RA Movie Thread (Read 5605 times)

     

    Thanks.  Saved me $10.

     

    As for Olga Kurylenko, I'm in total agreement.

    (awesome photos of Olga Kurylenko in Centurion)

     

    Nice!  Somebody else likes Centurion!  
    That was such a fun movie.

    Olga Kurylenko is, hands down, the most beautiful murderous mute Pict female wilderness tracker/hunter in the history of cinema with her role in Centurion.

    zonykel


       If you found The Thin Red Line, The New World, or The Tree of Life to be boring, 

      "The tree of life" is one of the few movies I couldn't finish. It seemed like I had already watched the movie for an hour and a half and there was still another hour left.

       

      the movie reminded me of "silent light". Maybe the directors exchanged notes on prolonged sequences with no people (think of 5-minute opening of sunrise and a 5-minute closing of sunset). "silent light" wasn't just boring, but pretentious. I hated that movie and the piece of #%*% it had as the main character.

        After my morning run on my state holiday today, I went to theater for the second time in 2013 to see Oblivion. I love the six-dollar pre-noon matinees down the street from my apartment.

        After the Earth has been devastated by a war with an alien force, two humans, played by Tom Cruise and Andrea Riseborough, remain on the planet as a maintenance team to oversee the function of drone patrols. Tom Cruise's character is haunted by dreams of an encounter with a beautiful woman, played by Olga Kurylenko, in present-day New York City. When a spaceship crashes on the post-apocalyptic Earth landscape, and Cruise's character realizes that the lone survivor is the woman from his dreams, chaos ensues.

        Oblivion plays out like an extended episode of The Twilight Zone, and this is fine with me, since I have been a lifelong fan of that show. This movie also wears a great many influences on its sleeve from older and better science fiction films, such as The Planet of the Apes, The Omega Man, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Solaris, and I saw many of the plot twists coming from a mile away. I do not fault Oblivion for not reinventing the wheel, though, and it is an engaging movie on its own terms.

        Oblivion has the distinction of being one of the coolest-looking science fiction films in recent memory. The heavily computer-generated effects are given a gauzy sheen where objects sometimes appear slightly out of focus to blend seamlessly with authentic background settings, so the futuristic spacecrafts and devastated Earth landmarks look real on the remote filming locations of Iceland. The action scenes are intense enough, but I preferred the slow buildup and melancholic sequences of the film's first hour, where Cruise's character patrols over the ruins of cities. The ethereal electronic soundtrack is brilliantly helmed by M83, a band whom I have endorsed many times here on Facebook.

        If you are looking for a fun eye-candy experience, then Oblivion is a solid movie choice. 


        SheCan

          If you found The Thin Red Line, The New World, or The Tree of Life to be boring, or if you were turned off by the reliance of images and voiceovers in these films in lieu of dialogue and narration, then consider yourself warned that To the Wonder strays far outside the realm of conventional dialogue-driven stories and works more like a silent film scored with a symphony orchestra. If you are the sort who likes to stop and appreciate the beauty of random nature scenes or man-made structures, then To the Wonder excels at these explorations

          ........

          This movie may not be for everyone, but I loved it.

           

          I must be so superficial!  Cry  I also never appreciated the author James Joyce.   I so tried to watch Tree of Life and just couldn't do it.  Had to stop it.  Well at least I won't bother with To the Wonder.

           

          On another note, however, I watched Django Unchained last weekend, and really, really enjoyed it.  Its like Tarantino updated the old western. (Kinda got excited when I saw Bruce Dern.)   I don't think it was quite as good as Inglorious Bastards, but is still full of action and good ol bloody fun.  My main criticism of it, would probably be that, for me, the rhythm of the plot was a bit off.  Seemed to rise and fall too quickly and then slowly build back up.  I think better editing could probably have solved this, but I haven't heard anybody else say that bothered them.

          Cherie

          "We do not become the people who this world needs simply by turning our backs on anyone we don’t like, trust, or deem healthy enough to be in our presence. "  ---- Shasta Nelson

            Seven Psychopaths - Rockwell stole the show & there's enough alternate endings acted out to satisfy all (3.5/5)

             

            ParaNorman - superb.  the boy that cried 'ghost' wins the day (4.1/5)

             

            Cockneys vs Zombies - not as bad as you might think & it was good to see the late, great Richard Briers (3.2/5)

            My leg won't stop mooing.

