Marathon Training and Discussions

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Bay State (Read 181 times)

labhiker


    Bay State is known & advertised as a fast course, with a high percentage of BQs. It appears the course of flat and fast. What if you are not ready to for a BQ? Is the race appropriate for slower, middle-to-back of the pack runners? Or would it be best to pick another venue where you can blend-in with the crowd? Any feedback or comments from others who have run Bay State?

    labhiker

    xor


      I ran bay state last year at a 3:57... squarely in the middle of the pack. It was a well organized race and there was still lots of food left at the 4:30ish mark when I left the stadium. The course isn't the most exciting out there, but it was a good time. Tip if you aren't from the Lowell area: The finish is in a baseball stadium that is NEAR the start, but not AT the start. Before you exit the crowd, get someone to point you towards where you parked your car ("Say, where was the start at?"). Otherwise, you might get really lost. Or not.

       

      labhiker


        srlopez- thanks for the feedback. I would be thrilled if my time was some where close yours and under 4 hrs. But I will likely be at the back of the pack, which is OK as long as Im not alone. Training runs alone tend to be boring at times. Bay State seems like a very fast field of runners. Last fall I ran my first at 4:30. This year, who knows? I don't do any specialty speed or tempo work, only aerobic fitness and endurance stuff. My first goal is to go the distance and secondly to try for a PR. My current plan is to run my own race and avoid being pulled along too early by what will be a fast field. Seeing how the course is generally flat, should I be training on all flat roads? The vast majority of my running routes tend to be hilly and have very few flat sections. Im guessing the hills only help to strengthen the legs but do nothing for speed. Im going to miss the downhills where you can easily free-wheel and open things up.

        labhiker

        xor


          Hills are good for you. Frank Shorter (I think it was Frank) famously called hills "speedwork in disguise". And training on all flat is B O R I N G. Stay on your hilly routes, the flat race will seem like a vacation.

           


          A Saucy Wench

            Hills do good things, the uphills make you stronger, the downhills let you practice fast turnover without strain. Its all good.

            I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

             

            "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7