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Effect of Job Type on Running (Read 428 times)

Tim19889


    Hi Everyone,

     

    Here's my story. I'm twenty-five years old, and about a year ago I was running five miles on a regular basis, at an 8.5 mph pace. When playing soccer one day, I had an ankle injury, and stopped running for about three months. Then winter came, and I stopped running for another three months, so I was off for about a total of six months. During that time I also went from working a full time job where I was standing/walking 90% of the time, to an office job where I sit 90% of the time. Anyways, I bought a treadmill and started running again about three months ago. The problem is, I'm making really slooooooow progress now, way slower than I used to. When I started running about three months ago, I could only do 0.65 of a mile at an 8.5 mph pace. After three months, I've only improved to 1.20 miles at a 8.5 mph pace. I run regularly every other day. Once I hit my limit at 8.5 mph, I slow my pace down to 7.5 mph and try to do a total of 3 miles.

     

    My question is, why can't I run like I used to anymore, and make progress as fast as I used to? I mean I used to be able to add a mile per month to my runs, at an 8.5 mph pace, easy, but not anymore. The only thing I can think of that's changed is my job. Like I said, I now sit 90% of the day instead of walk/stand. Has anyone else had similar experiences? Were you able to get your running mojo back eventually? Any other ideas why I can't seem to make much progress? Thanks ahead of time for any input.


    The Irreverent Reverand

      My advice? Slow down. You were running about a 7:00/mile pace, and now you're trying to do it at about an 8:00/mile pace. If you can't go but less than 1.5 miles at your pace, you're going too fast. The office work and six months off may have something to do with it, too, but I think the problem is more in your pace than in your day job.

      Husband. Father of three. Lutheran pastor. National Guardsman. Runner. Political junkie. Baseball fan.

       

      Goals for 2014:

      Sub-3:30 marathon; run for a year free from major injuries or interruptions

      PRs: 3:27 marathon; 1:41 half; 45:07 10K; 23:26 5K; 6:02 mile; <12 parsecs Kessel Run

      NHLA


        Get a drafting table instead of a desk and stand up when using computer. I work in an office but never sit down.

        After a 6 mo layoff it is just like starting all over again. Forget about what you used to do.

        Try one of the couch to 5k programs.


        Feeling the growl again

          You're approaching this backwards.  You don't race every workout to see how long you can keep up a high speed (or speed that USED to be right for you).  Rather, SLOW DOWN to say 6mph and run further.  It is the total time/distance you spend running that will, in the end, allow you to eventually return to your former fitness.

           

          You're not getting much of a beneficial workout not being able to run more than about a mile.  SLOW DOWN to a truly easy pace, cover 3-4 miles.  Do this every other day...then add at least one more day into the week.  Over time you will find that you can speed up at the same effort.

           

          This is one of the most common mistakes made by newer runners.  Fortunately it is also an easy fix.  Smile

          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

           

          ShuffleFaster


            Agree with all that has been said.

             

            With regards to your job--prolonged sitting has some other untoward effects that may affect running as well---people can end up with weak glutes and tight hamstrings, and it is certainly associated with weight gain.  Sitting has also been independently associated with poorer health outcomes.  There was an interesting study not too long ago that the negative health impacts of sitting persisted despite exercise.  (Keep in mind these outcome studies have all the limitations of most other observational studies--lack of causation, difficulty with controls, etc.)  I still agree with the other's though:  sitting probably isn't your main issue.

             

            The other types of jobs I think make training effectively more difficult are shift work type jobs, especially with regards to circadian disruption.  It doesn't mean that you can't run well with these types of jobs, but copious evidence demonstrates that abnormal day/night sleep patterns have health consequences.  (Unfortunately, not very comforting to those of us with those jobs...)

              Age 25 maybe be the tipping point.  Older, desk job, start thinking about family, metabolism slows down, etc.

               

              How much weight have you gained?  Are you ready to move up to the next pant size?  This is the voice of experience talking.

               

              But as others have said, you can instead try running slower, for longer, and thus you will be burning more calories overall to keep fat away.  Getting your muscles back in shape.  And maybe delaying the illness of old age that I mentioned above Smile

                Another point, I find that when I start a treadmill run, I cannot run my normal pace right away. I usually start at 5.5 MPH (close to 11 minute miles), then slowly speed up as I get more comfortable. Only after 2 or 3 miles can I comfortably run my "normal" pace of 8:45 - 9:15 minute miles.

