Drinkers with a Running Problem

Home Brewers... (Read 1605 times)


Prince of Fatness

    I'd drink both of those.

     

    Thinking that I can get a small box out that way after the holiday and should be able to include both of these.

    Semi-back-at-it. 


    Feeling the growl again

       

      Thinking that I can get a small box out that way after the holiday and should be able to include both of these.

       

      Sigh.  I have two empty boxes to fill and send back.  No rush.  I've been avoiding the beer store as my primary dieting method.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       

      I am spaniel - Crusher of Treadmills

       


      Prince of Fatness

        There's no avoiding me, alas.

        Semi-back-at-it. 


        Country Fried

          Well cripes. The ferment was very active, then stopped @ 1.130, which is ~7% ABV so far. The yeast is rated to 20-25%. Have aerated like nuts. Gonna get some yeast nutrient today and add it.

           

          So I eventually got this BAB (big ass barleywine) down to ~8.5 gal at 1.030, with a few additions of more DME, O2 blasts and several yeasts with nutrients. I actually think it got too dry, but I can fix that later. I then freeze concentrated it down to 5.25 gallons this week. Holding onto the water side just in case. I'll put it into a 4th use barrel in the next week or so. (Prior uses: Tuthilltown Rye, followed by an Imperial Mole-style stout, followed by a King Henry clone barleywine that was finished with toasted coconut, and now has had an old ale in it for about a year). I estimate the ABV is ~23-28%, but will send it off for testing. The booziness character is very low. Thinking about finishing it with some dark or dried fruits that will add flavor and sweetness but not more alcohol, and bottling it flat.


          Feeling the growl again

             

            So I eventually got this BAB (big ass barleywine) down to ~8.5 gal at 1.030, with a few additions of more DME, O2 blasts and several yeasts with nutrients. I actually think it got too dry, but I can fix that later. I then freeze concentrated it down to 5.25 gallons this week. Holding onto the water side just in case. I'll put it into a 4th use barrel in the next week or so. (Prior uses: Tuthilltown Rye, followed by an Imperial Mole-style stout, followed by a King Henry clone barleywine that was finished with toasted coconut, and now has had an old ale in it for about a year). I estimate the ABV is ~23-28%, but will send it off for testing. The booziness character is very low. Thinking about finishing it with some dark or dried fruits that will add flavor and sweetness but not more alcohol, and bottling it flat.

             

            Cripes.  I'd drink that too.

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             

            I am spaniel - Crusher of Treadmills

             


            Country Fried

              I think in some ways this will come across the palate like a fortified beer, akin to a fortified wine. The making process is very different though.


              Prince of Fatness

                I'd drink that too.

                 

                Was wondering how that one was coming along.

                Semi-back-at-it. 


                Country Fried

                  I'm thinking that it ought to be ready in 12-24 months.


                  Prince of Fatness

                    Amazingly I went almost two whole weeks without having a batch of beer sitting somewhere in the house in a bucket or carboy.  Well, that ended yesterday evening.

                     

                    Oatmeal Saison (11 qt)

                     

                    3 lb US 2 row

                    1 lb Oat Malt

                    1 lb Flaked Oats

                     

                    Hops all German Hallertau (4.5% AA)

                     

                    .5 oz 60 minutes

                    .5 oz 15 minutes


                    Wyeast French Saison (3711) no starter.

                     

                    Mash 148 for an hour. Boil an hour. Chill and pitch yeast.  After a day ramp up the temperature to 70+ degrees.  This should not be difficult given that we are forecast for a warm spell.

                     

                    I've added oats to a wit and was happy with the results so I figured why not get a little more heavy handed and brew a saison with them,

                    Semi-back-at-it. 

                    gusgordon


                    Taint of Steel

                      Amazingly I went almost two whole weeks without having a batch of beer sitting somewhere in the house in a bucket or carboy.  Well, that ended yesterday evening.

                       

                      Oatmeal Saison (11 qt)

                       

                      3 lb US 2 row

                      1 lb Oat Malt

                      1 lb Flaked Oats

                       

                      Hops all German Hallertau (4.5% AA)

                       

                      .5 oz 60 minutes

                      .5 oz 15 minutes


                      Wyeast French Saison (3711) no starter.

                       

                      Mash 148 for an hour. Boil an hour. Chill and pitch yeast.  After a day ramp up the temperature to 70+ degrees.  This should not be difficult given that we are forecast for a warm spell.

                       

                      I've added oats to a wit and was happy with the results so I figured why not get a little more heavy handed and brew a saison with them,

                       

                      Is Hallertau a typical hop variety for a saison?

                      gusgordon


                      Taint of Steel

                        Also, very curious about how the mouthfeel provided by oats will turn out in a saison.


                        Prince of Fatness

                          Is Hallertau a typical hop variety for a saison?

                           

                          Yeah you want an earthy, spicy hop to stay true to style.  I stuck with that because I am really looking to see what I get from the oats.

                          Semi-back-at-it. 

                          gusgordon


                          Taint of Steel

                             

                            Yeah you want an earthy, spicy hop to stay true to style.  I stuck with that because I am really looking to see what I get from the oats.

                             

                            Cool.  I wasn't questioning your judgment, I just didn't know what was typical for the style.  That makes sense.


                            Prince of Fatness

                              Cool.  I wasn't questioning your judgment, I just didn't know what was typical for the style.  That makes sense.

                               

                              The BJCP guidelines are a good reference for what is typical.

                               

                              http://www.bjcp.org/stylecenter.php

                               

                              There's a PDF link in there.  They used to have a web page version but I noticed that they just switched from 2008 to 2015.  I noticed that these new guidelines are more flexible than the prior ones.  Makes sense because I am guessing that most craft beer that you buy doesn't adhere to one particular style.  I've used these many times as a starting point when brewing.

                              Semi-back-at-it. 

                              gusgordon


                              Taint of Steel

                                 

                                The BJCP guidelines are a good reference for what is typical.

                                 

                                http://www.bjcp.org/stylecenter.php

                                 

                                There's a PDF link in there.  They used to have a web page version but I noticed that they just switched from 2008 to 2015.  I noticed that these new guidelines are more flexible than the prior ones.  Makes sense because I am guessing that most craft beer that you buy doesn't adhere to one particular style.  I've used these many times as a starting point when brewing.

                                 

                                Cool, thanks.