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Retire Shoes? (Read 1524 times)


Marquess of Utopia

    I have been having some nagging aches lately, which I was attributing to high mileage and slick snow and ice covered surfaces. Yesterday I noticed several crakes in the “stability web” on both pair of shoes. Do you think this was caused by the cold weather? I hate to get a new pair of shoes in the cold weather just to have them break again. I was hoping to get 450 – 500 miles out of my NB 1061; I’m currently at 362 miles.


    Runner

      I may be wrong but I think you are probably about to need to retire those shoes. I start getting pain in my shoes each time I get above 350, but I am pretty hard on shoes due to my foot motion(I'ma supinator and wear the outside pretty fast). I'm looking forward to seeing some more opinions on when to really retire shoes. My guess is people are going to say, "if you question whether you need to or not then you do, because mentally you will find pains that you blame on the shoes"

      2010 Races: Snicker's Marathon(2:58:38), Scenic City Trail Marathon(3:26:36), Laurel Highlands Ultra 77(19:13:44), Ironman Louisville(13:07:07) 2011 Races: Mount Cheaha 50k 5:22:47, Tobacco Road Marathon, Mohican 100 Miler


      Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

        When I start getting aches and pains, the first thing that I do is retire shoes. I might wish to get more value out of them, but not at the expense of getting hurt and that's usually the easiest way to prevent an injury.

        Run to Win
        24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



          I would err on the side of caution, it probably is time to retire them. I've tossed a pair of pretty pricy Mizunos at 250 miles because they just weren't providing adequate protection any longer. That pissed me off, and was my first and last experience as a Mizuno customer. New Balance corporate headquarters is about 15 minutes from the homestead, and has a factory outlet store. I paid a visit on MLK day, and was chatting with a very knowledgeable member of the staff. He recommended testing the liner at about 250 miles, and replacing it if it has lost the ability to spring back when compressed. He felt it is an underrated part of the shoe's cushioning system, and replacement should allow extended use up to 500 miles in most cases. I've actually replaced the liner on brand new shoes, because in many cases the factory insert is pretty cheesy. I'll definitely check the resilience of the liner at about 200 miles, and see if replacing it is worthwhile.

          E.J.
          Greater Lowell Road Runners
          Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

          May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

          hdh


            I agree with Run to Win. Though I track the miles on each pair, once I notice heat buildup in the soles after a run or aches in the body, I retire the shoes.
            hdh
              I just retired a pair at 290, in warm weather, on soft surfaces. I guess that's something one has to get used to- not keeping shoes for the 'recommended' time, but listening to one's body and looking at the shoes. I'm going to be listening more to RTWs advice, and getting rid of shoes much earlier than in the past. I'm now rotating pairs, as well.

              Race Plans

              New Year's Race Los Angeles, January 3, 2015

              invisible


                I just retired a pair of TNF 'Ultra 103 XCR's' at 550 miles and replaced them with TNF 'Arnuva 100 TR GTX's' They're both heavy duty trail/Winter running shoes.
                90 percent of the game is not giving up.


                I run for Fried Chicken!

                  I would err on the side of caution, it probably is time to retire them. I've tossed a pair of pretty pricy Mizunos at 250 miles because they just weren't providing adequate protection any longer. That pissed me off, and was my first and last experience as a Mizuno customer.
                  I started getting aches after only 200 miles in my Mizunos. I went out and bought another pair of shoes and I've been rotating them and the pain has gone away. I'm thinking that it just takes longer for the Mizunos to bounce back.
                    I started getting aches after only 200 miles in my Mizunos. I went out and bought another pair of shoes and I've been rotating them and the pain has gone away. I'm thinking that it just takes longer for the Mizunos to bounce back.
                    That could very well be true, I had heard nothing but great things about the Mizunos. The rave reviews probably contributed to the degree of dissatisfaction that I felt.

                    E.J.
                    Greater Lowell Road Runners
                    Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

                    May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

                    VictorN


                      I'm a strict 300 mile guy. After 300 miles, the shoes get retired. I'll retire them before that if appropriate, but they never go beyond that. And, yes, I'm risk averse. Victor
                      billycat


                        The more variance there is within the sole of the shoe - by which I mean dual-density areas, footbridges, stability webs etc - the more the shoe will have the potential to cause aches and pains when it gets old. When it is brand new, everything is uniform in the sole, and as your foot lands it is supprted evenly, as it should be. As the sole ages, parts of it compress and parts of it - where there are tougher compnents such as the harder part of a dual-density midsole - don't compress so much. So where before you were landing on an even surface, after x hundred miles that surface is less even and your foot is subtly distorted each footstrike. This is why counting mileage is not the best plan for deciding when to bin your shoes. Aches and pains are a good measure, and examing the midsole for creases and cracks in certain areas, such as at the junction of the harder and softer parts. Ironically, a neutral shoe or a racing flat can last longer, IMO, cos it wears down evenly. I have a pair adidas neftengas from 1999, still fine for short runs, and still very comfortable, several hundred miles on the clock, and yes they have apcked down a bit, and are less bouncy, but the profile is still as it should be. Also just spotted a little round-up of best shoes for 2008 in this blog www.runflux.com/blog which may help decide on a new one. it's not a massive review, just a few of the better ones... Happy running!


                        Bugs

                          What to see my podiatrist bills? Trust me, new shoes are cheap.

                          Bugs

                            I'm not a strict mileage measurer. Like others, I look at the compression of the midsole. I also look at the outsole - if there'e any mid showing through the outsole, I get a new pair of shoes. I like the fit and ride of Mizunos, but they're very poor in that repsect - I barely got 200 miles out of my last pair of Wave Riders before the outsole wore through.
                            invisible


                              It's too bad, eh? A brilliant technology in such a poor package. My Wave Riders are exclusively for treadmill running and they still die a premature death.
                              90 percent of the game is not giving up.
                              JOHNMAGGIO


                                A cracked stability web is a defect. I personally have never seen it happen, but with the cold weather and all I guess it could happen. Call New Balance direct at 800-253-7463 and I would hope they would send you a new pair. Even with wear and tear the stability web should not crack. Especially on a 100 dollar shoe.
                                www.nbannapolis.com
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