             

            i think i've got a calf injury.

            mab411


            Proboscis Colossus

              Saw Moonrise Kingdom a few weeks back, and have been meaning to post about it.  Really enjoyed this movie!  It being a Wes Anderson movie, I kept waiting for it to turn dark (I've always felt his movies tend to do this, though thinking about it, I'm not sure I can point to specifics), but it kept a fairly sunny disposition as a sweet story about young love all the way through.  In fact, it could almost be considered a kids' movie, but for a few uncomfortable scenes of mild sensuality (between two pre-teens Joking) and one or two naughty words.  It caught my eye because of the cast, frankly (and I wasn't at all disappointed), but the total package was great.

               

              Also watched Wreck-It Ralph with my students this week.  Nothing at all innovative or surprising about the plot, but like Despicable Me, the voice performances and video game culture references had me rolling.  MTA: ...the interesting thing is, the 6th graders I watched it with "got" almost none of the references, but still loved it.  So it's one of those gold nuggets (coins?) that entertains on two levels, one for the kids and one for the parents.

              "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                 

                I must be so superficial!  Cry  I also never appreciated the author James Joyce.   I so tried to watch Tree of Life and just couldn't do it.  Had to stop it.  Well at least I won't bother with To the Wonder.

                 

                No, not superficial at all!  I hope that I didn't make anybody feel bad with my comments on that review.  I was simply stating that people who disliked Terrence Malick's style in films like The Thin Red Line, The New World, and The Tree of Life may not enjoy To the Wonder.  To the Wonder has even more voiceovers and less straightforward dialogue.  Great great film, in my opinion, though.

                  I watched Steven Spielberg's Jaws on Blu-ray last night.

                   

                  Everybody knows that Jaws is a classic, of course, but I have to pitch an enthusiastic recommendation for the Blu-ray transfer, because it's one of the best-looking high definition restorations of a classic movie that I've seen.  Totally flawless.

                   

                  I've always liked how, in Jaws, the people on the beach actually look like real people.  If Jaws had been filmed in present-day, all of the people at the beach would probably be perfectly-tanned hardbodies with six-pack abs, and such.  Instead, the people on the beach in Jaws are normal people, elderly people, pudgy kids, people who are dressed funny, etc.

                  This is a minor observation, but I've always appreciated it.


                  SheCan

                    No, not superficial at all!  I hope that I didn't make anybody feel bad with my comments on that review.  I was simply stating that people who disliked Terrence Malick's style in films like The Thin Red Line, The New World, and The Tree of Life may not enjoy To the Wonder.  To the Wonder has even more voiceovers and less straightforward dialogue.  Great great film, in my opinion, though.

                     

                    Jason, you're so sweet-- I didn't take it bad.  I just like to fuss!  Smile

                     

                    And I'm like you, I enjoy Jaws every time I rewatch it, a little dated but still so enjoyable.  One of the things I like about British shows and movies is how real their people are--- very few Ken and Barbie dolls.

                    Cherie

                    "We do not become the people who this world needs simply by turning our backs on anyone we don’t like, trust, or deem healthy enough to be in our presence. "  ---- Shasta Nelson

                      I remember watching Jaws 3 in 3-D at the theatre.  It was awesome Big grin

                        5k  = 19.48 10/1/13

                      10k  = 45.28 4/16/13

                      Half Marathon = 1:38.53  Summer Sizzle 7/13/14

                      Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/12  4:39.11

                      Solo O Marathon 06/02/13  3:52:10

                      Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/13 3:40.34

                        I remember watching Jaws 3 in 3-D at the theatre.  It was awesome Big grin

                        Same here!   1983 for the win.  When that shark broke through the glass window near the end, and the shards flew everywhere....  Man, that was something else.

                        mab411


                        Proboscis Colossus

                          Watched Snow White and the Huntsman last night.

                           

                          It was about what I expected...light on plot, heavy on visuals and creature design, both of which I enjoyed.  First thing I've seen Kristen Stewart in, and she wasn't nearly as awful as I'd built her up to be.

                           

                          Movie was about 30 mins. longer than it needed to be.

                          "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                            I watched The Godfather on Monday night and The Godfather: Part II last night.  I will be watching the third film tonight.  The first two movies are beyond reproach.  The third film is vastly inferior, but I like the Greek tragedy style of closure that it provides.

                             

                            I revisit these movies once a year or so.


                            Interval Junkie --Nobby

                              Les Miserables (2012)  -- I saw the musical back in the 80s and was floored at the time by the emotional content and the visceral and moral struggles put to song.  I had the audio tape.  Developed a preference for the less polished Broadway version over the crisper London rendition.  The movie is something different entirely.  Same story, of course, but the visuals, makeup and acting shouldn't be compared to a stage production; unfortunately, neither should the singing.  Crow and Jackman are terrible.  The first act is so powerfully driven by the narrative and visuals that you can ignore Crow and Jackman singing through their nose.  But the second and third acts are laden with solitary introspection and slow moving character realizations that are absolutely carried by the actor's voice.  It's as if both actors picked an octave too high and therefore struggle at the top end of their range.  Neither actor is able to ground their performances in their natural baritones, expect in speaking scenes.  I actually felt relaxation pour over me when a true singer piped up.  Eddie Redmayne? Why not someone who can sing like one of the other American Idol singers sprinkled about the cast.  To be fare, Jackman's acting is pretty darn good.  He owns his scenes in the first Act and does a good job after.

