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Lengthing one's stride (Read 309 times)

sport jester


Biomimeticist

     

    Is this what you are asking for

     

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7961241?dopt=Abstract

     

    http://blog.saucony.com/training/stride-rate-running/

     

    http://www.kihu.fi/tuotostiedostot/julkinen/2007_num_factors_re_10000.pdf

    Oh princess, I couldn't ask for better proof you have no clue to what being a good runner really is...

     

    Start with the basics would you, when you enter the curves of any race, like it or not, you slow down.

    http://jeb.biologists.org/content/210/6/971.abstract

     

    Which is hilarious given fact that faster bipedal athletes actually speed up in the curve portion of any race. They're called ostriches.

     

    Maybe that explains why the world record for the women's 1,500m, 3K, and 10K events are held by women trained by a coach who studied deer and ostriches.

     

    I trained race horses and studied ostriches... HMMMMMMM

     

    Given the dung heap you call Jack Daniels demands every coach to drink his puke, nobody has the guts besides me to point out his worthless drivel has no merit.

    http://jap.physiology.org/content/89/5/1991

     

    Oh and for everyone who kisses his ass and promotes his 180 step per minute cadence, regardless to how cute their name is; be it POSE, ChiRunning, Evolution Running, or the garbage spewed by the current media darling Dan Lieberman, not only can't document what it improves, I'll gladly point out how stupid anyone is to follow it.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16195026

     

    So in continuation, I' still waiting for anyone with an IQ higher than my shoe size to explain why no science backs up any of their barf you keep regurgitating here thinking its actually valid.

     

    Oh wait... here's another one

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24002340

     

    And another one

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23681915

     

    And another one

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23326341

     

    And if that isn't enough, then please tell me why even fossil footprints of humans running 23,000 years ago also ran with a heel strike. Not to mention they were faster than Usain Bolt...

    http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2005/12/21/ancientfootprints_narrowweb__300x450,0.jpg

     

    Need I continue?

     

    Or does that explain why those with real medical degrees who supervise the training of Navy SEALs, Army Rangers, Special Forces, and DELTA FORCE, agree with me. Or better yet, when was the last time SEAL Team 6 asked you for a training proposal????

    Experts said the world is flat

    Experts said that man would never fly

    Experts said we'd never go to the moon

     

    Name me one of those "experts"...

     

    History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong


    Prince of Fatness

      Semi-retired.

        bap


          Oh princess, I couldn't ask for better proof you have no clue to what being a good runner really is...

           

          Do you have anything on distance running?

          Age 52

          2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40


          Feeling the growl again

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             

            sport jester


            Biomimeticist

               

              Do you have anything on distance running?

               

              The science of speed in any runner goes far beyond only  two variables in measure, which is my point in this. First off, your body travels in a figure eight pattern, which is determined by far more than any such simple stride cadence formula. In my world, that's a nursery school level of understanding.

               

              If you think a marathon runner runs 26.2 miles, to me that's what I call the barstool answer. Because I can walk into any sports bar in the world and get that answer. If anyone is a true scientist in the field of athletic training, they'd tell you the real distance once body displacement is factored in is more than 30 miles for the elite, and about 36 for you.

              http://www.nytimes.com/1990/04/16/sports/on-your-own-runner-s-shortest-path-straight-line.html?src=pm

               

              That's the science of running faster in one sentence; learning the biomechanic and perceptual skills necessary to reduce your physical displacement as close to 26.2 miles as one possibly can.

               

              Do you measure your step width? Because it factors into improving speed as well as reducing risk of IT Band issues. But apparently nobody here has the ability to describe that relationship., .

              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21316058

              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22052870

              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23259236

               

              Do you know your drift rate? Since its biologically impossible to run in a perfectly straight line, science says you're adding 7-12ft in distance every 20 seconds you run.

               

              How do you train to reduce your drift rate?

              http://www.journalofvision.org/content/1/3/4

               

              And we haven't even gotten into strength differential yet. The human body is naturally stronger on one side of your body than the other. The question is which side determines your peak speed? You run with your weakest leg determining top speed.

               

              Race horses as well as multiple other athletes utilize their stronger legs to reach top speed. And if you don't think the difference between the two techniques is significant, its the primary reason the top runners cross the finish line long before you ever do...

               

              Which is why if your figure eight measurements can be reduced by 20%, then increasing your running speed by 20% is easy to do.

              Experts said the world is flat

              Experts said that man would never fly

              Experts said we'd never go to the moon

               

              Name me one of those "experts"...

               

              History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

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