Marathon Training and Discussions

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How Long After Marathon Until... (Read 1027 times)


3Days4Cure

    ...until I can really kick into a real training schedule. Drumline wrecks my winter, and I'm taking the lessons from that to build into a consistent plan/lifestyle so next season (November through April) I don't lose as much ground and can be clear about my time constraints and needs. Getting 2 hours of sleep on weekends is no longer acceptable, especially if I want to do a 3 hour plus run--I think I've learned something. Blush Background I want to run a bit the day after, even if its .25 a mile. I plan to start swimming on Tuesday and do 3 days a week into perpetuity as a cross training, building into 1 mile 3 times a week. I also want to get my cycle back out and get back on the strength training horse since my broken finger is as healed as it gets. The plan is to workout 2x a day, with one rest day a week. I also plan to get to and maintain 40mpw for a while and use that as base for my fall Marathon. It is important to note that after the fall, I'm taking a year off from racing and focusing on base, going from 40mpw to 60ish (maxing out at a 3hr long run during drumline season and going longer only when I can get enough sleep). The plan is to start doing consistent 6 days a week running from a 4-5 dpw pattern by next April. Hopefully that sets me up to be a legitimate runner/marathoner. Questions 1. I can swim almost immediately after the marathon, yes?? Little to no impact means I can't aggravate any injuries lurking from the effort? 2. How soon until I can add some cycling? I may do only 15-20 mpw, but I want to do some work commutes soon now the weather is nice. 3. How soon can I add some strength training, focusing on core and arms, nothing for the legs. 4. How fast do you think I can build back/up to 40mpw? MTA: Spelling. I suck at it. Especially when sneaking around posting at work.

    Chris

    2014 Goals 
    Raise $3,000 for the Komen 3-Day (and walk 60 miles in 3 days)
    Run at least one race

     

    xor


      The following answers assume you are merely sore (or better). 1. now 2. now 3. now 4. As soon as it doesn't hurt.

       


      Prince of Fatness

        I can't argue with what SR said.
        I want to run a bit the day after, even if its .25 a mile.
        I don't see what you gain from that. When I ran my first marathon my quads were sore for 4 - 5 days. I was walking down stairs backwards. I went for a run with only one day off and I wish I hadn't. It was less than a half hour but it really sucked. My form was terrible. I'm glad none of the neighbors saw me because it must have looked pretty damn funny. If I had to do it over, and I will September, I'd do some walking for at least 3 - 4 days before I even try running. If you just stick to walking and / or you cross training you'd be better off in my opinion, especially if you're sore, which I think you will be.

        Semi-retired.

          I don't see what you gain from that. When I ran my first marathon my quads were sore for 4 - 5 days. I was walking down stairs backwards. I went for a run with only one day off and I wish I hadn't. It was less than a half hour but it really sucked. My form was terrible. I'm glad none of the neighbors saw me because it must have looked pretty damn funny. If I had to do it over, and I will September, I'd do some walking for at least 3 - 4 days before I even try running. If you just stick to walking and / or you cross training you'd be better off in my opinion, especially if you're sore, which I think you will be.
          Maybe it's mental, but I think it helped me feel less stiff. I ran very easily the week after my last marathon and I thought it was fine.

          ~Sara
          It's supposed to be hard. If it wasn't hard, everyone would do it. The hard is what makes it great. ~ Jimmy Dugan


          Hawt and sexy

            Run. Get the blood flowing. It helps speed recovery. Go look through the Pfitz links on recovery in the links thread. Somewhere he provides the science behind it.

            I'm touching your pants.


            A Saucy Wench

              Run. Get the blood flowing. It helps speed recovery. Go look through the Pfitz links on recovery in the links thread. Somewhere he provides the science behind it.
              I felt much better last time after walking the day OF the marathon and jogging slowly the next morning I think it was.. Nope I take that back, I went to the gym and rode the stationary bike for 20 minutes the next day and ran/walked the day after that. By day 4 I was running at normal pace and was pretty much back to base volume by the next week or two.

              I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

               

              "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


              Prince of Fatness

                Just to be clear I was really talking about running the first day or two. I did it with only a day off and I regret it. I was too sore. So thinking about this a little more I really think it depends on how sore you are. If you are sore to the point where you're walking down stairs backward then I still say it doesn't make sense to run. Wait until most of the soreness goes away. And I agree. Definitely do something to get the blood flowing even if you are real sore. Walking, stationary bike, whatever. It just doesn't have to be running. Also the marathon I ran was Steamtown, and my quads were pretty much trashed for a couple of days from running down those hills.

