Masters Running

The Book Club - Name Your Favorites or Latest Recommendations (Read 1452 times)

henrun


    Also for history buffs-almost finished Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson. Much more depth than the movie and an intensive perspective on WW I.

      Just a quick note to say great thread, I enjoyed reading through it.

       

      I got a kindle about a year ago, and ever since I've been reading much more than I used to.  Not sure why, but I do really like having access to any book on my phone, Ipad and kindle...so I always have a book on me.

       

      After reading through the thread I picked up Enders Game, Unbroken and Mark of the Centipede for a total of $7.  (I love the kindle deals!)  Also grabbed a free short story by Vonnegut.  (free ftw!)  So thanks for all the suggestions.  I also look forward to grabbing the Bowerman book but may wait for a better deal.

       

      A few that I really enjoyed this year were:  the Wool series by Hugh Howey and Cyberstorm by Matthew Mather.  Both were slightly imperfect but still really fun.  Also read and can recommend Running w the Buffaloes (Chris Lear) and Marathon Man (Bill Rodgers).

        Awesome thread. I've hardly posted here, but this thread has come great suggestions. Recently I've read..

        Into the Silence by Wade Davis-nonfiction account of the first three British attempts to scale Mt Everest, nice background of WW1 too.

        I'm two thirds of the way through the Hunger Game trilogy. Reminds me of Harry Potter, a "kid's" book that's enjoyable for all ages

        I've just started a translation of the Odyssey by Stephen Mitchell that seems pretty good.

        I just read Abominable by Dan Simmons. A fictional thriller about Mt Everest. My wife & I are pretty keen on that topic.

        Dan Simmons is one of my favorite author. Writes in a few different genres but is probably best know for SciFi. His Hyperion seris is one of my all time faves and Olympida & Illium were fantastic.

        If ye like the nut, crack it.

         


        Back on Stride

          Peke98, I'm working on Robert Fagles's translation of The Iliad in the background and also have his Odyssey that I'll eventually get to. I am always awed that something written 3000 or more years ago is so understandable and filled with human situations that still resonate today.

           

          I just finished Detroit: An American Autopsy by Charlie LeDuff. OK, probably not of much interest outside this area, but a good tell-it-like-it-is chronicle by a guy -- now a newsman -- who grew up in the city and has seen it all go wrong.

          Doug, Runnin' in Rochester, MI