Barefoot Runners

1

1/2 mi - - check (Read 245 times)


Queen of 3rd Place

    My barefoot strategy is to run a short distance barefoot, and when that distance doesn't make me sore, step up the distance. So I've conquered the awesome distance of 0.5 mi...time to step it up to a mind-bending 0.75 mi. ha. Man, this is a really slow process! Much slower than starting to run in shoes. Why is that? Arla

    2013 Valley Runner of the Year Series: Feb 16 5K (4 points out of 10) ... Mar 2 10K (20/30)... Mar 16 4Mi (21/30) ... Apr 6 10K (DNS) ... Apr 21 2Mi (5/10) ... May 11 5Mi (21/30)... Jun 8 1Mi (13/20) ... Jun 16 6Mi (22/30) ... Sep 28 10K (14/20) ... Oct 5 5K (7/10) ...Oct 12 5Mi (16/20) ... Oct 20 5K (0/10) = 3rd Place, Women's Senior Division

      Boy do I know that frustration. I actually think I need to ramp back down from my plan of a mile a day. I was sore a few days last week in my calves, but not this week since improving my stretching. But while trying to do more exercises for my ankle I think I should take it easier just to be safe. Maybe only .5 mi today. I'll see how it feels. Our poor bodies just aren't used to doing what they're supposed to!
      Relax, Relax, Relax


      Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

        Much slower than starting to run in shoes. Why is that?
        Because you've spent the last 45 years wearing shoes rather than walking around barefoot and your muscles in your feet aren't up to the challenge right off the bat. It gets better.

        Run to Win
        24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



        SteveB


          Those first couple of weeks in barefeet are something to relish - not. I tried too hard in initially and got more than my share of blood blisters, but once I eased off it got better. I found that after the initial change in running style and sole toughening, the ligaments, etc in the foot, ankle, knee and hip seemed to be still realigning for 12+ months after I made the barefoot switch. I guess this is part of the legacy of 40 plus years of wearing shoes, etc. By the way, I think that your technique will continue to improve provided you are sensitive to what your feet are telling you.
          2009 Goals:
          Run 6:30 mile (or 6:01 1500m or 10:10 2.4k).
          Run 6:15 mile (or 5:48 1500m or 9:45 2.4k).
          Run 6:00 mile (or 5:33 1500m or 9:20 2.4k).
          Run 5:45 mile (or 5:18 1500m or 8:55 2.4k).
          2010 Goals:
          Run 5:30 mile (or 5:05 1500m or 8:30 2.4k).
          Run 5:15 mile (or 4:54 1500m or 8:10 2.4k).
          Run a 5 minute mile (or 4:37 1500m or 7:45 2.4k) before 50th birthday (Nov).


          Queen of 3rd Place

            Funny thing is, I never wear shoes around the house, so I thought I'd have a head start. It just didn't work out that way. The BF running has really made my feet and ankles sore, although it's mild and only lasts a day. Otherwise it's pretty fun. You sure do get some wierd looks from people! Arla

            2013 Valley Runner of the Year Series: Feb 16 5K (4 points out of 10) ... Mar 2 10K (20/30)... Mar 16 4Mi (21/30) ... Apr 6 10K (DNS) ... Apr 21 2Mi (5/10) ... May 11 5Mi (21/30)... Jun 8 1Mi (13/20) ... Jun 16 6Mi (22/30) ... Sep 28 10K (14/20) ... Oct 5 5K (7/10) ...Oct 12 5Mi (16/20) ... Oct 20 5K (0/10) = 3rd Place, Women's Senior Division


            Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

              Funny thing is, I never wear shoes around the house, so I thought I'd have a head start.
              Yes, but how often are you actually walking around in the house barefoot compared to walking around in shoes elsewhere? Here's an example of a "typical" day for an "average" person: 8 hours at home asleep barefoot in bed - 0 miles there! 8 hours at work in shoes - maybe a little walking, maybe not, depends upon your job 5 hours at home barefoot - how often do you really walk around at home? 3 hours not at home in shoes - including runs and workouts - walking to/from the car, walking around the grocery store, etc etc Most of your life was spent in shoes when you were actually walking around and using your muscles.

              Run to Win
              24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)