Marathon Training and Discussions

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Big Sur Marathon 4-27-08 (Read 291 times)


Speculum Wrangler

    I've been looking forward to running this for two years... now I'm bib #374 and my sister is running w/ me! I've run Columbus the past three years and am looking forward to some hills and some scenery. Any RA'ers out there also doing BSIM '08 or have run it before and would be willing to share tips?

    Jeanne

    Grzldvt


      I am in... as always... just found out about this Forum and thought I would check it out. I like the specialized groups. Best advice I can give is to start out slo.o.o.w It is a downhill start and I cannot even begin t tell you how many people crank it up WAY too fast for the first 5 miles, burn out by mile 17 and end up walking the rest. Know your pace. I add 5-10 seconds a mile to my first 6 miles, then slowly make that up over the next 8-9, and then settle in to the finish. Then there is my famous line - Respect the hills, don't fear them.....

      27 Big Surs working on number 28


      straw man

        Wow! I have no where near the experience of the Grizzled Vet, but I guess few people do. I have done the full marathon at Big Sur twice, but I may never get to do it again, because it has become a family tradition to do the marathon relay there. If done the Big Sur Marathon Relay four times, and I'll be back again this year. Team Air Nairn. Respect the hills. That's good advice. Respect all of them. At 10 miles, approaching half way, you'll fight your way up and over Hurricane Point, and come whipping down the other side, but you will have lots of ups and downs to come, more than it looks like in the elevation chart. Yankee Point was a killer for me. Good luck!

        He who has the best time wins. Jerry

          I ran BSIM in 2005. It was definitely the prettiest course I have ever run. We saw some whales, the weather was very good for running, and the residents along the later part of the course were very encouraging. I remember feeling very cold at the start, so do bring some sweats and a sweat bag. When you start out in the forested Big Sur area, that long, downhill start is pretty intoxicating but try to take it easy. The big hill up to Hurricane Point is what you need to "save up" for. Lots of people end up just walking it. The road is banked severely there and I remember it was a terrible effort just to stay in my shoes (they closed the other lane to us). It is absolutely brutal and seemingly unending. I wish I had walked more of it; I would have had a faster and more comfortable 2nd half. It's not a "fast course" anyway, so what's the harm in slowing down for the sake of enjoying that incredible course and saving your energy? After Hurricane Point I really had fun, though I was very tired from spending so much on that 2 miles of misery. It's a lovely race and I hope you enjoy it very much.


          Speculum Wrangler

            Thanks for the advice, all. Jerry and Grizzled - hope I somehow see you guys there. My next question: I'm a bit freaked out about the early bus ride to the start and planning my food intake and... um... outtake before the race. This will be my first "travel" marathon and I'm used to eating and "moving" about 1-2 hours in advance. It might be a little tricky to time both of these with waking up at 3-3:30 (although I'll still be on Ohio time, so that's not too big a deal), catching a 4-4:30 bus, riding for an hour, then hanging out by the porta-potties until the start. How did you manage these essential functions??

            Jeanne


            Go Pre!

              Hey Jeanne, this thread topic caught my eye as I have been wanting to run Big Sur. Can't do it this year as I really need a month more time to prep after taking a few weeks off (After Columbus which I also ran : ) and a low mileage December as I build back up. That and travel expenses will be depleted after our family winter vacation. Looks like next year hopefully Smile Good luck! Dave


              straw man

                Hi, Jeanne, Good questions. Wish I had some good answers. Try not to get too full of water before you get on the bus, and try to empty at least your bladder before you get there. That long ride down the coast always has runners, who have been over-hydrating as much as possible, gritting their teeth, crossing their legs, doing little dances, whatever they can to hold it in until they can finally get off the bus, and get in line. The pre-start area is the one bad thing at Big Sur. All there is there is a big parking lot, packed with runners, buses, and porta-johns. Sit on the right side of the bus so you can look out over the ocean while driving down the coast. Take some kind of throw-away mat you can lay on the ground in the parking lot, so you can sit down. Enjoy!

                He who has the best time wins. Jerry

                Grzldvt


                  Thanks for the advice, all. Jerry and Grizzled - hope I somehow see you guys there. My next question: I'm a bit freaked out about the early bus ride to the start and planning my food intake and... um... outtake before the race. This will be my first "travel" marathon and I'm used to eating and "moving" about 1-2 hours in advance. It might be a little tricky to time both of these with waking up at 3-3:30 (although I'll still be on Ohio time, so that's not too big a deal), catching a 4-4:30 bus, riding for an hour, then hanging out by the porta-potties until the start. How did you manage these essential functions??
                  Just like jpnairn said, watch your hydration before getting on the bus. some have facilities aboard, others don't. It is the luck of the draw. I will bring along a bagel and a small bottle of water t consume on the ride down. About the time we hit the Start, I am ready for the outtake portion. The porta pottie situation is a bit chaotic, so be prepared for a small wait. One little known tidbit, is they put a sweat truck at the back of the start line. It is quite a distance back, but the sweat buses down below are really difficult to get in and out of. By using the truack at that back, you can keep your sweats on until the last second.

                  27 Big Surs working on number 28


                  Speculum Wrangler

                    Jerry - I don't have a good visual for the location of the "best" sweats truck as you describe it. Do I want the truck at the back of the pack vs. the one close to the starting line? Gr. Vet - I'll be sure to snag a seat on the right side of the bus and take a throwaway beach towel as you suggest. Keep those tips coming - I really appreciate them! Post-marathon dining tip: I have a strong recommendation for the Rio Grill (near the finish line). We'll be making a reservation for at least 16 that afternoon. Come over and say hi if you're there - I'll be the one wearing a medal. Big grin Pre-marathon pasta feed tip: Any suggestions???

                    Jeanne

                    Grzldvt


                      You have us switched, but go for the truck that is at the back of the starting line. Very few people know about it and the start line sweat buses can get pretty messy. When you finish with your pre-race duties, walk up the hill to the start line and just keep going up the hill

                      27 Big Surs working on number 28

                      Grzldvt


                        I just created a public group for Big Sur Marathon. So we can jump in there to discuss the specifics.

                        27 Big Surs working on number 28


                        Speculum Wrangler

                          Thanks for setting up the new group, Grizzled. I'm hopping right over there! And sorry for the switching snafu. I have a tendency to mix up my imaginary friends sometimes... Confused

                          Jeanne