Low HR Training

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LHR Training Questions (Read 374 times)

    Hello All. Just wanted to run some things by the pros here on the LHR Forum.

     

    I've been training by the Maffetone Method since the beginning of the year (roughly 13 weeks) and I'm enjoying it. I haven't seen quick results, but it's been good all the same. I've lost around 4 pounds and my resting HR has dropped to 47 some mornings. I can run for an hour without feeling like I'm expending that much effort. I feel like I could do the whole workout again.

     

    I recently signed up for my first race (10K) and had the goal of a sub-70 minute finish. You can check my profile for the outcome. I started out slow (maybe too slow) and finished really strong (maybe over did it a bit with a 205 finishing HR.) I finished in 65:48 and was happy with the result. Since the race, I've been moving and have taken a little time off.

     

    Here are my questions:

     

    1. The new place has a tread mill and today I tried to use it for the first time. My Garmin footpod was all over the place as far as pace is concerned. I thought it was going to be great to just set the tread mill's speed and maintain control over my heart rate, but it ended up being more stressful. Is the treadmill a viable option for the Maffetone Method? I guess if I just forgot about pace and focused on HR it would be fine, but I wanted to check.

     

    2. I'm currently a quarter of the way through The Big Book of Endurance Training. I believe all of Dr. Phill's points are right on, but I'm having an issue with the diet part of the method. I tried to simply cut back my carb intake one day and found it nearly impossible. I don't overload...I try to balance. Are the drastic dietary steps necessary in other people's experience? I want to increase my aerobic function, but to be honest strict dieting would be a stumbling block for me.

     

    3. I know it was wrong to push myself at the end of the race. I know running at my maximum HR is dangerous. I have another race scheduled for this June (another 10K.) How should I approach that race differently than the one last week? If I were to stick to my training HR I would finish after the time limit. I planned on keeping it slightly elevated, but couldn't slow down my HR once the race had started. In the end I gave in and used the strength I had reserved in the first half to push it hard. 

     

    Thanks for taking the time to read this. It's late here in Japan, so I apologize for any rambling...

      Hi,

       

      1. Not sure why you are worried about the footpod (you dont trust the treadmill speed readout?)

      I guess either way, yeah, run by HR, adjust the speed to get the HR you want.

      I don't do a lot of TM running myself, but when I do I just set it at a speed that feels easy and adjust up slowly as I warm up to MAF.

      Many people use the TM for MAF testing.

       

      2. I haven't done the two week test myself, as I too found it a bit extreme, but it's not a diet - you do add back carbs gradually after the test.

      As with most books (and life I guess!) I tend to take on the bits that seem to make sense for me.  I may do the test at some stage if I feel I need to.

      Many here have done the test, so can offer better advice than I.

       

      3. I'm not sure I would agree that running your max HR is dangerous (if you are fit and don't have any heart issues).

      I usually get to/close to max HR at the end of (shorter) races.  Do you mean you intended to race at your MAF?

      Also, are you sure 205 is your max?

      Most people here would race at a far higher HR than their MAF (unless doing ultra endurance races).

      For me, racing is about pacing myself by feel, I only pay a little attention to HR. 

       

      Cheers,

      Sean

         

         

        Here are my questions:

         

        1. The new place has a tread mill and today I tried to use it for the first time. My Garmin footpod was all over the place as far as pace is concerned. I thought it was going to be great to just set the tread mill's speed and maintain control over my heart rate, but it ended up being more stressful. Is the treadmill a viable option for the Maffetone Method? I guess if I just forgot about pace and focused on HR it would be fine, but I wanted to check.

         

        2. I'm currently a quarter of the way through The Big Book of Endurance Training. I believe all of Dr. Phill's points are right on, but I'm having an issue with the diet part of the method. I tried to simply cut back my carb intake one day and found it nearly impossible. I don't overload...I try to balance. Are the drastic dietary steps necessary in other people's experience? I want to increase my aerobic function, but to be honest strict dieting would be a stumbling block for me.

         

        3. I know it was wrong to push myself at the end of the race. I know running at my maximum HR is dangerous. I have another race scheduled for this June (another 10K.) How should I approach that race differently than the one last week? If I were to stick to my training HR I would finish after the time limit. I planned on keeping it slightly elevated, but couldn't slow down my HR once the race had started. In the end I gave in and used the strength I had reserved in the first half to push it hard. 

         

        Thanks for taking the time to read this. It's late here in Japan, so I apologize for any rambling...

         

        Hi Joshua,

         

        Congrats on your nice 10k time.

         

        1) The treadmill will be more stressful for a few reasons. When you run outside through the air, there is a natural cooling that happens. You don't move through the air on a TM. A fan or two can help with this. Also, depending on the room,  temperature and humidity can build as you run. In my TM room, if I start out at 70°, by the end of an hour run, the room will be 5 degrees warmer and the humidity a little higher. This is partially due to the fan circulating the dissipating heat and moisture coming from my body. I've done extensive training on the TM, and it works just as well as outside, though eventually, outdoor work on uneven terrain needs to be done.

         

        2) Dr. Phil's suggestions on diet should be taken as a nudge toward eating better carbs, not lesser carbs. Though you might find that you don't need to eat as much carbs overall. My experience with attempting the two-week tests have not been good ones, as I didn't get enough carbs in and ended up in a glycogen depleted state. My diet need to be at least 55% carbs or I suffer for it. Some can get by on less, some need more. The key is to try to get carbs from sources that don't spike your insulin. Grains, veggies, fruits. Food with a good amount of fiber in it. Cut back on refined sugar and flour as much as possible---though I leave room for the occasional ice cream or cookie, because life is better with ice cream and cookies, and it's not so much fun being so controlled all the time. The key is to not overdo it. It makes sense to eat better---make sure you are getting all the macro and micro nutrients you need in a form that doesn't leave you with type 2 diabetes.

         

        3) I agree with Sean, running at MHR is not inherently dangerous. You can only do it for a very brief amount of time anyway before your brain shuts you down. If your heart was pumping near MHR at rest, that would be a dangerous state, and I've known that  to happen to people (runners and non-runners). Anyone who has a heart attack or some shut-down, had a problem going into the race, and something would have happened anyway. A well run 10k is run at about 92-93%MHR average. The first mile would be less than that HR, and the last would be more, with your HR reaching near MHR at the end as you sprint (if you choose). 

         

        Sounds like MAF training is suiting you well. Keep going!

         

        --Jimmy

        log   prs      Crusted Salt comic #142

         

          Thanks for the responses! I'm very encouraged. The treadmill is a new thing for me, but it's serving it's purpose; namely a place to run while I wait for the snow to melt. I do trust the speed on tempe Treadmill, but I want my Garmin to reflect that as well. For instance, tonight my treadmill read 8.0km/hr (12:00 min/mile.) My footpod read a 10:52 min/mile. That's a big discrepency. But it's not that important when I shift focus to time run at my MAF. I'm glad you all confirmed the MHR thing. I have no heart issues and I still felt great after finishing the race. It was at 205 for around 4-5 minutes...right up to the finish line. There's no way I would meet the deadline running at my MAF! I used my knowledge of my MAF, signals from my body, and common sense to pace myself throughout the race. Thanks again for the encouragement.