Low HR Training

1

Need for a weekly minimal distance/duration of LHR training to see results? (Read 437 times)

    Just wondering...

    After a period of relative inactivety I started running again late July.

    In the first half of this year I was already trying to incorporate some barefooting in my runs, but this summer I decided to run only unshod.

    I took it easy, starting with short distances and then switching to a run/walk program, and always taking care not to run faster than MAF.

     

     

    No walking intervals in the last week, I'm running now 3 times about 30 minutes, plus 5 min of brisk walking before and after as warm up/cool down. (And I must say, that I find it much easier to run with a regular pace/HR barefoot than shod... And my barefoot pace seems a little bit faster than my shod pace. )

     

     

    But in this forum I always see weekly mileages that are far above what I actually run. 

    So I started wondering...  Will there always be 'some' benefit from LHR training, or is there some minimal distance / minimal amount of time one should run in a week to see a progression, however slow it may be?

    Running in Belgium
    Ann

     

     

     

      Hi Ann, nice to see you posting here again.

       

      "Benefit" is a relative term---all depends on what your goals are. If you are coming off a period of inactivity and just want to stay healthy, then a half hour a day will be probably be enough for that. Studies show that just 20 minutes of aerobic exercise a day can increase the probability of good health. If you plan to be an endurance runner or walker, then more time on your feet might be necessary in order to build the endurance you need for (e.g.) a 10k or a 50k. 15 miles per week, with no increase in volume probably won't prepare you for a marathon---thus no benefit relative to that goal.

       

      Know what your goals are, and prepare properly if they are more than just a state of general health.

       

      If you have a goal to develop your aerobic system to it's highest levels, you will continually need to challenge it. Give it something a little more to endure each week. E.G. 3 hours a week at MAF might give you gains in aerobic speed for awhile, but most likely there will come a point where you will plateau because that 3 hours isn't enough to take it to higher levels. Keeping track of your speed at MAF will guide you through all phases of your training.

       

      --JImmyCool

       

       

       

       

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      Race Less Train More

        Hi Ann, nice to see you posting here again.

         

        "Benefit" is a relative term---all depends on what your goals are. If you are coming off a period of inactivity and just want to stay healthy, then a half hour a day will be probably be enough for that. Studies show that just 20 minutes of aerobic exercise a day can increase the probability of good health. If you plan to be an endurance runner or walker, then more time on your feet might be necessary in order to build the endurance you need for (e.g.) a 10k or a 50k. 15 miles per week, with no increase in volume probably won't prepare you for a marathon---thus no benefit relative to that goal.

         

        Know what your goals are, and prepare properly if they are more than just a state of general health.

         

        If you have a goal to develop your aerobic system to it's highest levels, you will continually need to challenge it. Give it something a little more to endure each week. E.G. 3 hours a week at MAF might give you gains in aerobic speed for awhile, but most likely there will come a point where you will plateau because that 3 hours isn't enough to take it to higher levels. Keeping track of your speed at MAF will guide you through all phases of your training.

         

        --JImmyCool

         +1

        Run until the trail runs out.

        2013***1500 miles

        50 miler

         

         

        unsolicited chatter

        http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

          Thank you for the replies...

          Goals? Well, at least two dreams...

          - running a half marathon

          - running a trail race (Belgian trails are often rather short... the calendar of the Belgian trail running federation shows more trail < 10k than over 50k)

           

          But in spring 2011 I let me talk into signing  up for a half in October (instead of the half in october this year like I planned), and the predictable result was that I did too much too soon and ended up overtrained in late summer.

          And I still have the impression that now I'm always a bit scared to run too much... to proceed too fast, to run too far.

           

          That was the reason I started running by HR, and so far, it feels good.  But of course... with my slow pace I'm only running short distances, and that makes me wonder if I'll ever be able to run a reasonable distance. 

          Running in Belgium
          Ann

           

           

           

            Thank you for the replies...

            Goals? Well, at least two dreams...

            - running a half marathon

            - running a trail race (Belgian trails are often rather short... the calendar of the Belgian trail running federation shows more trail < 10k than over 50k)

             

            But in spring 2011 I let me talk into signing  up for a half in October (instead of the half in october this year like I planned), and the predictable result was that I did too much too soon and ended up overtrained in late summer.

            And I still have the impression that now I'm always a bit scared to run too much... to proceed too fast, to run too far.

