Swimmers

1

Breathing on both sides? (Read 347 times)


Beware, batbear...

    Will learning to breathe on both sides make me a faster swimmer?  Somewhere I gleaned that it would help.  I'm working on it right now, but sucking in quite a bit of water on the left side.  It's kind of a weird, re-learning to do something that I learned so long ago.  I don't know if I'm up to the challenge.



    2012 Goals:

    7.  Have fun! 

      It may.

       

      In my case yes it would.

       

      Currently I breath on every right arm recovery. (every other stroke). Each time you breath you tend to lift your head.....even if a little. This introduces more drag.

       

      I don't need to breath as often as I do but I can't go every four strokes. If I was comfortable with my left side I could go every 3rd stroke. This means more time being streamlined and less time introducing drag.......So in theory I could go faster.

       

      I have had a hard time breathing on my left side but admittedly have spent little time in learning to do it.

      www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

      TrailSurfer


      Husband and father of 4

        I agree with Slo_hand. I would add that it balances your stroke. It might minimize injuries a little. I would also add that it is an advantage to be able to switch sides to sight where you are, to see where other swimmers are and to avoid mouthfuls of water due to chop or competitors on one side.
        Find the fun.


        Beware, batbear...

           

          I have had a hard time breathing on my left side but admittedly have spent little time in learning to do it.

           

          Well, that makes me feel better.  At least I'm not alone.  However, I'm going to keep trying and see what happens.  

          2012 Goals:

          7.  Have fun! 


          Puttin' on the foil

            Its one of those things where you have to slow down to go faster.  Practicing bi-lateral breathing will initially slow you down, it in the long run it will make you a better and faster swimmer.  It evens out your strike and helps you work on you off-hand mechanics.  Being able to breathe from you left when there are waves or sunshine coming from the right is huge in triathlon or open water swims.  Just try bilateral breathing in the pool for a few sets during your normal workout.  Start with a 100 or 200 and gradually increase.
            Don't be obsessed with your desires Danny. The Zen philosopher Basha once wrote, 'A flute with no holes, is not a flute. A donut with no hole, is a Danish.'

              It may.

               

              In my case yes it would.

               

              Currently I breath on every right arm recovery. (every other stroke). Each time you breath you tend to lift your head.....even if a little. This introduces more drag.

               

              I don't need to breath as often as I do but I can't go every four strokes. If I was comfortable with my left side I could go every 3rd stroke. This means more time being streamlined and less time introducing drag.......So in theory I could go faster.

               

              I have had a hard time breathing on my left side but admittedly have spent little time in learning to do it.

               

              Is going every fourth stroke a good idea if you can do it?

               

              I started swimming in Jan 2010 and felt like I HAD to breath every time I was on my right side. I sawm that way for a few mnths and when I started to get more comfortable in the water (I use that loosely) I started to work on every third stroke. For the most part I can now swim the entire time bilaterally, but I am definately still stronger on my right side.

               

              Lately it seems like I'm tiring myself out by breathing every third and have been throwing in every fourth stroke breathing in the middle of a workout. I feels like I have more control over my breathing and can expel more of it without gasping for air when I turn up for it. Does that make any sense?

               

              The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

               

              2014 Goals:

               

              Stay healthy

              Enjoy life

               

                Wow.....Digging up an oldie.

                 

                BT.......This is just my simple opinion.

                 

                By taking fewer breaths you are introducing less drag....less drag could equate to more speed. BUT...if you are holding back on effort to conserve energy so you get that extra stroke before taking that next breath.....you've gained nothing.

                 

                My practice is to breath when I need to and not introduce a hypoxic state if I can avoid it.

                www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

                  You are most likely slowing down when you switch to every fourth stroke.  There is a place for swimming those types of sets just like there is a place for swimming sets where you breath every other stroke.  It's good to mix it up.  Lots of swimmers do escalating sets where they breath every 3rd, 5th, 7th, etc.. strokes.

                  Son, when you participate in sporting events, it's not whether you win or lose; it's how drunk you get. -- Homer Simpson