A Mile A Day

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Statistics (Read 231 times)

    Just in case anyone was interested, here are some statistics on our group 18 - total number of members currently Streaking 1 - members with Streaks greater than 1000 days 3 - members with Streaks greater than 1 year 5 - members with Streaks greater than 300 days 8 - members with Streaks greater than 100 days 15 - members with Streaks greater than 1 month 187 - Average length of current Streaks 139 - Average length of current Streaks (not including Young1 because he's throwing off our curve ) 3,370 - Total cumulative Streaking days (that's more than nine years worth) 0-30 days = 3 members 31-60 days = 4 members 61-90 days = 2 members 91-120 days = 1 member 121-150 days = 1 members >150 = 5 members Sorry, I was bored at lunch again. Also, I removed Legger from the chart and the statistics since I really have no way of knowing whether or not he is truly streaking.


    I fly.

      Nice.

      Bring it on.

        Geek. Big grin

        Roads were made for journeys...


        A Dance with Monkeys

          Mean, median and mode needed...
            Mean, median and mode needed...
            Picky, picky, picky.... Mean (Average) was already noted above being 187 days. Median would be 93 days And there really is no Mode because there are no two people that have streaks of exactly the same number of days. Happy now? Big grin Though I must admit I had to go look up what each of those meant - it has been a while since I took any kind of math class.


            A Dance with Monkeys

              Most excellent! Thanks for expanding your knowledge Wink Now, what about a standard deviation? Evil grin
                Most excellent! Thanks for expanding your knowledge Wink Now, what about a standard deviation? Evil grin
                252.4015371, based on the spreadsheet. MTA: No, that's a sample calculation... entire population stdev = 245.2902035

                "You can't untrain for Monkey" - bdub

                  252.4015371, based on the spreadsheet. MTA: No, that's a sample calculation... entire population stdev = 245.2902035
                  Thanks Strings - saved me having to look up the calculation. How about this - I'm an accountant so here is my ROI (Return on Investment) as I see it last year. At the end of 2007 my 5K PR was 21:00 and my marathon PR was 4:31:32. I ran my 2008 5K PR of 19:52 on July 24, 2008 after having run 1,127 miles since I started streaking. That is an ROI of 6.034 seconds off my 5K PR for every 100 miles I ran. I ran my 2008 marathon PR of 3:42:48 on October 19, 2008 after having run 1,619 miles since I started streaking. That is an ROI of 1.8 seconds off my marathon PR for every mile that I ran. (Though this is a bit skewed because my last marathon before that was in 2005 so there were some other miles in there prior to that, but not that many. I think I ran more miles in 2008 than in 2005, 2006 and 2007 combined - and maybe even 2004) But how is that for some incentive though - I would love to consistently drop 6 seconds off my 5K for every 100 miles I ran - that would cut another minute off my time for the 1000 miles I have run since last July.. Big grin


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    I added some of these stats to the google spreadsheet. They will calculate automatically.


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Mean, median and mode needed...
                      So, the reason to look at a median is to get an estimate of the middle that is not affected by outliers, like Young1.
                        I added some of these stats to the google spreadsheet. They will calculate automatically.
                        I believe the correct function is STDEVP, not STDEV

                        "You can't untrain for Monkey" - bdub


                        A Dance with Monkeys

                          What is the difference between these two? The one I used works. Of course, a standard deviation on a skewed sample is not usually very helpful.
                            What is the difference between these two? The one I used works. Of course, a standard deviation on a skewed sample is not usually very helpful.
                            I guess it depends on if you're declaring the statistics of this group as the "population" or a "sample". I'm looking at it as a "population", unless you're considering our group as a "sample" of all runners attempting streaking.

                            "You can't untrain for Monkey" - bdub


                            A Dance with Monkeys

                              I don't understand your reply.
                                I don't understand your reply.
                                Those who understand a subject well can talk about it in terms that other people (whether knowledgeable or not) can understand. On the other hand, my last experience with stats was in a 300-level statistics course 11 years ago taught by an engineering professor.

                                "You can't untrain for Monkey" - bdub

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