                               

                              The women, however, they hold strong.  Each actor brought something to the table.  While not necessarily the strongest voices, they balance that out with good acting interpretations of their song, and enough vocal talent to make it believable.

                               

                              There is one exception.  And maybe this is the entire reason to watch the film: Anne Hathaway singing "I Dreamed A Dream of a Time Gone By".  Measured purely vocally, I'm sure she wouldn't beat out Susan Boyle.  But a great voice and impressive acting chops combined with a powerful interpretation of the scene/song makes this just chilling.  She runs the emotional gamut; you can see her drop from wistful hope, to rage and despair.  You can see it end, this dream.  You watch its last few moments and can't help but cry along with her.  Her performance is superior to the Fantines of Broadway because the intimacy of the camera grants us access to her in a way impossible on stage.  In a 4min performance she locked in the Oscar.

                               

                              I wish they had cast this movie with lesser names who could sing.  All the B-actors, and musical actors who got no-name bit parts really shine in this movie.  The women from the garment factory, the poor in the streets, the men pulling in a ship by hand, the women washing the street.  All of them excellent and a relief to hear and see.

                               

                              So, in short: Rent it.  Rewatch the first Act several times.  But don't torture yourself with the rest of the movie. (3/5)

                              2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

                              Current Status 11/10: Back to building up miles.  Junk feels mostly okay.  Kinda.

                              mab411


                              Proboscis Colossus

                                Les Miserables (2012)  -- I saw the musical back in the 80s and was floored at the time by the emotional content and the visceral and moral struggles put to song.  I had the audio tape.  Developed a preference for the less polished Broadway version over the crisper London rendition.  The movie is something different entirely.  Same story, of course, but the visuals, makeup and acting shouldn't be compared to a stage production; unfortunately, neither should the singing.  Crow and Jackman are terrible.  The first act is so powerfully driven by the narrative and visuals that you can ignore Crow and Jackman singing through their nose.  But the second and third acts are laden with solitary introspection and slow moving character realizations that are absolutely carried by the actor's voice.  It's as if both actors picked an octave too high and therefore struggle at the top end of their range.  Neither actor is able to ground their performances in their natural baritones, expect in speaking scenes.  I actually felt relaxation pour over me when a true singer piped up.  Eddie Redmayne? Why not someone who can sing like one of the other American Idol singers sprinkled about the cast.  To be fare, Jackman's acting is pretty darn good.  He owns his scenes in the first Act and does a good job after.

                                 

                                The women, however, they hold strong.  Each actor brought something to the table.  While not necessarily the strongest voices, they balance that out with good acting interpretations of their song, and enough vocal talent to make it believable.

                                 

                                There is one exception.  And maybe this is the entire reason to watch the film: Anne Hathaway singing "I Dreamed A Dream of a Time Gone By".  Measured purely vocally, I'm sure she wouldn't beat out Susan Boyle.  But a great voice and impressive acting chops combined with a powerful interpretation of the scene/song makes this just chilling.  She runs the emotional gamut; you can see her drop from wistful hope, to rage and despair.  You can see it end, this dream.  You watch its last few moments and can't help but cry along with her.  Her performance is superior to the Fantines of Broadway because the intimacy of the camera grants us access to her in a way impossible on stage.  In a 4min performance she locked in the Oscar.

                                 

                                I wish they had cast this movie with lesser names who could sing.  All the B-actors, and musical actors who got no-name bit parts really shine in this movie.  The women from the garment factory, the poor in the streets, the men pulling in a ship by hand, the women washing the street.  All of them excellent and a relief to hear and see.

                                 

                                So, in short: Rent it.  Rewatch the first Act several times.  But don't torture yourself with the rest of the movie. (3/5)

                                 

                                I think I posted about this one earlier in the thread, but I agree.  Jackman's singing didn't bother me as much as Crowe's, but I really felt like the latter wasn't doing as much as he could have with the acting, either.  Matter of fact, I'm watching it right now (going to show it to my students tomorrow), and my goodness...Jackman is just eating him alive dramatically.  I've always rather liked Russell Crowe, but he really phoned it in on this one, IMO.

                                 

                                ...and you're exactly right about Hathaway's solo.  That's the image that really stuck with me after seeing it in the theater.

                                "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people