Low HR Training

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The Legs? (Read 433 times)

    Training for my first marathon in October. I am following Higdon's Intermediate 1 and did 14 miles yesterday at a pace nearing 10:30. From a cardio standpoint, I felt like I could've easily kept going, but my legs were tiring and a little sore today. This is the furthest I have ever run (a half-marathon being the previous best), but my legs haven't been this tired from a run in a while. Is this normal? I have always felt pretty good with my LHR's prior, even on the previous 12 & 11 milers. This is obviously subjective, but come marathon time, will my legs be ready? Right now, that is my fear. I ran a half-marathon 40+ minutes faster than my training run yesterday and I don't remember my legs being this tired. Could all the extra steps from going slow play in? Thanks.
      Training for my first marathon in October. I am following Higdon's Intermediate 1 and did 14 miles yesterday at a pace nearing 10:30. From a cardio standpoint, I felt like I could've easily kept going, but my legs were tiring and a little sore today. This is the furthest I have ever run (a half-marathon being the previous best), but my legs haven't been this tired from a run in a while. Is this normal? I have always felt pretty good with my LHR's prior, even on the previous 12 & 11 milers. This is obviously subjective, but come marathon time, will my legs be ready? Right now, that is my fear. I ran a half-marathon 40+ minutes faster than my training run yesterday and I don't remember my legs being this tired. Could all the extra steps from going slow play in? Thanks.
      Interesting, because I had a conversation with another runner about this recently. Many runners experience the tiredness you describe above 13 miles, no matter how slow or fast you run those miles. There is a different type of tiredness above 20 miles as well. I call the 13+ mile sensation "the long run feeling", it's something you will get used to, and may lessen to some extent, as you do more 14+ mile long runs. Certainly the extra time on your feet, the fact that this was your longest run ever, and likely the cumulative miles of your recent training schedule are all contributors to your tired legs. If your legs are tired, but you are healthy, you are doing better than a lot of first time marathon trainers. Just stick with the schedule, make sure you include your recovery days/weeks, and your legs will be ready as they can be on race day. The extra time on your feet doing some long training runs at LHRs will be a blessing on race day.


      Just Be

        I had that feeling when I first started consistently doing a long run per week on the last day of June of this year but after only 1 month it's gone. However, my longest run was last week, a 17 miler, and my running partner and I really pushed the pace for the last half of the run, turning the last 3ish miles into a sub 6:00/mile tempo pace, and still, that day and the day after I felt like I do after any easy run. I guess I adapted fast. The key is consistency, I suppose.
          WOW! A sub 6? Is that at MAF? Smile I am a neophyte and some things you read and apply and then some things you have to just learn by doing. I did 15 miles this week. Yes, my legs are tired, but just wanted to note a couple things, esp. for you newbies: 1. Last week I ran in the afternoon and this week was at 6:30 AM. My heart rate is much lower in the morning, producing much better (time wise) runs and the weather was much preferred for this week's run than last week. 2. Humidity, heat, etc., are major factors in the run. This is standard fare, but for you new guys like me, please keep this in mind and don't get discouraged on your runs 3. Yesterday was a MAF test and, believe it or not, I forgot to mark my times before resetting my watch for today's run, but from what I can remember: Mile 1 9:15 Mile 2 9:25 Mile 3 9:35 Give or take a couple seconds +/- for each time. Well, a month ago I did a MAF first thing in the morning on a nice running day and my times were approx. 15-25 seconds/mile faster. And, two months ago I did a MAF w/ weather conditions quite similar to yesterday's, including running around the same time of the day, and my times were 9:36, 10:05 and 10:25 (again, give or take, b/c I don't feel like looking them up). As you can see, I am improved over two months ago, although it appears that my times dropped from last month. I will do another on Tuesday morning and see where the times are. Just an update for those interested in those sorts of variables. I am amazed at how durable, yet temperamental, the body can be.
          lowgear1


          Max McMaffelow Esq.

            thekman, I'll second that! It's amazing how the weather and a number of other factors can camouflage training gains. After nearly two years since taking up running, i'm still often fooled by the ups and downs. One thing that is absolutely certain though, is that if you keep plugging away at mostly maf level runs, you will keep improving. I've yet to hear of anyone not benefit, who gave it an honest go. Patience and thinking long term will reward your efforts. lg
            ♪ ♫ Hey, hey, we're Maf Monkees And people say we monkey around. ♪ ♫ (The Monkees)
            Give me 12:59 in '09, please. I deserve it! (Maf of course)..No more teens! No more teens! (ME! ME! ME!)
            ♪ ♫ I Thank The Lord For The Night Time...And I Thank The Lord For You ♪ ♫ (Neil Diamond)


            Just Be

              WOW! A sub 6? Is that at MAF? Smile
              For any distance less than 1 mile or maybe a bit over 1 mile I seem to be able to manage sub 6 pace below 80% max heart rate. My 10 mile 80% max heart rate pace on the outdoor track seems to be right around a 6:45/mile pace. I'm not sure about the distances in between since I haven't really paid much attention to it, but I'd guess it's somewhere around 6:30/mile for a 10k at 80% max and maybe 6:15 to 6:25/mile for a 5k at 80%. At the end of that 17 miler, we were going down a steady shallow hill for the last 2 miles and doing close to 5:45/mile pace, sometimes faster, and my HR definitely wasn't in the MAF range anymore. In fact, my HRM recorded a max HR of 193 that day, IIRC without checking my running log. I was surprised how easy that pace felt given how high my HR climbed. I was still conversational the whole time with hardly any discomfort. I guess it has something to do with my heart and other muscles being so warmed up from the 14 miles prior. But I felt at the same time that if I pushed the pace just a tiny bit harder, I would have totally crashed - usually that teetering point is much more gradual for shorter races and I have more room to push the pace lower and lower as I settle in and get more comfortable.