             

            That was the reason I started running by HR, and so far, it feels good.  But of course... with my slow pace I'm only running short distances, and that makes me wonder if I'll ever be able to run a reasonable distance. 

             

            You can run a half marathon, Ann. If you can eventually build your volume (slowly) up to 13 miles (22k)  on your long run, then you will be mentally ready as well as physically. Go slowly. Make a training schedule that increases volume by 5% per week, and only deviate if you are tired and need rest---never add more. It's up to you whether to increase volume or time. Brisk walking also helps you build your aerobic system, so don't think that walking is not preferable or less than running. It all helps. If at the current time, you have to walk to stay at MAF, do so, until it's too uncomfortable to walk at MAF. Consider:

             

            ---doing regular MAF tests

             

            ---keeping track of your resting heart rate. This is as important as MAF tests. You can either take it right when you wake up in the morning, or lie down and relax for 5-10 minutes before you go run. If it ever deviates from the norm more than 5 beats above or below, then take the day off, or just workout very slowly and easily for a brief time.

             

            ---build a 6 month weekly schedule starting at your current volume, increasing 5% per week---with a cutback week every 3-4 weeks. Keep your long run no more than 25-30% of total volume in a week. Once your long runs are up to more than 2 hours, do them every other week. On the week in between do a medium long run (1-2 hours).

             

            Here's a sample 6 month schedule for beginners to show you one way of structuring a week that distributes your time starting with 2 hours per week that builds slowly by 5%. This is just a sample or something to consider. Use at own risk. There might be better ones for you to try, or people with much more knowledge than me that could help you. This is just to show how to think about a schedule and how to take it slowly. The important thing is increase a little every week,  go hard day/easy day.

             

            Notice the slow build and distribution between runs, and the cutback weeks.

            With any schedule that you create, always let your MAF tests and body dictate extra rest and cutting back to reduce stress. Any schedule should be a guide. This is a time-based schedule in minutes. The amount of time each day includes your warm-up. Just do a very slow walk (15 minutes or so) for cool-down.

            Nothing wrong with repeating a week 2 or three times before advancing to the next week, but don't jump ahead.


            You can either run or walk briskly ( a HR that is within MAF to MAF-15). Walking briskly counts as workout time.

             

            If you are too tired one day to run, don't try to make up the day. Just move to the next day in the schedule. Give your body the respect of listening to it.

             



             
            DAYS:
            1........2........3.....4.......5 .... ..6 ......7......total

             (in minutes)

            18.....26.....00.....22.....18.....36.....00.....120

            19.....27.....00.....23.....19.....38.....00.....126

            20.....28.....00.....24.....20.....40.....00.....132

            20.....28.....00.....24.....00.....33.....00.....105

            21.....30.....00.....25.....21.....42.....00.....139

            22.....32.....00.....26.....22.....44.....00.....146

            23.....33.....00.....28.....23.....46.....00.....153

            23.....33.....00.....28.....00.....37.....00.....121

            24.....35.....00.....29.....24.....48.....00.....160

            25.....37.....00.....30.....25.....51.....00.....168

            27.....39.....00.....31.....27.....53.....00.....177

            27.....39.....00.....31.....00.....46.....00.....143

            28.....41.....00.....33.....28.....56.....00.....186

            29.....43.....00.....35.....29.....59.....00.....195

            31.....45.....00.....36.....31.....62.....00.....205

            31.....45.....00.....36.....00.....50.....00.....162

            32.....47.....00.....39.....32.....65.....00.....215

            34.....49.....00.....41.....34.....68.....00.....226

            36.....52.....00.....43.....36.....71.....00.....238

            36.....52.....00.....43.....00.....60.....00.....191

            37.....55.....00.....45.....37.....75.....00.....249

            39.....58.....00.....47.....39.....79.....00.....262

            41.....60.....00.....50.....41.....83.....00.....275

            41.....60.....00.....50.....00.....70.....00.....191

            43.....64.....00.....52.....43.....87.....00.....289

            45.....66.....00.....55.....45.....91.....00.....302

            45.....69.....06.....56.....45.....96.....00.....318

            45.....60.....00.....50.....00.....75.....00.....240

            45.....74.....10.....60.....45.....100...00.....334

            45.....77.....16.....63.....45.....105...00.....351

            45.....81.....20.....66.....45.....111...00.....368

            45.....60.....00.....60.....00.....85.....00.....260

            45.....85.....26.....70.....45.....116...00.....387

            45.....90.....32.....73.....45.....120...00.....405

             

             

            Good luck, Ann. If you take it slowly, one day at a time, and be smart (listen to your body and monitor MAF speed and RestingHR), you will give yourself the best chance to reach your goals. Remember not to obsess about your speed and fitness, don't compare yourself to others, and to keep us in the loop!!!! Keep us posted! This particular message board is all about support and community. Cool

             

            --Jimmy

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            Race Less Train More

              Are you planning to run the HM barefoot?

