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100-mile runners -- long run advice/see my naive training plan (Read 61 times)

Watoni


    To make a long story short, I am seeking advice on the long run to prepare for a 100-miler since conventional wisdom treats that as the backbone of ultra training and I need to mix cycling and running this season.

     

    I did my first 50-mile race this past Saturday, and have read that many people who run 100s do not do any long runs in excess of 40-50 miles. It seems if I am going to be on my feet for at least double the time I spent during a 50-miler, I might want to do some runs where I am on my feet for 8-10 hours every so often.

     

    Of course, some people like Kelly run several 100s a year, so that obviously gets the miles in via racing. I certainly cannot do that yet, so I am planning to weight my training towards running but still hit some key cycling events (rough strokes below):

     

    This week: Cram in some cycling I should have been doing in order to prepare for a hilly double century cycling ride on the 27th. Hoping for a total of 200 miles and 20,000 feet of vertical gain (have a whopping 23 miles and 2800 feet done so far and am resting today)

     

    Next week: Short rides/runs as a mini-taper, the Devil Mountain Double Century Saturday

     

    May: Focus on getting a long run of at least 30-35 miles in every week. Get one week of around 75 miles in third week of May. Do shorter  running hill work and back to back cycling century training rides (weekend) in the last week of May.

    June: Race Terrible Two cycling double century on June 15/Run Marin Ultra Challenge 50 miler June 22

     

    July: Try to get running mileage up, mostly focus on running. Use vacation week in Marin as mini-training camp

     

    August 4 -- Ride Mt. Tam Century or Double, depending on how I feel

     

    August 17-18 -- Leadville 100!

     

    [September 16-26 Ride Cent Cols Pyrenees]


    Ultra Cowboy

      not a 100 miler but I did stay at a Holiday inn...

       

      Western States Training Camp on Ultra Signup....

      Looking for a reason to run...

      FTYC


      Faster Than Your Couch!

        Not a 100-mile runner yet, but just a few thoughts.

         

        Obviously you are in great shape, and are working on even getting stronger/more endurance. Still, I'm not sure if the Century or Double Century 2 weeks out from Leadville 100 is a good idea. I have only run 50 miles yet, and it took me 4 weeks to recover from one 50M and get ready for the next. I assume a Century or Double Century is at least as exhausting as a 50M? How was your recovery from previous Centuries or Doubles?

         

        Leadville is tough because it is run at very high altitude. Any training for this, or some days to adjust to the elevation?

         

        What is your base mileage (running, cycling), what's the peak mileage, and when do you plan on reaching that peak?

         

        Taper plans?

         

        I am sure you have given this a lot of thought, and I am not nearly in the shape, or planning stage, that you are in. Therefore I might be a bit too cautious in my approach to a 100-miler.

        Perhaps some of the more experienced runners can also comment on your plan?

        Run for fun.

          I don't cycle so I am not sure how much that will relate to running.  My guess is that you will be able to figure out nutrition/hydration/electrolyte stuff on the century/2xcentury rides and that they will be very beneficial.

           

          I think your schedule for May (30-35 mile long runs every weekend) sounds really tough.  Don't be afraid to cut 1-2 of those really short if you're not feeling it.  Also, keep the long runs slow so you can recover quicker.

           

          I like the 50 miler in June.  Since it's 8 weeks from your race, it should give you a chance to recover fully.

           

          Again, I don't now about the long rides, but 2 weeks from the race may not be the best time for a super long ride.  Is the ride a pretty hard effort or or a long easy day in the saddle?

          Watoni


            Thank you, all.

             

            For me now, a 50-miler such as Lake Sonoma is tougher than a hilly double century in terms of recovery. I rode today, did not think I was pushing too much and did my second or third best time ever on a 4 mile, 1600 foot climb. My hamstrings are so sore from Saturday I doubt I could run well at all.

             

            My goal is really to slow down the pace and go longer. If I run 20-25, I run too fast for my ability. 35-40 would force me to slow down.

             

            I agree about the Mt. Tam Double. If I felt bad or was just being conservative the century would be easy to recover from. A 5-7 hour effort on the bike is not so difficult to recover from in two weeks. An 11-12 hour effort with tough climbing can be another matter, but I am also thinking of the Pyrenees in September ... I think I will know when the time comes what to do.

             

            The notion of a 100-mile run juts scares the %$$#@@& out of me, especially at altitude, and I cannot acclimate properly. I will try some high runs in Tahoe, but they will not be much over 10,000 feet at best.

            Watoni


              Not a 100-mile runner yet, but just a few thoughts.

               

              Obviously you are in great shape, and are working on even getting stronger/more endurance. Still, I'm not sure if the Century or Double Century 2 weeks out from Leadville 100 is a good idea. I have only run 50 miles yet, and it took me 4 weeks to recover from one 50M and get ready for the next. I assume a Century or Double Century is at least as exhausting as a 50M? How was your recovery from previous Centuries or Doubles?

               

              Leadville is tough because it is run at very high altitude. Any training for this, or some days to adjust to the elevation?

               

              What is your base mileage (running, cycling), what's the peak mileage, and when do you plan on reaching that peak?

               

              Taper plans?

               

              I am sure you have given this a lot of thought, and I am not nearly in the shape, or planning stage, that you are in. Therefore I might be a bit too cautious in my approach to a 100-miler.

              Perhaps some of the more experienced runners can also comment on your plan?

              Sorry, mileage varies tremendously based on event, work, etc.

               

              Last week was 70 miles, 12,000 feet running (including the 50-miler), no biking

              This week should be about 200 miles, 22,000 feet biking, no running

              A good week is 6 hours running, 6 hours biking, but they are rare.

               

              After this week I will have about:

              750 miles, cycling with 90,000 feet elevation gain

              370 miles running with 65,000 feet elevation gain

              Gumby66


                I'm not a cyclist but I worry that to divided focus could leave you under prepared for the 100. The long ride will help dial in nutrition and help Cardio Vascular but nothing substitutes for time on your feet.

                 

                One thing I don't see in your plan that has been essential for me is back to back runs.  i've never ran longer than 40 in one run in training for a 100. But, the key for me is to get up the next day and put in another 15-20 with my legs screaming for mercy. You won't have to worry about going too fast thenSmile

                Watoni


                  I'm not a cyclist but I worry that to divided focus could leave you under prepared for the 100. The long ride will help dial in nutrition and help Cardio Vascular but nothing substitutes for time on your feet.

                   

                  One thing I don't see in your plan that has been essential for me is back to back runs.  i've never ran longer than 40 in one run in training for a 100. But, the key for me is to get up the next day and put in another 15-20 with my legs screaming for mercy. You won't have to worry about going too fast thenSmile

                  You are spot on regarding the challenge on running and cycling. That cannot really be helped, unfortunately ... I am signed up for riding 10 stages of 120 miles and 16,000 feet (average) per day in the Pyrenees in September. I did it last year with about 2,000 miles prep (most folks had 10,000 miles plus), but i need at least that.

                  My theory is you can fake cycling more than running and therefore I am running more than cycling (54 hours running to 40 hours cycling in 2013). As I get more time on my feet I can hopefully ramp up more running. The one advantage is when I hit my limit running, I can still get cardio cycling and I find it is my best recovery aid.