                 

                I don't seem to have this issue on the road. So something to think about

                Jon the Freshman


                  Age 25 maybe be the tipping point.  Older, desk job, start thinking about family, metabolism slows down, etc.

                   

                  How much weight have you gained?  Are you ready to move up to the next pant size?  This is the voice of experience talking.

                   

                  But as others have said, you can instead try running slower, for longer, and thus you will be burning more calories overall to keep fat away.  Getting your muscles back in shape.  And maybe delaying the illness of old age that I mentioned above Smile

                  Wow thats depressing...I didn't know 25 was the new old age. Most marathoners don't peak until their late twenties early thirties. Heck in ultras you don't peak until your mid-thirties. I would suggest looking at your diet as I'm sure you weren't focused on it while you were inactive. So a change in your diet may affect your overall lifestyle and physical health. Also think about your muscular systems. You seemed to be very strong and active, running and playing soccer, but after that period you probably lost that body composition. Look into developing a core routine and some weight lifting (squats, lunges, clean, presses) so you can build up your running muscles to run the pace you want all while developing greater endurance through repeated efforts

                    Was just pointing out that after college age, many people find they have to work harder to keep up a level of performance they used to take for granted.  It is a normal part of aging.

                     

                    Who it happens to, and when, can vary.

                      Wow thats depressing...I didn't know 25 was the new old age. Most marathoners don't peak until their late twenties early thirties. Heck in ultras you don't peak until your mid-thirties. I would suggest looking at your diet as I'm sure you weren't focused on it while you were inactive. So a change in your diet may affect your overall lifestyle and physical health. Also think about your muscular systems. You seemed to be very strong and active, running and playing soccer, but after that period you probably lost that body composition. Look into developing a core routine and some weight lifting (squats, lunges, clean, presses) so you can build up your running muscles to run the pace you want all while developing greater endurance through repeated efforts

                       

                      It's not.


                      Old , Ugly and slow

                        If you are 25 you might as well give up.

                        first race sept 1977 last race sept 2007

                         

                        2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

                        jimmyb


                          The biggest effect of one's job on running is mental stress. If work stress gets into areas that would be considered abnormally high for you, the stress hormones can effect your body in a detrimental way. Some runners will see a regression in pace at the same HR when things get nuts at work and home. In these periods, a certain amount of exercise is good, but your normal training load might be too much, and cutting back can help you get out of regression. Everyone's different in this regard. Everyone handles stress in their own way. One person's delightful challenge is another one's ticket to a breakdown.

                          Log

                            I ran in college but did much better from 25 to 34 than 18 to 24. Desk jobs are actually pretty good--try doing 8 to 10 hours of hiking or fence building at 9000 feet in elevation while trying to train for marathons (which is what I did at 25). Well that was actually quite fun.  I tended to feel best in grad school because I had work but also moving around a lot during the day, maybe just a few hours a day at a desk. Been a desk jockey for most of years since the late 1990s. Yes, stressful jobs take a lot out of you and the stress hormones af an impact. Weight gain (or loss in extreme cases) is one of them.


                            In addition to your running take a break twice a day or so. 15 minute walk. Pretend you are still in college and you're walking to classes. Watch your diet and keep running. Easy days easy, hard days, harder than easy and mix them up.

                            Tim19889


                              Thanks for the feedback everyone. What I seem to be hearing a lot of you say is to run longer distances, at a slower pace, get in better shape that way, and then I can start speeding my runs up, so I will try that and see how it goes. I'm also going to start training my legs harder with weights at the gym. I've kind of been neglecting that lately, and when I was running so well before, I was also working out my legs more at the gym.

                               

                              Thanks again for for the great feedback all


                              A Sweetheart

                                The biggest effect of one's job on running is mental stress. 

                                 

                                As someone who works on their feet everyday, anywhere from eight to sixteen hours without a break, I say you are out of your flipping mind. At the end of the day my legs are swollen and my feet feel like they have had a hammer taken to them.  If I don't run in the morning there is a very good chance that I won't be running in the evening.  It makes doubles impossible since I would never sit or recover between the two runs.  The only plus I can see from this is that as an ultra runner I am competing against people that sit on their asses all day and then go for long runs.  My body is used to being up and moving for long stretches.  I have to believe that helps.

                                I want to do it because I want to do it.  -Amelia Earhart

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