Low HR Training

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Can someone check my math and answer another question? (Read 451 times)

Shiksa


Aerobigal! (thx Jimmy!)

    I know I'm not supposed to overthink this, but moving beyond just putting my shoes on and going out the door has caused a slight brain freeze. I figured out my Maff HR by subtracting my age from 180 and then subtracting 5. I ended up with 150. Yesterday, on the treadmill I ran at mostly 130-138. Not sure why I got it in my head that 130 was then number, but I did. So, what is my range for my workout. Jimmyb mentioned on the slow twitchers thread that I should increase volume by 5% or so each week (?). What does this mean Jimmyb? (I'll share my girly music next time too!) And do I understand aerobic intervals to be highs and lows not exceeding my Maff hr at this time? Is there a written "plan" like when I did Hal's 1/2 program that fits within the low HR training plan? IE: Assume all within low HR range: Mon - rest Tues - 3.5 miles Wed - 2 miles Thurs - 3.5 miles Fri - rest Sat - 4.5 miles Sun - 6 miles This closely mirrors what happens in my life these days.
    Stacy
    I make no apologies for my liberal use of smiley icons. http://stacyruns.wordpress.com/
      I know I'm not supposed to overthink this, but moving beyond just putting my shoes on and going out the door has caused a slight brain freeze. I figured out my Maff HR by subtracting my age from 180 and then subtracting 5. I ended up with 150. Yesterday, on the treadmill I ran at mostly 130-138. Not sure why I got it in my head that 130 was then number, but I did. So, what is my range for my workout. Jimmyb mentioned on the slow twitchers thread that I should increase volume by 5% or so each week (?). What does this mean Jimmyb? (I'll share my girly music next time too!) And do I understand aerobic intervals to be highs and lows not exceeding my Maff hr at this time? Is there a written "plan" like when I did Hal's 1/2 program that fits within the low HR training plan? IE: Assume all within low HR range: Mon - rest Tues - 3.5 miles Wed - 2 miles Thurs - 3.5 miles Fri - rest Sat - 4.5 miles Sun - 6 miles This closely mirrors what happens in my life these days.
      Maffetone suggests a range of MAF -10 to MAF (for you 140-150), but going lower is fine. I'll use a range of MAF-15 to MAF -5 on recovery runs, and Maf -20 to MAF on medium long and long runs. That 5% was a suggested rate at which to increase time or mileage volume (if you are looking to do so). Add the increase to your hard days, which should be followed by easy days (low mileage or time or rest). I your case, add it to your Tues, Thurs, and Sunday runs. Always keeping an eye on how your body is responding and backing off or leveling out for awhile if you are showing signs of overtraining (such as injuries, sickness, and being a irritable bastard all the time). Every 4th week, take a recovery week by adding a rest day and/or cutting miles or time by 20-50%. The following week resume building. In essence you are creating your own training schedule within the MAF guidelines. The aerobic interval "high" or upper limit is the MAF you are using now ((180-age)-5). Keep going! --Jimmy
      Shiksa


      Aerobigal! (thx Jimmy!)

        So, do you think I could essentially "plug in" my low HR training to any training plan? At this time, I don't intend to run 100 miles at a time so there is a point where I won't be adding more mileage. Increasing now does make sense because I'm working up to another 1/2 at the end of March. Your suggested 5% increase is similar to Hal's beginning 1/2 program where the mileage increases each week typically on the days you mentioned. I have to admit though, last time, I didn't bother with things like recovery runs, tempo, speedwork, or similar. I just followed the increases as suggested treading water for several weeks since I had the baby. I took a 12 week training program and stretched it into 6 months just to make sure I was training safe and feeling good. I guess at this time though, I'm only supposed to be base building right? I understand that I am not supposed to exceed my MAFF max Hr, so any "speedwork" or "tempo" runs I speak of please assume that I am running within those guidelines. Would it make sense to do two speedwork sessions within the week while increasing? I think my current aerobic fitness is reasonable. It's not remarkable in any way so there is plenty of work to do. I'm just trying to tweak a training plan. Having it all laid out for me helps to motivate me and it's easier for me to keep track of.
        Stacy
        I make no apologies for my liberal use of smiley icons. http://stacyruns.wordpress.com/
          So, do you think I could essentially "plug in" my low HR training to any training plan? At this time, I don't intend to run 100 miles at a time so there is a point where I won't be adding more mileage. Increasing now does make sense because I'm working up to another 1/2 at the end of March. Your suggested 5% increase is similar to Hal's beginning 1/2 program where the mileage increases each week typically on the days you mentioned. I have to admit though, last time, I didn't bother with things like recovery runs, tempo, speedwork, or similar. I just followed the increases as suggested treading water for several weeks since I had the baby. I took a 12 week training program and stretched it into 6 months just to make sure I was training safe and feeling good. I guess at this time though, I'm only supposed to be base building right? I understand that I am not supposed to exceed my MAFF max Hr, so any "speedwork" or "tempo" runs I speak of please assume that I am running within those guidelines. Would it make sense to do two speedwork sessions within the week while increasing? I think my current aerobic fitness is reasonable. It's not remarkable in any way so there is plenty of work to do. I'm just trying to tweak a training plan. Having it all laid out for me helps to motivate me and it's easier for me to keep track of.
          If you're following the Maffetone method, then you do no speedwork for at least 12 weeks or more. Looking at you current speed, more might be applicable. If you start doing twice a week speed sessions, then you are doing some other method, or have entered the anaerobic phase of the Maffetone method, which might or might not be too soon for you. You have to decide. Make an honest self-assessment of your current fitness, health, and progress. You have to be the judge and juror of what you are doing, why you are doing it, and how your body is responding. Think about what it is you truly want to achieve, then educate yourself on the available training methods out there, then make an educated choice. If you are interested in the Maffetone method, then I suggest you not rely on me or anyone in this forum for the information. Read the books. Once you decide what it is you are trying to do, trying to achieve, then make a choice of training method, and follow it through to the end, and see how it works. See it if helped you achieve your goals, and didn't sacrifice your health getting there. I came to the MAF method through trial and error. Experimentation. I've tried several ways off training, and have found this to be the best for what I am trying to achieve, and for my health. If you truly decide to do the Maffetone method, then just follow what it says in the book, commit, don't whine, and see what happens. If you choose to modify it, then do that. Whatever. It's your journey. --Jimmy
          Shiksa


