Low HR Training

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So how much slower is your MAF pace in the hot summer? (Read 406 times)

SurfNSB


    Just curious to see how much summer time heats slows everyone down during their MAF tests.

     

    I live in Florida, so our summers get into the mid 90's with high humidity levels. 

     

    My last and best MAF test was in March before it got hot here. I averaged an 8:57 pace per mile over the 5 mile test with a 1 mile warmup before. Temp was in the upper 60s with 45% humidity.

     

    Now my MAF pace during the summer hovers between 10:00 - 10:45 per mile, depending on just how hot it is and how humid. I'd say the temp is usually hovering around 90 when I run in the late afternoon/evening hours.

     

    Kind of sucks to see my pace slow that much, but hopefully it'll come back fast once cooler temps are back.

      Heat will slow you, but acclimation will reduce the slowing a bit.

      This chart from Jeff Galloway tends to be on the money for us non-elites:

       

      55-60 degrees - 1% 

      60-65 degrees - 3% 

      65-70 degrees - 5% 

      70-75 degrees - 7% 

      75-80 degrees - 12% 

      80-85 degrees - 20% 

      Above 85 degrees - Forget it... run for fun

       

      One of the beauties of HRM training is you don't have to worry about how to adjust. The HRM will take care of that for you.

       

      In the summer, just look for improvement on your summer paces. If you slowed to 10:00, and can get the MAF pace down to 9:30, you've done something. If you keep regressing, then sometimes a cut in volume will reverse it. Heat adds to the training load.

       

      Good luck, Surf.

      --Jimmy

      log   prs      Crusted Salt comic #142

       

        p.s. I moved to Georgia 3 years ago from Rhode Island, and it kicked my butt. I finally started to see results last year after a few years of really slow paces in the seemingly constant heat. I was finishing very well in the few races I managed to get into last year during a brief window from real life. It doesn't take a lot of volume to improve in the heat. I saw some pretty good improvement on half the volume I used to train in cooler weather up north.

        log   prs      Crusted Salt comic #142

         

        SurfNSB


          Thanks for that table...its very helpful.

           

          My running volume has definitely been reduced 25-40% during this heat just because its much harder to get motivated to go out when its so dang sticky out Smile

            My MAF slow down over the summer months is similar to yours. Its a bit discouraging if you're a data junkie but the fall should yield some good run paces if you can just hang in there.

             

            The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

             

            2014 Goals:

             

            Stay healthy

            Enjoy life

             

              Heat will slow you, but acclimation will reduce the slowing a bit.

              This chart from Jeff Galloway tends to be on the money for us non-elites:

               

              55-60 degrees - 1% 

              60-65 degrees - 3% 

              65-70 degrees - 5% 

              70-75 degrees - 7% 

              75-80 degrees - 12% 

              80-85 degrees - 20% 

              Above 85 degrees - Forget it... run for fun

               

               

               

              I think this is a bit more complex than that. I definitely don't slow by 20% at 80-85 degrees. Actually, if I run at really low HR's, then my pace doesn't really get affected compared to colder weather. I find if I run at lower than 160bpm or so, then 80-90 degrees heat doesn't affect the pace or my body much.  I usually don't try running if it's over 90 Smile I go out in the evenings and it's rarely past 90 then. Note it's usually dry weather... that sure helps.

               

              180-age pace (150-155 HR) for me is around 9:30 now and that's not affected by much in summer, seems virtually the same at 55F and at 80F. Above 80-85F it does slow a bit but I didn't try to check exactly how much, it's not a lot of slowing even at 90F. 

               

              Faster pace/higher HR is different... I tried 8:30 pace in 95F recently (it wasn't evening, I ran with a friend late afternoon, bad idea Smile ) and that killed me, overheating, HR going up crazy and all that crap. In 80F I can currently run that pace at 165-170 HR, not sure about cold weather but last time I checked in spring it was not very different but maybe I improved since then? :P. On that hot day in 95F at this 8:30 pace, HR went past 180 after just a few miles, the HR itself wasn't as bad as the overheating though Smile This would be then around 12% slowing going from 80F to 95F in theory (going by what pace would belong to that HR at 80F). In practice it's infinite slowing because I could not keep up the run after a few miles.

               

              It seems like for me there is this temperature threshold which, if passed, makes me overheated and it's practically infinite slowing of pace :P Below threshold everything fine, I don't really slow much or feel the heat or need a drink or anything at all. And it seems this threshold is also pace/HR dependent for me... if slow enough run, then there is no such threshold, if slightly faster run, I pass it at around 90F or so.

               

              Okay, I maybe dramatized that a bit too much with that expression of "infinite slowing". Smile I've had runs in 85-90F where I overheated somewhat in the first few miles but then it stayed at that level, not deteriorating, so I could run pretty long even without water (2 hours) and slowing wasn't too bad though HR would slowly creep up.

                That's amazing that your pace at the same HR remains virtually the same at 55° as it does at 85°. That means your body feels virtually no extra stress from a 30° difference. I wonder why. Amount of body fat and ability to dissipate heat from the body, as well as acclimation come into play in reducing the stress--but virtually no stress is amazing.

                 

                As usual, you're the anomaly, C. Shall I say "gifted" in the area of body heat dissipation? Cool

                log   prs      Crusted Salt comic #142

                 

                SurfNSB


                  He did mention its usually dry weather....that helps I think.

                   

                  I do MUCH better in low humidity than high. I ran on a 92 degree day where the humidity was around 30%, which is really unusual for Florida at this time. My MAF pace was around 9:45 for this run. Previous runs done in the upper 80s with humidity 80% or higher, my MAF pace was much slower: 10:15-10:45.