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my slow is too fast.Serious clarification needed. (Read 608 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    To give a little info, I got a training program from runners world, which was generated from my recent 10K race time. My slow and long runs should according to this be done at 9:51, though I cant for the life of me go at this pace, as it feels like i am barely moving. The only time I can actually go at this pace is when I am training with a friend of mine who has recently started running. But even then I find that I just have to race ahead some times and include some fartleks in order to keep up my heart rate, and stop me from getting bored. My latest example is that I have just today completed my long run of 10m and did it over a minute/mile quicker than what my training plan said that I should have done it in. In fact it was jus 37s/mile slower than my race pace. Is this going to be to the detriment? Is this plan that I am following really worth it, or shoudl I just keep up as I have been? I am sure there must e some plans put there that just state that you should be going a comfortable pace throughout, whether it be classed as easy or not, because at the moment I am just not able to rub this slow. Really struggling here guys. I have included part of the plan that I am currently following too, so have a look, and refine it if you can according to the info that i have given you.

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

      This depends in part on what you are training for. If you are training for a marathon, you can't equate your 10K race pace to your long run training pace, especially as your long runs get up into the 18-20 miles range. If you are training for shorter distances, then the recommendation might be different. However, plugging your 10K time into McMillans running calculation gave suggested long run paces of 9:30 to10:30, so RW may not be far off.
      How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
        I've looked at the runnersworld plans before and even plugged in my own times to sanity check it. It seems fine. I think the problem you're having, Eddy, is that you are so new to running that using your recent race times is of little value. For the time being, don't stress about easy pace being too fast. Just make sure it feels easy and relaxed.

        Runners run.


        Slow-smooth-fast

          I am training now for a HM, but I really want to improve my 10K time. 10Ks are my fave.

          "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

            If your recent 10K time was a good indicator of your current fitness level, then the paces recommended by RW are probably good suggestions. You are free, of course, to run faster than the suggested paces if you can complete your runs without strain. Doing so will not necessarily improve your 1/2 marathon or future 10K times, however. Faster training paces do not translate directly into faster race times. In any event, for your easy runs, just focus on getting in the miles at whatever pace you can comfortably run and that does not leave you with residual fatigue afterwards. Your pace is much more important for your tempo and speed workouts. You rated your tempo workout on Thursday as a "10/10" effort. If that was truly the case, then definitely stick to the RW recommendations for these workouts.
            How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.