          Aerobigal! (thx Jimmy!)

            If you truly decide to do the Maffetone method, then just follow what it says in the book, commit, don't whine, and see what happens. If you choose to modify it, then do that. Whatever. It's your journey. --Jimmy
            Ouch! Got it. Wink I clearly haven't read enough. I did not want to sub Hal for MAFF. I just wanted to know about inserting MAFF-recommended speedwork down the line. I'm putting the cart before the horse it seems. What I really want is approx 8:30ish/min/miles, for a long time, that don't kill me.
            Stacy
            I make no apologies for my liberal use of smiley icons. http://stacyruns.wordpress.com/
              Hope that wasn't painful. Was intended to be a gentle massage of your brain! What was your last few race times? --Jimmy
              Shiksa


              Aerobigal! (thx Jimmy!)

                Big grin I just ordered two Mafftone books from Amazon to pound...er massage my brain. The recommended book was unavailable, but I hope the two I ordered will have the same information. What you wrote definitely wasn't too painful. I'm thick-skinned. Not intending to whine, but seriously, having a baby has killed any ability of mine to read and retain information. It improves over time, but sleeplessness messes with the brain big-time. Please be patient with me. I'm smarter than I type. Smile All of my races have been personal except for one. Baby shuffling didn't work so well last year. My last runs that I considered "races" and logged as such were: 9/22 5K - 26:44 10/14 10K - 58:22 11/11 1/2 marathon - 2:08:37 12/8 5K - 26:20
                Stacy
                I make no apologies for my liberal use of smiley icons. http://stacyruns.wordpress.com/
                  Like jimmyb said, you should keep reading up so you get a better understanding of why some of the programs call for what they do, but in general, very simply: Almost all programs start with a basic assumption that you should: a) run regularly (3-4 days a week at least) b) increase your weekly/daily mileage 5-10% until you reach a level you are comfortable with. The mileage for (b) depends completely on your goals. That is the very minimum framework for 80% of the plans out there. Within that framework, the real differences between the plans come in as far as the paces and types of workouts to run. So while MAF and HAL programs are similar as far as the basics, they differ beyond that. Each program benefits you in particular ways, and you need to understand what your goals are, what your strengths/weaknesses are, and how the plans match those things up. MAF theory basically says, the most important thing is to keep your effort level low, and that doing so consistently will help you run faster with less effort, up to a point where it levels off and you'll need to add additional training types. By definition tempo and speedwork are not done at a low effort level, so adding those run types isn't really compatible with MAF training until you've gone through at least 12 weeks of the program, and then only if you note that your benefits have plateaued. Hope this gives you a little more perspective of how the two training types fit together. Keep reading/learning, and you'll be able to put together your own program in no time. Getting it to be most effective for your personal goals/abilities can take a little longer. Smile Good luck!
                  db7


                    Lots of answers. http://spaces.msn.com/members/formationflier/ DB

                    Tougher than most, dumber than the rest. "You can not count the miles until you feel them" TVZ

                      Big grin I just ordered two Mafftone books from Amazon to pound...er massage my brain. The recommended book was unavailable, but I hope the two I ordered will have the same information. What you wrote definitely wasn't too painful. I'm thick-skinned. Not intending to whine, but seriously, having a baby has killed any ability of mine to read and retain information. It improves over time, but sleeplessness messes with the brain big-time. Please be patient with me. I'm smarter than I type. Smile All of my races have been personal except for one. Baby shuffling didn't work so well last year. My last runs that I considered "races" and logged as such were: 9/22 5K - 26:44 10/14 10K - 58:22 11/11 1/2 marathon - 2:08:37 12/8 5K - 26:20
                      I popped your 26:20 into the McMillan calculator. and it suggests that you're lacking in aerobic endurance as your 10k and half marathon times aren't matching up. That's usually the case. Your current 5k pace is 8:29. You can hold that for 3+ miles. I don't see why you couldn't get your 10k down to 8:30 pace, and your half marathon time to sub 2 hours with good period of aerobic base work. Once you build your aerobic speed (slow twitch, fat-burning speed), all your times will begin too drop precipitously. All of Maffetones heart rate books have basically the same info. Keep going! --Jimmy
                      Shiksa


                      Aerobigal! (thx Jimmy!)

                        Thanks for looking those numbers over Jimmy. I'll keep working and looking forward to the improvement.
                        Stacy
                        I make no apologies for my liberal use of smiley icons. http://stacyruns.wordpress.com/