Sub 3 How many miles per week? (Read 2484 times)

    I agree that it's very hard to generalise about miles needed to get to performance level X, for any X.

     

    For example weight and age are both important factors (along with others). On average skinny 25 year olds are going to need significantly fewer miles per week than chubby 55 year olds...

      pr100, of course it hard to generalise but if you try to give some relevant data, it may be possible. For example:

       

      1. Gender

      2. Age

      3. BMI (or height and weight)

      4. Years of running experience and historic mileage

      5. Number of marathons. Best performance in a marathon.

      6. Type of training; for example following a schedule or random training.

      7. Current VDOT (taken from a race recentlly). Highest VDOT and when it was obtained

      8. Obtained results on different distances; even though this may resemble VDOT, it adds extra information if your half-marathon times relatively speaking are far better than your 5K times or vice-versa.

      9. Injury history

      10. Time the runner is willing to use per week to break 3 hours.

       

      I'm sure that there are many other parameters you can use, for example perhaps max heart rate.

      xor


        Well heck, let's predict 2:30 while we're at it.

         

          and it will rain that day.

           

          I followed the FIRST program and where it predicted a 3:40, I got a 3:39:40.  I followed Lydiard and IT was 20-25 mins off. 

            pr100, of course it hard to generalise but if you try to give some relevant data, it may be possible. For example:

             

            1. Gender

            2. Age

            3. BMI (or height and weight)

            4. Years of running experience and historic mileage

            5. Number of marathons. Best performance in a marathon.

            6. Type of training; for example following a schedule or random training.

            7. Current VDOT (taken from a race recentlly). Highest VDOT and when it was obtained

            8. Obtained results on different distances; even though this may resemble VDOT, it adds extra information if your half-marathon times relatively speaking are far better than your 5K times or vice-versa.

            9. Injury history

            10. Time the runner is willing to use per week to break 3 hours.

             

            I'm sure that there are many other parameters you can use, for example perhaps max heart rate.

             

            Once you have all that "data" (by the way, this stuff used to be called "knowledge") you're not really generalizing anymore. Smile

              Once you have all that "data" (by the way, this stuff used to be called "knowledge") you're not really generalizing anymore. Smile

               

              That's true, generally speaking :-)

              xor


                There's a colonel of truth in there.

                 

                Scout7


                CPT Curmudgeon

                  Once you have all that "data" (by the way, this stuff used to be called "knowledge") you're not really generalizing anymore. Smile

                   

                  Data is just tidbits or general facts.

                  "My heart rate is 164."

                   

                  Information is data with context.

                  "My lactate threshold heart rate is 164."

                   

                  Knowledge is information applied to a specific situation.

                  "I can run a 10K at my lactate threshold heart rate."

                   

                  Wisdom is knowledge extrapolated to encompass generalities.

                  "If I focus on developing my overall endurance by running a majority of the time below my lactate threshold heart rate, with some time spent at or above it, I should see improvements in my race times."

                    Data is just tidbits or general facts.

                    "My heart rate is 164."

                     

                    Information is data with context.

                    "My lactate threshold heart rate is 164."

                     

                    Knowledge is information applied to a specific situation.

                    "I can run a 10K at my lactate threshold heart rate."

                     

                    Wisdom is knowledge extrapolated to encompass generalities.

                    "If I focus on developing my overall endurance by running a majority of the time below my lactate threshold heart rate, with some time spent at or above it, I should see improvements in my race times."

                     

                    Nice.

                     

                    I would put it like this:

                     

                    Data is what computers crunch.

                     

                    Knowledge is what humans understand.

                     

                    Wisdom is what we wish we knew.


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Depends on the computer.


                      Depends on the human.

                      Adam_runbyfeel


                        That works but isn't as efficient as possible.  Your heart doesn't know the conditions outside, if you are getting sick...  If you try to follow a pace and you haven't fully recovered from a previous workout then you are just making things worse.  My personal example is this.  One day, a friend asked me to do a farlek session.  He is a 2:21 marathoner so I was struggling a bit, it was a work out that was too hard for my current fitness.  The following day not only was it hard to run easy, I could not get my heart rate up to an aerobic zone!  It took me two days to recover.  This delayed my progress, as I could not get in the required work.  Know your current limits and this will never happen.

                        xor


                          pibstar

                          pabstars

                           

                          Interesting.

                           

                            pibstar

                            pabstars

                             

                            Interesting.

                             

                            I noticed this too ... bizarre !!

                            I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.

                            TripleBock


                              I think if this happens 2-4 times a year it's ok - Not because you know that you are over doing it and your still over do it.  But because you are testing your limits - Think you can do it, but find out your not ready.

                               

                              Although the majority of people run too fast for the purpose of the workout ... That was me for years - Now I might be guilty more on the other end - Running easy runs too slow.

                               

                               This delayed my progress, as I could not get in the required work.  Know your current limits and this will never  seldom  happen.

                              I am fuller bodied than Dopplebock

                                ... beat to the punch.  Should have finished the thread.

                                "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

                                Jack Kerouac