                Semi-retired.


                HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                  I bet srlopez takes the time between marathons off when he's doing a double or triple -- am I right?

                  It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


                  Hawt and sexy

                    Dude, Steamtown? I run it every year. I live right on the course. Those hills are my training ground. I just run really slow the day after. Although last year, not so good for me (under-trained). I know that if I don't run within the first two days, the soreness does not even think about going away. But if I do something small, I start feeling better by day two. I think srlopez did the 52 in one year thing. I kinda remember reading about it at another running site. He ran every weekend for a long time. I am guessing he has tried both approaches.

                    I'm touching your pants.

                      Okay, I'm old and slow, but . . . I usually go for a walk the next day as it helps me loosen up. After Yakima I did a couple miles easy the next day plus a walk because after sitting in the car for three hours coming home I really needed to loosen up. I was sore the first day after the race, less so the second day, almost not at all the third day and felt pretty normal the day after that. Other than the first marathon I did in 2006, I've mostly been ready to go after three days with no sore muscles. The first one I didn't have sore muscles after three days, but did have a killer blister on the bottom of my left heel and couldn't put any weight on it at all. Granted, I wouldn't want to go do another one immediately, but the more of them I do, the shorter the time until I feel like I could.
                      Rose Marathon Maniac #991 Half Fanatic #58 It's a perfect day and I feel great!


                      Queen of 3rd Place

                        What Ennay said. Walking the same day is the ticket. I've done the same thing after long runs and it ALWAYS helps.

                        2013 Valley Runner of the Year Series: Feb 16 5K (4 points out of 10) ... Mar 2 10K (20/30)... Mar 16 4Mi (21/30) ... Apr 6 10K (DNS) ... Apr 21 2Mi (5/10) ... May 11 5Mi (21/30)... Jun 8 1Mi (13/20) ... Jun 16 6Mi (22/30) ... Sep 28 10K (14/20) ... Oct 5 5K (7/10) ...Oct 12 5Mi (16/20) ... Oct 20 5K (0/10) = 3rd Place, Women's Senior Division


                        Prince of Fatness

                          Dude, Steamtown? I run it every year. I live right on the course. Those hills are my training ground. I just run really slow the day after. Although last year, not so good for me (under-trained). I know that if I don't run within the first two days, the soreness does not even think about going away. But if I do something small, I start feeling better by day two.
                          Yeah, I ran Steamtown 2007. First marathon and I get temps in the 70's and muggy. Oh well. That's a well run race up there and I'd like to run it again sometime. Can't do it this year. Instead I'll be running Lehigh Valley in September. The canal towpath that is part of the course is my training ground. I live about 5 minutes from the finish line. Getting back to recovery, I think you hit on something here. The level of training leading up to the race plays a role in how quickly you recover. If you've been running consistent mileage over a significant period of time I would think you'd recover more quickly than a person that ramped up their mileage for a month or two just in order to finish a marathon.

                          Semi-retired.

                          xor


                            I think srlopez did the 52 in one year thing. I kinda remember reading about it at another running site. He ran every weekend for a long time. I am guessing he has tried both approaches.
                            No. I ran 65 in one year. (2007) Only 41 last year. (2008)

                             

                            xor


                              I bet srlopez takes the time between marathons off when he's doing a double or triple -- am I right?
                              AP, I'm not sure what this means, but I'd like to answer it honestly/seriously. A double is 2 in 2 days, a triple 3 in 3 (and 4 in 4 is quadzilla). If you mean "between marathons" as the time between the first day's race and the second day's race, true, I don't run Smile. I eat a ton and I travel from race A to race B. If you mean, "what do you do after a double... before the race one week later", I usually take one day off. So, the double would be sat/sun. I'd take Monday off, and be running again Tuesday. If I take too many days off, I am muuuuuch more sore. FWIW, in September 2007, I ran 11 marathons. That would be one triple, two doubles, and one quadzilla. That was a fun month. Seriously fun.

                               


                              Hawt and sexy

                                Ok srlopez. Where is the quadzilla? Someday I will join the Maniacs so this is kinda need to know stuff.

                                I'm touching your pants.

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