              Run until the trail runs out.

              2013***1500 miles

              50 miler

               

               

              unsolicited chatter

              http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

                Thank you very much Jimmy...

                While you were typing this long answer (thanks again) I was doing my first MAF-test since March (haven't been running for a few months afterwards) and was surprised to notice how well it went: (pace in first km was slower than in March, but average pace was faster, so less slowing down) I already noticed that running barefoot it's much easier to keep my HR in the same range.

                Running in Belgium
                Ann

                 

                 

                 

                  @runnerclay: I'm not even PLANNING to run it... just dreaming about it...

                   

                  I'm running barefoot now, but since it's getting colder... I don't know how long I will can run barefoot: fall and winter (and spring and summer) can be rather wet here, and wet pavement is so much colder than dry...

                  Running in Belgium
                  Ann

                   

                   

                   

                    @Jimmyb

                    I have been reading and rereading your post over the past two days.

                    In the schedule you provide, you start with about 120 minutes a week, and thats about the time that I'm doing now (3 x 30 min of running, with 5 min of walking at the beginning and at the end).
                    But your schedule distributes them over 5 shorter trainings.

                     

                    And indeed, apart from my question is the amount of training that I do now would be enough to improve my condition, I was wondering what would be better: running 3 times, with always at least one day of rest, or running shorter, but more often.

                    I often heard the warning that beginning runners should always take a day of rest after a training run. I guess that  certainly applies when one is running faster that MAF, but probably not when you're running at a gentle pace and 'gentle' distance...

                    I also notice that in your schedule the runs all have different lengths, and that way a 'longer' run is always followed by a shorter run or a day of rest.

                     

                    I decided to make a scheme for the next two weeks, with 5 runs a week, and see how I feel with two extra training days.

                     

                    I have learned already that switching between running and walking isn't 'bad', but in the last few weeks, I had to speed up to keep my HR on MAF, not to slow down. 

                    Running in Belgium
                    Ann

                     

                     

                     

                      @Jimmyb

                      I have been reading and rereading your post over the past two days.

                      In the schedule you provide, you start with about 120 minutes a week, and thats about the time that I'm doing now (3 x 30 min of running, with 5 min of walking at the beginning and at the end).
                      But your schedule distributes them over 5 shorter trainings.

                       

                      And indeed, apart from my question is the amount of training that I do now would be enough to improve my condition, I was wondering what would be better: running 3 times, with always at least one day of rest, or running shorter, but more often.

                      I often heard the warning that beginning runners should always take a day of rest after a training run. I guess that  certainly applies when one is running faster that MAF, but probably not when you're running at a gentle pace and 'gentle' distance...

                      I also notice that in your schedule the runs all have different lengths, and that way a 'longer' run is always followed by a shorter run or a day of rest.

                       

                      I decided to make a scheme for the next two weeks, with 5 runs a week, and see how I feel with two extra training days.

                       

                      I have learned already that switching between running and walking isn't 'bad', but in the last few weeks, I had to speed up to keep my HR on MAF, not to slow down. 

                       

                       

                      Remember, just let your body be your guide. If you're doing 5 days a week on a schedule, and on one particular training day you feel tired and your legs feel dead, or your resting heart rate is high---take the day off. Don't bother making up the scheduled workout. If the next day on the schedule is an off day, then take the off day--two days in a row will only help. A good rule of thumb:

                       

                      --if you skip a scheduled workout due to high resting heart rate or feelings of exhaustion, don't try to make it up. (e.g.) If it was a long run, then wait until the next scheduled one comes along. If it means that it will be 4 weeks between long runs, or an extra week before you get the tempo run in, so be it. Your body needs the rest.

                       

                      Good luck, Ann!

                      --Jimmy

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