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When should I do my first race? (Read 100 times)

    I began seriously running in July. I've been averaging about 4-5 runs per week varying between 1.5 to 3.5 miles. My current average pace is sitting around the 11:00/mile mark depending on the run.

     

    There is a race coming up in the beginning of October, the setting of which is imprtant to me (it's organized by the local Deaf community). I'd really like to participate in the event, but I'm not so sure I'm ready for a race yet.

     

    Any thoughts?

    5K: 33:21 (2013)

      My guess is that you're ready.

      But, what's the distance?  5km?  10km?

      If it's a half marathon or longer, maybe my answer would change.

      By the way, I have a special love for the deaf community.  I hope you enjoy every minute of the race!

      (which deaf community is organizing the race?)

      Cheers,

      2014 Goals:

      #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

      #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

       

        My guess is that you're ready.

        But, what's the distance?  5km?  10km?

        If it's a half marathon or longer, maybe my answer would change.

        By the way, I have a special love for the deaf community.  I hope you enjoy every minute of the race!

        (which deaf community is organizing the race?)

        Cheers,

         

        It's a 5K. Anything with the word "marathon" in it scares me a little bit. Right now, at least.

         

        The Metro Deaf School in Minneapolis is organizing the event. I've been looking for an opportunity to get involved and meet people in the Deaf community. This seems to be the perfect place to do that and have fun running.

        5K: 33:21 (2013)


        Latent Runner

           

          It's a 5K. Anything with the word "marathon" in it scares me a little bit. Right now, at least.

           

          The Metro Deaf School in Minneapolis is organizing the event. I've been looking for an opportunity to get involved and meet people in the Deaf community. This seems to be the perfect place to do that and have fun running.

           

          Given that it's a 5K I completely agree with KerCan; go for it (and keep us posted on how you do).  Smile

          Fat old man PRs:

          • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
          • 2-mile: 13:49
          • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
          • 5-Mile: 37:24
          • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
          • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
          • Half Marathon: 1:42:13

             

            It's a 5K. Anything with the word "marathon" in it scares me a little bit. Right now, at least.

             

            The Metro Deaf School in Minneapolis is organizing the event. I've been looking for an opportunity to get involved and meet people in the Deaf community. This seems to be the perfect place to do that and have fun running.

             

            You are ready.

            Like most of the other 'racers", you will be there to enjoy your day and support a great cause, and will not be there to win the race.

            (I have 5 cousins who are deaf and blind that are very involved in the communities they live in.  They don't currently live in MN though)

            2014 Goals:

            #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

            #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

             


            Interval Junkie --Nobby

              Short answer: as soon as possible; get a baseline on which to judge all your future progress.  This is where you started.

              2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

              Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!


              Will run for scenery.

                You're already running 3.5 miles in one go, so from that point of view you're already ready.  Keep running/training sensibly, show up the day of the event, give it a good effort, and have a wonderful day.  Signing up for a (sensible, appropriate) race is a wonderful motivator.

                 

                The problem we all face as newbies is wanting to get "there" ASAP : "I've never run before. I'm having hip surgery tomorrow.  Can I run an ultra-marathon in 2 weeks ?"  Do not do that.  The single most important thing to know is that your bones, tendons, cartilage, etc. will be much, much, stronger and healthier after a year of gentle consistent running (with gradual increases in distance/intensity) than they are right now.  There is no way to speed that up.  If you do the right thing and build up gradually, you will enjoy running a heck of lot more than people who start out too fast.

                 

                Good Luck !

                Stupid feet!

                Stupid elbow!

                  my nonrunning wife is legally deaf w/o aids.  she had cochlear implant about 2 yrs ago & it really changed her life.  I mean seriously changed her life (and of less importance, my life).  so fantastic cause to support!!

                   

                  as for participating in the race,  yeah go for it.  just start out at your normal pace & the other runners will pull along after that.   doing 3.5 miles at 11 pace on daily runs, you may be surprised at what you can do with the extra adreneline flowing at a race.  just dont get caught up at the start with all the excitement.  run your race, your pace.

                   

                  good luck, report back

                    Good luck with your race. In case you haven't seen it, this classic first race advice post is worth a read. Have fun!

                      my nonrunning wife is legally deaf w/o aids.  she had cochlear implant about 2 yrs ago & it really changed her life.  I mean seriously changed her life (and of less importance, my life).  so fantastic cause to support!!

                       

                      as for participating in the race,  yeah go for it.  just start out at your normal pace & the other runners will pull along after that.   doing 3.5 miles at 11 pace on daily runs, you may be surprised at what you can do with the extra adreneline flowing at a race.  just dont get caught up at the start with all the excitement.  run your race, your pace.

                       

                      good luck, report back

                       

                      That's what I'd be afraid of -- getting caught up in the moment and starting out too strong. Pacing is something I need work on. There's still time between now and the race, which means practice and time for improvement. Smile

                       

                       

                      Good luck with your race. In case you haven't seen it, this classic first race advice post is worth a read. Have fun!

                       

                      Great article, thanks for pointing it out!

                      5K: 33:21 (2013)