Low HR Training

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Hydration a la Maffetone... (Read 791 times)

    The prevailing theory out there is the following: http://www.clutchfitness.com/forums/view.php?pg=myth-fat-burning-zone I'm just not sure the relevance to MAF base training, which is about developing the ABILITY to use fat to process oxygen (faster and faster with aerobic fibers). There is a mentionin the article that at low intensities, cabs will inhibit fat-burning, and no effect at higher intesities. Perhaps that is where warming up comes into play. I put in an email to Dr. Maffetone for his view. Hopefully he'll get back to me. I couldn't find a specific refernece in his books for this topic. --Jimmy
    Good article. I get the impression that the author recommends eating prior to and during training. Is that your interpretation? I did 42 miles this week (10 more than previous high), a harder mountain bike ride and an easy spinning session and feel totally recovered. I never would have been able to do that before. It's hard for me to ignore the possible benefits of eating before morning runs. EDITED TO ADD: Jimmy, I mis-read your post prior to reading the article. After re-reading it, I now see that you interpreted the article the way I did. From article: "Fasted = Suboptimal Fasted cardio is not optimal for reasons spanning beyond its questionable track record in research. There’s unavoidable positive metabolic synergy in fed (read: properly fueled) training, regardless of sport. This effect increases with intensity of training; even in untrained subjects, whatever fat oxidation is suppressed during training is compensated for in the recovery period by multiple mechanisms, many of which are not yet identified. Athletes are known for their gravitation towards self-sacrifice, but some rely on hearsay, while others rely on science. Did you know that way back in the 60’s, it wasn’t uncommon for coaches to tell athletes in various sports to avoid drinking water before and during training? No comment needed. Good thing researchers questioned it, and enough data surfaced to validate claims of the skeptics. Sometimes counterproductive dogma indeed dies, thank goodness. However, the myths addressed here are admittedly more subtle than the water example. Even on suboptimal protocols, athletes all over the world still inch along, although not at optimal rates, and not necessarily to optimal levels."
      http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/marathonlongrun.htm The above article was one of my influences on my decision to not train with carbs, nor to eat them before. As I've said before, during a run I never bonk, I never feel hungry, even on days with no breakfast and runs up to 22 miles. As McMillan suggests, if someone decided to go in this direction, he or she might want to wean --not just go from eating to no eating. This advice contradicts the research in the other article. The one thing missing in the former article is the mention of muscle glycogen as fuel. Anyway, I'll report back if I get an answer from Dr. Maffetone. --Jimmy

      Log & Profile            Crusted Salt #210

        http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/marathonlongrun.htm The above article was one of my influences on my decision to not train with carbs, nor to eat them before. As I've said before, during a run I never bonk, I never feel hungry, even on days with no breakfast and runs up to 22 miles. As McMillan suggests, if someone decided to go in this direction, he or she might want to wean --not just go from eating to no eating. This advice contradicts the research in the other article. The one thing missing in the former article is the mention of muscle glycogen as fuel. Anyway, I'll report back if I get an answer from Dr. Maffetone. --Jimmy
        I like that article. It has been my "long run methodology" since my first marathon, and I have had very results with it.
          http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/marathonlongrun.htm The above article was one of my influences on my decision to not train with carbs, nor to eat them before. As I've said before, during a run I never bonk, I never feel hungry, even on days with no breakfast and runs up to 22 miles. As McMillan suggests, if someone decided to go in this direction, he or she might want to wean --not just go from eating to no eating. This advice contradicts the research in the other article. The one thing missing in the former article is the mention of muscle glycogen as fuel. Anyway, I'll report back if I get an answer from Dr. Maffetone. --Jimmy
          Thanks for the article. It's good to hear both sides of the story. I'm very interested in hearing what Dr. Maffetone has to say about this, since reducing stress and staying healthy seems to be his primary focus.


          Future running partner.

            At the risk of sounding 2 faced. I can see benefits to both sides. My take is this: If you are building up the duration of your long runs to lengths of time behond anything you have done before, fuel up as best you can and reduce the stress as much as you can. Other physiological factors are already going to be stressed enough. Once you have reached your goal duration and can do it fairly comftorbly with fuel, then slowly decrease your fueling on each iteration of your long run, to reap more of the fat burning benefits of the long run.
              I wonder if Maffetone's rules would allow this... http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2008/07/28/anaya.beer.marathon.kmsb
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