Barefoot Runners

1

LivingBarefoot.info reviews Invisible Shoes huaraches (Read 753 times)

    I would like to make a suggestion: your instruction say that you need a piece of paper, but you actually supply the paper. Since the kit comes with paper, why not just use that? This is what I did. I don't like to waste.


    I agree with most of this review of the kit and Huaraches in general. I have over 40 mile on mine now and love them. I would add that the lacing softens and was a tiny bit rough in the beginning.


    What is the down side of Huaraches? Well, the same as VFF; people think your crazy for running in them. I have still been asked about them while just walking around. However, a little less than my VFF.


    Warmth could be added by wearing a pair of injinjis.

     


    Huaraches Maker

      LOL!

       

      There's a cognitive bias called "mental accounting"... In my mind, I had the paper that comes with the kit in the "information" category, not the "piece of paper" category ;-)

       

      I'll definitely mention that people can use the paper that's included ;-)

        Hey thanks for the info on the "Huarache" running sandal-I have been trying to be patient in waiting for the new VFF "Bikilas," but who knows when they will be available in my area, so I think I'll give these a go...Originally, I thought it might be easier to just get the custom made VS the kit, but then thought  the person who makes them wouldn't know the dimensions of the top of my foot and heel unless the lacing  tension was designed to be adjusted ?  This information is probably on the Invisible Shoe site, but couldn't find it- went to watch the video,  but for some reason my sound isn't working... Thanks, I can't wait to get started on my huarache running sandals!<input type="hidden" id="gwProxy" />

        "Experience is not what happens to you, but what you do with what happens to you."
          The lacing is definitely adjustable. This may be bad etiquette (if it is I will delete), but Huaraches are too easy to make to pay someone else to do it. Half the work is tracing your foot. The cutting and making holes is really easy. Only part of the lacing can be done by someone else, and then you will have to adjust that once you get it. So really the person making the Huaraches only cuts the sole, puts some holes in it, and thread the lacing through the holes. This seriously is easy.

           


          Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

            The lacing is definitely adjustable. This may be bad etiquette (if it is I will delete), but Huaraches are too easy to make to pay someone else to do it. Half the work is tracing your foot. The cutting and making holes is really easy. Only part of the lacing can be done by someone else, and then you will have to adjust that once you get it. So really the person making the Huaraches only cuts the sole, puts some holes in it, and thread the lacing through the holes. This seriously is easy.

             

            I don't think he'll care, since he also sells kits so you don't have to find the material on your own. Smile

            Run to Win
            24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



              Thanks guys... I'd like to ask a question if I may-Any suggestions as to a starting point with the "huaraches" in regard to weekly mileage? Right now I'm running about 30 miles a week (3-4 runs per week) with a half marathon coming up the first week in June... Obviously, there isn't nearly enough time to get in barefoot condition to run the half in them- I don't want to cut my weekly mileage on the last part of my build up... What do think of let say going out for a 6 mile run and doing 4 miles in shoes and then the last 2 in the sandals?  Or, my 10 mile runs with 6 miles in shoes with 4 in huaraches? And so on... Any thoughts? Thanks!<input type="hidden" id="gwProxy" />

              "Experience is not what happens to you, but what you do with what happens to you."


              Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                Well, I just got done making my huaraches so I've been wearing them for about an hour but I haven't run in them yet, so can't help a ton there...

                 

                That said, I do some barefoot running and I usually add 10-20 minutes to the end of my runs.  I'd start there.

                 

                Slowly build up to more days that you do that until you have the form down pat, and then start building up how long you are doing it at a time during individual runs.

                 

                I'm looking forward to comparing the huaraches to actual barefoot because I've found that the Vibrams aren't really much like running barefoot at all.  I haven't even bothered getting my running pair out yet this year, opting for total barefoot instead, although my walking pair gets use every day (and will continue to since I can't wear open toed shoes to work.)

                Run to Win
                24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)