Barefoot Runners

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What I learned tonight about BFR (Read 519 times)


Get Lost :)

    It's a perfectly balmy 45 F here in Boston right now, still raining somewhat, and I went for a stroll in some VFFs, which I don't run in often but wore since my normal shoes (NB RX505s) are still recovering from yesterday's downpour and splashing through puddles. I have two basic problems with VFFs -- despite perpetually being faster in them, which I attribute to weight more than anything, my left foot always feels the pangs of plantar fasciitis, when it doesn't ever normally, and there's always rubbing at the poorly stitched seams of these things. I suspect at least a few other people have similar problems on their runs, and I can never decide whether or not tighter or less tight fixes these problems. What does fix these problems is wearing Injinji toe socks.

     

    Anyhow, I decided to go it barefoot for the last mile, and I ditched the VFFs. What I learned was ... the ground was really cold!! That thought never once crossed my mind! It was too cold to keep the shoes off; the bottoms of my feet were freezing after less than a block!


    Deacon

      Being a recent winter convert to BF/VFF running and in the Boston area, I haven't yet attempted an outdoor BF run here. (You are a bit braver than me.)  I do BF on the treadmill and VFF outdoors right now.  I don't know what at what temp I will switch to BF outdoors...but it will probably be somewhere north of 50 degrees (and dry). 

       

      I do know that at the beach in Maine, if the water temp is below 60, my feet can barely handle it...not sure how that translates to BFR, though... 

        The first mile in 45F is cold for me, but after that, my feet warm up nicely.


        Anything colder than that, and they don't warm up! All hail spring!

        Ed4


        Barefoot and happy

          You'll also discover that the ground temperature and the air temperature are not the same thing, and the ground temperature is what matters.

           

          45 degrees and wet is pretty tough.  But if it's dry, 45 degrees is no problem for me.

          Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.

            You'll also discover that the ground temperature and the air temperature are not the same thing, and the ground temperature is what matters.

             

            45 degrees and wet is pretty tough.  But if it's dry, 45 degrees is no problem for me.

             

            Agreed, especially when things have been salted. Yuck.

              Strange, going barefoot seems to have cured my PF.


              I'm super slow but my feet seem fine even when it's about 20 degrees here in Colorado.  Of course it's really dry.  I've only gone barefoot 2 miles for the longest run.  I only get cold if I walk or stop.  I've run on cement, pavement, cinders, fake grass and a dirt road.  I actually prefer smooth cement.  Weird.


              Can't seem to find a pair of VFFs around here and the ones I ordered online keep being delayed, now going on 3 months.


              I'm looking forward to warmer temps (it's snowing again right now).


              Thanks for the inspiration.


              Cheers.

              Runner and writer with a pesky day job. http://memoirsandhalftruths.wordpress.com/ "Don't ask yourself what the world needs - ask yourself what makes you come alive, and then go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive." -- H. T.Whitman
                There was a great article in my inbox this morning from Birthday Shoes Smile

                Here's a little blurb from the article that might explain the PF problem.

                 

                Our Arches are Asleep

                 

                With ‘great arch support’ found in traditional running shoes, our strong and springy arches haven’t had to work. Moreover, by relying on arch support, we’ve locked out one of nature’s greatest shock absorbers and stabilizers, and reduced our arches to mush. They can be rebuilt and raised up stronger than ever; however, you have to start slow. Wisely, Vibram Five Fingers are built with minimum arch support. That’s great for letting your foot do the work. But, if you do too much too fast, your muscles won’t be able to handle the new workload. Instead, you’ll force the job onto your plantar fascia, the band of easily-upset connective tissue running the length of the bottom of your foot. It was never meant to handle such force, and can quickly lead to plantar fasciitis