched a starter Saturday and by Sunday noticed more krauzen than usual.  Brewed Sunday, pitched, and had air lock activity within 6 hours.  By Monday evening it had stopped.  It was never that vigorous so I searched the net for ideas.  Found lots of hits indicating that the yeast is slow and really likes to sit on top of the beer, also lots of krauzen.  So I gave the bucket a gentile swirl and within an hour it was back at it.  Same thing yesterday, except when it started back up this time it really took off.  It's pretty cool seeing all of that gunk pushed through the tube.

                       

                      I always use blow off tubes and this is why.  You never know.

                      Semi-retired.

                        Yep, spring time. Start to think about brewing again.

                         

                        Anyone have a all grain, IPA recipe for 5 gallons. Would really like something along the lines of a Sweetwater IPA.


                        Prince of Fatness

                          Anyone have a all grain, IPA recipe for 5 gallons. Would really like something along the lines of a Sweetwater IPA.

                           

                          I just bottled my first IPA, but it's an Arrogant Bastard clone (sort of).  The sample tasted good when I bottled (just Tuesday) but I haven't tasted it carbed yet.  I keep my recipes out on hopville.com.  The recipe is here.

                          Semi-retired.

                            thanks, haven't been to that site, did check out a couple of recipes on homebrewtalk.com.


                            A Dance with Monkeys

                              Oldman, where do you get your supplies?